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  • Ever wonder how crazy World War 2 was?

  • Well, here's some world war 2 weapons so crazy, you probably never heard of them before!

  • #10.

  • Krummlauf Curved Barrel Rifle

  • In war, you often have seconds to react to an enemy.

  • You turn around the corner - and you're met with a barrage of fire that can gun you

  • down before you have time to pull the trigger.

  • But what if there was a way to shoot without turning the corner?

  • The German war machine thought it was possible when they created the Krummlauf, an attachment

  • for the Sturmgewehr 44 rifle.

  • Featuring a periscope viewing device and a curved barrel, the goal was to allow soldiers

  • to see and shoot around corners while shielded.

  • The idea was sound - but there were a lot of issues with the final product.

  • The bent barrel attachments underwent enormous stress every time the gun was fired, as the

  • barrel had to withstand the pressure of a speeding bullet as it curved.

  • They would wear out after only three hundred rounds - far from ideal for a tense firefight.

  • Even worse, the bullets underwent pressure as well and could shatter, leading them to

  • come out of the barrel in shrapnel - possibly injuring the shooter or their allies.

  • The mirror of the periscope was also vulnerable to fogging.

  • The designers tried to adapt the attachment with shields and vent holes, but ultimately

  • the Krummlauf was just...crummy.

  • But it was better for the user than this next weapon.

  • #9.

  • Kamikaze Bomb

  • Kamikaze pilots were a key part of Japan's war strategy, using pilots who deliberately

  • crashed their planes into enemy targets and sacrificed themselves.

  • But they were only as strong as their planes - so the Japanese army decided to give them

  • deadlier weapons.

  • The Yokosuka MXY-7 Ohka was the first plane designed for one-way trips - a rocker-piloted,

  • human-guided flying bomb that would be aimed at aircraft carriers.

  • It was one of the fastest Japanese planes ever designed, and delivered a much bigger

  • punch than a standard Kamikaze plane.

  • But it sacrificed function for strength.

  • Because the planes weren't intended to come back, they didn't have the range of other

  • planes.

  • They needed to be brought near their target by bomber planes - which could then be picked

  • off by American forces before the MXY-7 could hit its target.

  • When they did hit their target, they did serious damage - but rarely enough to sink major US

  • vessels.

  • They were mostly used in the attempt by the allies to retake Okinawa, and their impact

  • was minor.

  • The Japanese tried to refine it to make it stronger and more effective - but time ran

  • out and the war ended.

  • This next item struck fear into the enemy - but that's about all it did.

  • #8.

  • Gustav Rail Cannon

  • The soldiers defending the French maginot line hear a massive rumble, and soon - over

  • the hill - a monstrosity appears.

  • It's a rail cannon, almost impossibly large.

  • A hundred and fifty feet in length, with a barrel of a hundred feet alone.

  • It looks like a metal dinosaur - and it roars like one as well.

  • It fires the heaviest artillery shells around, and its range can hit targets from far larger

  • distances than other guns.

  • This is the Schwerer Gustaf railway gun - and its image struck terror into the hearts of

  • the Allies.

  • But the reality was far more complicated.

  • Hitler liked big, menacing weapons, and was quickly won over by the Gustaf's impressive

  • design.

  • The military command was less impressed.

  • Yes, the Gustaf delivered a powerful punch, but the effort needed to operate it was massive.

  • It needed to be transported in parts and assembled and mounted on site - which took four thousand

  • soldiers.

  • And it was so expensive to build that the Nazis deployed anti-aircraft units to defend

  • them.

  • It's not a surprise that only a few were ever created - the investment wasn't worth

  • the result.

  • But the Nazis had another weapon that was much smaller - but no less deadly.

  • #7.

  • Goliath Tracked Mine

  • Land mines are one of the most feared weapons of war, being buried and waiting for an enemy

  • soldier or tank to go over them - and then blowing them to bits.

  • But what if the mines weren't sitting ducks?

  • What if they could come for the enemy?

  • Research was ongoing since World War I, as German engineers experimented with small tracked

  • vehicles that could be remote-controlled to deliver bombs.

  • Early attempts failed, but later versions were equipped with high explosives of up to

  • 220 pounds and could be sent to target tanks.

  • But there were some major downsides to these new weapons.

  • First, they were single-use devices - similar to kamikaze planes but without the living

  • pilot.

  • Second, remote-control technology was still rudimentary and steering wasn't particularly

  • accurate - meaning the best strategy was simply to aim them and hope for the best.

  • Third, they were expensive to produce, and while over 7,500 were produced, they were

  • too big and unwieldy to be effective weapons.

  • They're an interesting artifact of the war, but armies found it much more effective to

  • stick to traditional land mines.

  • Other attempts to replace land mines were much more controversial.

  • #6.

  • Mine Dogs

  • One of the most vicious battlefronts of the war was Russia, where German tanks were invading

  • after betraying their former ally.

  • The Russians were suffering heavy casualties and were outgunned by the Nazis' superior

  • firepower - so they turned to an unconventional method of anti-tank warfare.

  • There was no shortage of dogs in Russia, and so the army tried to turn them into unique

  • kamikaze weapons.

  • They would hide food under German tanks, strap small explosives to the dogs' backs, and

  • send them to trigger their bombs under the tanks.

  • Heck of a way to treat man's best friend.

  • But it wasn't just animal lovers who found problems with this plan.

  • Dogs are living beings, and that means they can be unpredictable.

  • While the basics of the plan worked - and even took out a few German tanks - it's

  • impossible to ensure accuracy with animals.

  • Some dogs simply ran off - and worse, some got spooked and ran back to their Russian

  • handlers and detonated the explosives there.

  • But the success rate was enough that the program continued through the war, with other countries

  • training dogs too.

  • Russia even had a program for training bomb-equipped dogs through 1996.

  • It wasn't the only plan to use animals as bombs - but this next one had an unexpected

  • ending.

  • #5.

  • Explosive Rats

  • France had fallen, and Prime Minister Winston Churchill was desperate to prevent Great Britain

  • from following suit.

  • His weapons design team came up with a bizarre plan - turning rats into plastic explosives.

  • Rats would be killed and skinned, with their empty carcass then being filled with plastic

  • explosives and shaped to resemble an actual rat before being sewn up.

  • They would then be placed near German boilers, where they would be thrown for disposal - triggering

  • a massive explosion that could devastate German factories.

  • It didn't work out quite like that.

  • The first shipment of explosive rats were sent out - and quickly discovered by the Nazis.

  • The British dropped the plans and didn't make any more rats, but the Germans didn't

  • know that.

  • They were shocked by the carefully hidden explosives, and ordered an extensive search

  • for dead rats at every military school and facility.

  • They spent so much time examining dead rats that the British military authorities said

  • the plan actually succeeded, because they caused more trouble to the Germans than if

  • the rats had actually exploded.

  • But that wasn't the most bizarre plan to use animals as weapons.

  • #4.

  • Bird and Bat Bombs

  • It was only a short time after Pearl Harbor, and a Pennsylvania dentist named Lytle S.

  • Adams was outraged.

  • He wanted revenge, and he wrote to FDR with a plan - train bats as bombs.

  • But instead of calling the authorities, military officials looked at his plan and thought there

  • might be something to it.

  • Hibernating bats would be attached to timed explosive devices, and dropped over Japan

  • at dawn.

  • The bats would settle in the upper levels of buildings and the devices would go off

  • while they slept - turning Japanese cities into firestorms.

  • While demonstrations were carried out, the plan never went into effect - maybe because

  • some bats got away and blew up a General's car.

  • But it wasn't the only flying bomb plan the military had - and the next had a major

  • mind behind it.

  • BF Skinner was a pioneer in the field of psychology, but he also was passionate about training

  • pigeons.

  • He believed they could be a weapon of war, even more so than as messengers.

  • He had trained them to pull levers, and believed this system could be rigged to deliver a kamikaze

  • bomb to its target.

  • The pigeons would be trained to recognize a target and would peck to guide the missile

  • towards it.

  • A successful demonstration was pulled off - but like the bat project, as the war went

  • on the military shifted their focus to more traditional weaponry, and both pigeons and

  • bats breathed a little safer.

  • But in 1944, terror came from the skies in a different way.

  • #3.

  • Fu-Go Balloon Bomb

  • Aside from Pearl Harbor, very few attacks during World War 2 hit the United States directly

  • - but in 1944, a bizarre Japanese attack changed that.

  • It was one of the lowest-tech attacks imaginable - paper balloons that would be guided not

  • by any engine, but by the Pacific Ocean's jet stream.

  • But the payload they held would be anything but low-tech - they carried incendiary bombs

  • designed to kill anyone nearby and create dangerous wildfires.

  • They were actually the first weapons ever to have an intercontinental range.

  • And when they landed, chaos ensued.

  • Initially, the bombs caused little damage, but as they surfaced around the West Coast

  • of the United States, people panicked.

  • Reports of balloons landing around the country spread, and the government created a press

  • blackout to avoid widespread fear.

  • That ended on May 5th, 1945 when a bomb landed in Southern Oregon and blew up - killing a

  • woman and five children from a nearby church.

  • An investigation revealed that the bomb had been sitting there, untouched for weeks until

  • the picnicking group disturbed it and set off the lethal explosion - believed to be

  • the only WW2 death on mainland US soil.

  • But not all WW2 weapons were meant to be deadly.

  • #2.

  • Who, Me?

  • Private Ernest Crocker came into the military as a trained chemist, and that gave him a

  • unique position - designing poison gas for possible military use.

  • But the military had another mission in mind for him.

  • Remember those exploding stink bombs you used to play with as a kid?

  • What if they could be mega-sized and create a scent so horrible it would send the enemy

  • forces fleeing?

  • Well, some might say this plan stinks - but the US government didn't think so, and funded

  • the project that would be nicknamed the US military's fart bomb.

  • But to develop this weapon, Private Crocker had some unpleasant times ahead.

  • He needed to create a bomb that would deliver the worst smells imaginable - and that meant

  • testing.

  • He combined smells including vomit, urine, rotten eggs, human feces, and rancid dairy

  • into a single package - and the workers at Maryland Research Laboratory who had to mass-produce

  • it were no doubt smelling it for years.

  • The German army was ultimately spared its effects, because the war ended before the

  • stinky spray could be deployed.

  • But this valuable work led Private Crocker to become a pioneer in the field of sensory

  • science.

  • But one weapon delivered in every way - but the one that mattered most.

  • #1.

  • The Great Panjandrum

  • The final years of World War II saw a lot of experimentation in the British ranks, as

  • they created increasingly outlandish designs for weapons - most of which never saw the

  • light of day.

  • But one, the Panjandrum, would go down in history as one of the most bizarre weapons

  • ever created.

  • To the untrained eye, it didn't look like much - a big pair of interconnected wheels.

  • But it was actually a highly sophisticated weapon - a massive rocket-propelled rolling

  • cart designed to deliver an explosive payload to the Nazis.

  • But reality doesn't live up to the hype sometimes.

  • The Panjandrum would have been the fastest weapon of its size ever created, designed

  • to penetrate ten-foot walls by traveling at sixty miles per hour right through them.

  • This British super-weapon became famous before it hit the battlefield, with citizens attending

  • tests to witness their newest war machine in action.

  • But it never quite lived up to its potential.

  • Sometimes it's rockets went off unexpectedly, sometimes it went in the wrong direction - a

  • problem when you're dealing with a massive destructive rolling tank.

  • It was never used in combat, but it maintained a fanbase among military buffs.

  • On the 65th anniversary of Normandy, a replica was designed and tested - and that too, failed

  • miserably.

  • Alas, Great Panjandrum, you were maybe too spectacular for the real world.

  • Check outMost Badass New Weapons of the Yearfor what weapons designers are creating

  • now, or watchMost Advanced and Deadly Weapon on the Planetfor a look at maybe

  • the most successful ever designed.

Ever wonder how crazy World War 2 was?

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Weirdest World War 2 Weapons You Never Heard Of

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    Summer posted on 2021/08/13
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