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  • You're woken up by a bang at the door.

  • Open up!

  • Come out with your hands up!”

  • You can't believe this is happening.

  • Could you really be in trouble with federal officials...over lunchmeat?

  • You might be surprised.

  • There are a lot of laws on the books in the United States - and some are genuinely bizarre.

  • Here are some of the craziest state and federal US laws that still exist.

  • One thing that all states have in common is laws against drunk driving.

  • It's illegal in all fifty states to operate a motor vehicle with a blood alcohol level

  • above a certain level.

  • Some states expand that to other vehicles like bikes, scooters, and even tractors.

  • But Wyoming adds a unique vehicle to that - skis.

  • Skiing under the influence could get you charged with a misdemeanor and facing up to twenty

  • days in jail.

  • It makes sense - a drunk skier could cause a dangerous crash that could hurt themselves

  • or others - but how often does this happen exactly?

  • Some laws are common-sense - maybe a little too common sense.

  • Have you ever told a friend “I know this route so well, I could find it blindfolded!”?

  • Well, you're apparently not the only one - because in Alabama, someone might have taken

  • that challenge a little too literally.

  • The southern state has a law on the books prohibiting driving while your vision is obscured

  • with a blindfold.

  • As it's unlikely to have happened too often, we're guessing that the law might as well

  • have been named after the person who inspired it.

  • So when in Alabama, don't be a Dave - keep your eyes on the road!

  • Another area where a lot of strange laws come into play?

  • Our furry friends.

  • Maybe you have a grandma who loved to knit - and she would use anything she could get

  • her hands on to create a sweater.

  • Well, if she lives in Delaware, there's one thing you don't have to worry about

  • her using.

  • It is illegal in the tiny northeastern state to sell dog or cat hair, a Class B misdemeanor

  • to sell any part of a domestic dog or cat.

  • This is no doubt a disappointment to the owner of Persian cats everywhere as they coat the

  • house in a thin layer of hair every shedding season.

  • But there's nothing stopping her from knitting from her own pet's sheddings

  • But this next one might be a little harder to enforce.

  • In the old days in Indiana, it was apparently pretty popular to have high-intensity horse

  • races.

  • These would often take place in public streets, which could be a danger to pedestrians.

  • So the state passed a common-sense law - banning people from riding horses above ten miles

  • an hour anywhere in the state.

  • There's just one problem - did anyone tell the horses?

  • They probably don't know how to read speed limits, and an out-of-control horse could

  • mean a ticket.

  • But with the arrival of cars, that's probably less of a worry.

  • How fast do they go again?

  • But at least this law protects one animal...maybe?

  • Bigfoot.

  • The most mysterious North American megafauna - or maybe just a guy named Bob in a gorilla

  • suit.

  • Many people believe the missing link exists, and they go into the woods regularly searching

  • for him.

  • But if you're bigfoot-hunting in Washington state, better make sure that you're only

  • armed with a camera.

  • Since 1969, the famous cryptid has been legally protected, with shooting a Bigfoot being a

  • felony punishable by five years in prison.

  • And he's now legally classified as an endangered species.

  • If you see him, let him know.

  • It's not the only state with some strange hunting regulations.

  • In Virginia, there's a rich hunting tradition.

  • Sportsmen and those looking to put some game on the menu go out daily to shoot birds and

  • mammals in the woods - except on Sunday.

  • This isn't uncommon, as many states have regulations preserving Sunday as a day of

  • rest for religious reasons.

  • But there's one exception to this no-hunting bill in Virginia.

  • The law bans the shooting of any wild bird or wild animal, including nuisance species

  • on Sundays - with the exception of raccoons.

  • Virginia really wentWe hate this one species particularly”.

  • Poor trash pandas.

  • We bet this next law never even crossed your mind.

  • There's nothing like a frog-jumping competition...right?

  • Okay, not many people know about this sport, which involves seeing how far a frog can jump

  • after startling it.

  • But this can be occasionally dangerous for the frog, and California wants to make sure

  • these heroic athletes get treated well.

  • If a frog is killed or otherwise dies in the competition, it is forbidden to eat it or

  • use the body for any other purpose.

  • Alas, no drowning the sorrows of losing a prize jumping frog with an appetizer of frog

  • legs.

  • Few areas have more strange laws than food.

  • In Connecticut, they take pickles seriously.

  • When legislators were discussing how to check for good-quality pickles - because really,

  • biting into a mushy pickle is pretty disgusting - they passed a law stating that any pickle

  • sold in the state must be able to bounce when dropped on the floor.

  • This was actually tested in 1948, when two pickle vendors were reported for selling pickles

  • that were unfit for human consumption.

  • Sure enough, their wares didn't bounce, and they were arrested.

  • But that raises the question of how safe it is to drop pickles on the floor

  • Did you know you could get arrested...over pizza?

  • We've probably all had it happen to us.

  • We hear a knock at the door, and there's a pizza deliveryman holding a piping-hot pie

  • - but you didn't order a pizza!

  • Maybe it was a prank, maybe it was a misprint, but now you're having an awkward argument

  • and you probably want pizza.

  • Well, in Louisiana, sending someone a pizza they didn't order is actually considered

  • harassment.

  • This applies to intentionally trying to stick someone with a pie, but an accidental address

  • mishap could potentially result in a $500 fine as well.

  • It's not often that a state bans...banning something

  • In 2013, New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg was well-known for his health regulations.

  • He banned giant-size sodas and required restaurants to post their calorie counts.

  • Well, in Mississippi they didn't like that.

  • So soon afterward, they passed a law nicknamed the Anti-Bloomberg Bill that explicitly banned

  • towns in the state from requiring nutritional information on menus.

  • The law is still in effect eight years later, as Mississippi takes a stand to prevent diners

  • from knowing too much about what goes into that giant plate of barbecue.

  • You wouldn't think a law would be needed to keep this game from getting rowdy.

  • Ah, Bingo.

  • A nice, relaxing game of chance where the elderly come to win prizes and feel the thrill

  • of victory.

  • It's all fun and games, at least until Myrtle and Ethel call Bingo a half-second apart and

  • the canes go flying.

  • That's why in North Carolina, it is illegal to sell or consume any alcoholic beverage

  • in a place where Bingo is being played.

  • And it doesn't fall under a general rule banning alcohol around games of chance, either

  • - they passed a law specifically about Bingo.

  • What did Myrtle do?

  • But they're not as strict as their neighbor to the south.

  • South Carolina has a pretty involved juvenile justice code.

  • Don't want those kids to get out of control, after all.

  • These laws usually don't carry hefty criminal charges, instead charging the kids withstatus

  • offenseswhere they usually get released home to their parents and have to face a judge.

  • Most are common sense, covering things like truancy or curfews.

  • But the law goes out of its way to ban one popular activity - playing pinball.

  • Maybe it was too close to gambling for their tastes, or maybe they just really don't

  • like the songPinball Wizard”, but if you're a kid in South Carolina, stay away

  • from those flippers.

  • But it's not the most unusual bit of recreation banned in a US state.

  • In the great state of Louisiana, there are some tough and hardy men.

  • So tough, in fact, that they feel like testing themselves in the sport of bear wrestling.

  • This is exactly what it sounds like - one or more people fighting a bear in a wrestling

  • match.

  • Now, we're willing to bet that not too many people do this activity twice, but enough

  • people try to take their lives in their hands that the state had to make it a crime to participate

  • in or train a bear for a wrestling match.

  • It carries a penalty of a fine of five hundred dollars and prison time of up to six months

  • - and, we're betting, a strange look from the judge at sentencing.

  • These are the oddest state laws - but the federal government gets in on the action too.

  • Are you someone who likes to live on the edge?

  • If you're planning on skydiving any time soon, you should be able to do it legally

  • - just don't drink too much before you do it.

  • Sure, it might be tempting to have a few to take the edge off those nerves, but it's

  • considered a federal crime.

  • Who knows why - after all, what's the worst that could happen when a drunk person falls

  • from an extreme height and has to remember to pull that parachute in time?

  • We just hate to think about why this law was passed.

  • If you're a food lover, you might be surprised by just how involved the feds are in your

  • dinner plate.

  • You bite into an onion ring, and somehow this just doesn't taste right!

  • Looking at it closely, it seems to be missing theringpart.

  • The breaded circle is actually filled with diced onions!

  • The restaurant didn't just commit a culinary faux pas, they may have committed a federal

  • crime - violating a statute that regulates the content of onion rings and requires restaurants

  • to disclose it if they're using dried or diced onions.

  • We don't know why the federal government got involved here, but maybe one Congressman

  • had some really bad onion rings.

  • The government takes food seriously - including lunchmeat.

  • Have you ever eaten Turkey Ham?

  • Wait, how can something be both a turkey and a ham?

  • This popular cold cut is usually a formed, cured loaf of dark meat turkey that looks

  • a little like ham, and the government wants to make sure no one gets confused.

  • That's why the labeling of this lunch meat is strictly regulated.

  • The wordsturkeyandhamcan't be in different orders or fonts so that no

  • one will think they're actually advertising pork or regular turkey.

  • That's a lot of restrictions for meat most commonly seen as the second of four in a turkey

  • variety pack.

  • But there's one condiment the government takes even more seriously.

  • Nothing can ruin a sandwich or a pile of fries more than opening a bottle of ketchup - and

  • it's runny.

  • The government agrees, so they regulate how fast the ketchup will flow out of the bottle

  • before it can be sold.

  • Using an instrument named a Bostwick consistometer, regulators make sure it can't travel more

  • than fourteen centimeters in thirty seconds.

  • If it exceeds that, it gets labeled substandard.

  • They also regulate the name of the condiment - and any form of ketchup, catsup, or catchup

  • are acceptable.

  • Who calls ketchup catchup?

  • This next law might disappoint would-be supervillains everywhere.

  • It's illegal to influence the weather.

  • But it's also impossible to do that...right?

  • Well, besides singing a song when it rains, the odds are no private citizen can - but

  • during the Vietnam War, the government was studying how to create weather events over

  • enemy lines to disrupt their troops.

  • This was seen by the government as very dangerous, and they did not want that information to

  • come out.

  • So they passed a law making it illegal to modify the weather without notifying the Secretary

  • of Commerce, to the tune of a fine of $10000.

  • So now sci-fi weather machines are only the purview of the government.

  • Yay?

  • You probably never even thought about breaking this next law - we hope.

  • If a horse passes you by on the street and splashes you with mud, you might get a little

  • angry.

  • You might even be tempted to make an angry gesture.

  • But if you do it in the wrong place, that might be a federal crime.

  • It's illegal to make anunreasonable gestureto a passing horse on federal land,

  • which means you can flip that horse the bird all you want on the streets of New York.

  • But what's an unreasonable gesture is up to interpretation, which is why the federal

  • government eventually amended the law to make it...not much less vague.

  • Just don't do anything that isn't “prudentwhen that horse passes.

  • The federal government is very involved with animals - but maybe no more than this next

  • case.

  • Falcons.

  • Why is the federal government so interested in falcons?

  • These smart birds can be trained by talented falconers for hunting, and the government

  • strictly regulates how many falcons a person can own and how they must be treated.

  • But oddly, there's also regulation on how falconry can be portrayed in the media.

  • Trained birds of prey cannot appear in movies unless it concerns the hobby or relevant issues

  • involving birds of prey.

  • And the handlers cannot be paid for the bird's role in the film.

  • This has led filmmakers who want to use falcons in their movies to go for a simpler solution

  • - computer-generated birds.

  • For more on weird laws, check outCrazy Laws That Still Exist Around the World”,

  • or watch this video instead.

You're woken up by a bang at the door.

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Insane Laws that Still Exist in USA

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    Summer posted on 2021/09/01
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