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  • The world's a tough place, and sooner or later you're going to get hurt.

  • Today, we're going to look at how to survive the most common injuries you may suffer in

  • your life.

  • 4.

  • Stabbing

  • Getting stabbed sucks- we know, because we asked our resident challenge expert about

  • his run-in with the wrong end of a sharp knife, and we'll let him explain:

  • I was overseas, door-to-door stuff.

  • Went through a door at the exact same time as a bad guy coming out, we both surprised

  • each other and as we ran into each other we both dropped our rifles.

  • I went for my side arm, he went for his knife.

  • I was just a second slower on the draw than him because of my body armor and the way I

  • landed, and he pounced and slid a short knife into my side straight into my armpit.

  • So what's the best way to survive being stabbed, whether on purpose or on accident?

  • First, the best way to survive being stabbed is to not get stabbed.

  • If someone pulls a knife on you, it's time to turn heels and elbows in the opposite direction.

  • Don't try to be a hero or a Billy Badass, and just book it.

  • But what if there's nowhere to run?

  • In that case, remember the 5 Ds of Dodgeball: Dodge, Duck, Dip, Dive, and Dodge.

  • But alright, you forgot the 5 Ds of dodgeball and you couldn't run away, how are you going

  • to survive a stabbing?

  • First, if you're able to, try to direct the stab into somewhere favorable.

  • The human body is basically entirely a no-stab zone, but if you must, there's better places

  • to direct an incoming stab than others.

  • Places to avoid include your flanks, which will allow a knife to penetrate deeply and

  • pierce one or more organs.

  • A stab in the upper flank is especially dangerous, and our lab rat is lucky that the incoming

  • stab was in a generally upwards direction that completely missed his lungs.

  • Lungs are extremely allergic to being stabbed, but a stab into the lungs has two-fold dangers.

  • First, you'll compromise the lung's ability to remain inflated and do its job, meaning

  • you've seriously compromised your ability to breathe.

  • Secondly, a punctured lung can fill with blood, leading to disastrous secondary effects to

  • your health like a rapid death, or a slow, gurgling death as you choke to death on your

  • own blood while asphyxiating.

  • So where do you want to take a stab?

  • If you're able to, put up your forearms to block or deflect the incoming blow.

  • Even if the knife slips past your guard, you'll take a lot of the kinetic energy out of the

  • attack, limiting the penetrating power of the stab.

  • You'll probably get your forearms slashed to ribbons, but better that then taking a

  • knife through the ribs.

  • By the way, prepare for some intense pain if the knife manages to ram straight into

  • your forearm bones.

  • A less ideal, but more survivable location to take a stab is in the stomach.

  • Stomach injuries are excruciatingly painful, but very survivable if you can get medical

  • attention within 30 minutes to an hour.

  • The recovery process will be extremely long, and you run the risk of serious internal infection

  • if your stomach is ruptured and the contents spill out inside you.

  • After you've been stabbed, whether on purpose or by accident, the next important thing is

  • to administer first aid as quickly as possible.

  • If the impaling object is still sticking inside you, resist the urge to go all Rambo and rip

  • it out.

  • Instead, leave the object inside you and wrap a bandage around it, pressing firmly to stop

  • or slow the bleeding.

  • Pulling out the impaling object will open the wound up- as long as it's inside you it's

  • basically sealing the wound.

  • If you've been stabbed or impaled in the chest, the most important thing is to seal the wound

  • as quickly as possible.

  • That's because if air gets into your chest cavity, it can fill up the chest cavity and

  • put pressure on the lung, which prevents it from expanding fully.

  • This is known as a collapsed lung, and will lead to asphyxiation.

  • A good way to treat a sucking chest wound is to use a piece of plastic directly on the

  • hole, and then press firmly using gauze, or a dish rag, or a piece of torn t-shirt- whatever

  • is handy to staunch the bleeding.

  • 3.

  • Getting Shot

  • Maybe you're hanging out at a shooting range, or an American public school, and suddenly

  • it happens- you get plugged.

  • How are you going to survive getting shot?

  • First, it's important to assess the situation and get yourself to safety.

  • Is whoever shot you still shooting at you or at the general area?

  • Ask them politely to stop.

  • If they refuse, get to safety.

  • No point surviving your first gunshot wound only to have to deal with an immediate second.

  • Next, it's time to apply some immediate first aid, because unlike a stabbing, a gunshot

  • wound is typically exponentially more destructive to your internals.

  • That's thanks to the massive shock and expansion your body experiences as a round penetrates,

  • which can result in the creation of a brief internal cavity which your organs 'snap' back

  • into.

  • You're going to be experiencing major blood loss, which if you don't take immediate steps

  • to address will have you unconscious in as little as 30 seconds, and dead in 60.

  • So no matter how much bleeding there is or isn't, always treat a gunshot wound as if

  • you'll be unconscious and helpless in 30 seconds- which means move fast.

  • If you grew up in the 80s and 90s, immediately forget everything you saw in movies about

  • digging the bullet out.

  • First of all, it's in no way immediately important to remove a bullet.

  • Second, the bullet will likely have fragmented into dozens of tiny pieces requiring delicate

  • surgery to find and extract.

  • Third, sticking a knife inside you to dig out a bullet is a good way to compliment a

  • bullet wound with a stab wound.

  • The first thing you'll want to do is to stop or slow the bleeding.

  • Immediately apply pressure to the wound with your hands, while you- or a buddy- tries to

  • find more suitable bandaging material.

  • Once more, improvisation is key- a torn t-shirt, wad of paper towels, your annoying friend's

  • screenplay they won't shut up about... the only thing that matters is that the material

  • is absorbent enough to take in some of the blood and seal the wound tightly.

  • Ideally you'll want to use clean material, but a dirty dishrag lying in an alley will

  • do in a pinch.

  • You can deal with a blood infection after you've stopped littering the streets with

  • said blood.

  • Now, maintain pressure- and whatever you do, do not change the bandaging until a doctor

  • or EMT does it for you.

  • Even if you used a filthy rag and later find something much cleaner and are worried about

  • infection- ripping off the bandaging will tear loose the blood clot that's hopefully

  • forming to help keep your kool-aid on the inside.

  • Now that you've got your immediate wound taken care of, check for an exit wound.

  • Odds are when you get shot your body is going to respond with adrenaline, steroids, and

  • a whole lot of natural painkillers.

  • Given enough blood loss and a state of mental shock, you might not even feel any pain.

  • Many soldiers have died after having one wound treated, only to ignore the second wound they

  • didn't even realize they had.

  • That's right, the brain is a tricky thing, and if one wound is readily apparent but the

  • second isn't, it can completely shut off the pain signal from the second wound as it struggles

  • to deal with the shock of the first.

  • Plug your exit wound the same you would the entry wound, then make a move for safety or

  • help.

  • If help is already on its way, it's time to conduct a more thorough assessment.

  • Carefully inspect the rest of your body for additional gunshot wounds or secondary wounds,

  • and treat each accordingly.

  • We hope you're never in this situation, but we cannot stress enough how important this

  • step is.

  • If you've been shot in an extremity, elevate the wound while you wait for help.

  • Unless the wound is on your torso or your head, you also want to keep your head at the

  • lowest possible elevation.

  • This will ensure that gravity helps blood flow into your brain and keep you conscious

  • and alive.

  • 2.

  • Car Crash

  • Given the frequency of auto accidents, it's bound to happen.

  • Sooner or later you're going to be in a car crash, hopefully it'll be of a less severe

  • nature.

  • First, wear a seat belt.

  • Seriously, it's 2021 and we can't believe we still have to tell people to do this.

  • Wearing a seat belt can reduce your chances of a fatal injury by 45%, and of a moderate

  • to critical injury by 50%.

  • Seat belts are even more useful in trucks, where they reduce the risk of fatal injury

  • by 60% and moderate to critical injury by 65%.

  • It's not enough to just wear a seat belt though, you have to wear it properly.

  • The upper part that crosses your chest can be uncomfortable on long car rides, or maybe

  • it puts a total crimp in your style- but not wearing it can be just as bad as not wearing

  • a seat belt at all.

  • Even worse, wearing the lap band only can lead to very serious pelvic injuries, especially

  • for men who happen to like having a fully functional reproductive system.

  • Next, you want to sit as upright as possible in your seat.

  • Kicking your feet up on the dash is a great way to not only lose your feet, but have your

  • knees smash through your face and turn your brain to pudding.

  • If you're in the front seats, the deploying airbag can cause serious injuries to your

  • legs, and put you in a position that the subsequent crash will have a greater chance of catastrophic

  • spine or leg injuries.

  • Next, if you see the crash coming, avoid throwing your hands up in panic.

  • The deploying airbags could cause serious injuries to your arms, hands, and even face

  • in a game of 'stop hitting yourself' that the airbag will definitely win.

  • The best thing to do instead is to keep your body as loose as possible, instead of tensing

  • up in anticipation of the crash.

  • You've probably heard of newborn babies surviving incredible falls or car crashes with relatively

  • few injuries.

  • A big factor in their survival is the fact that babies remain loose, allowing their body

  • to better absorb and redistribute the incoming kinetic energy.

  • Once the vehicle has come to a stop, conduct an immediate safety assessment.

  • Even before you start tending to your or your passenger's wounds, you want to check the

  • environment to see if it's safe.

  • If the vehicle is on fire, or if you've landed in a ditch that's quickly filling with water,

  • your first priority is to get yourself to safety.

  • No point treating wounds if you're just going to burn to death or drown.

  • If your environment is safe, and your wounds are serious, remain in the vehicle.

  • Don't try to exit the vehicle as you could have spinal or head injuries you aren't aware

  • of.

  • It's generally best to remain in the vehicle until emergency services personnel extract

  • you themselves.

  • Only leave the vehicle if necessary for safety's sake, or to treat a life-threatening injury

  • with first aid.

  • This also applies if you find yourself at the scene of a car accident.

  • Leave the victim in the vehicle unless absolutely necessary to move them- always allow medical

  • personnel to make the decision to move an individual.

  • If you come across a car accident victim that has been ejected from the vehicle, the same

  • rule applies- move them only if there's a safety risk.

  • If possible, treat any life-threatening injuries without moving them, as once more you could

  • make a spine or head injury exponentially worse by moving the victim.

  • 1.

  • Acid

  • For the last decade there's been a persistent trend in men attacking women with acid, with

  • the goal of splashing it on their faces.

  • The aim of the attack isn't so much to kill, as it is to horribly maim and disfigure.

  • Whatever the cause of your run-in with acid is, knowing what to do can not only save your

  • life, but seriously reduce the scarring of an attack.

  • If the acid is in powder form, first try to reduce your exposure by vigorously brushing

  • it off your skin.

  • You can ideally do this with a shirt sleeve or a gloved hand, but vigorously brushing

  • it off with a bare hand will not leave much time for the acid to work on your flesh.

  • If the acid is in liquid form, don't attempt to brush it off with your hand or any other

  • body part, even if it's protected.

  • This will only spread the acid around, making treatment much more difficult and potentially

  • increasing future scarring and disfigurement.

  • Instead, immediately flush water over the affected area, and continue doing so until

  • emergency medical services arrive.

  • Water will help dilute the acid, and if applied quickly enough can help prevent permanent

  • disfigurement.

  • If water isn't available, use any other liquid on-hand.

  • Milk is also ideal, as it'll help neutralize the acid, as well as products with high concentration

  • of water such as beer.

  • The key is to pour as much liquid as possible for as long as possible, diluting and washing

  • away the acid.

  • If the acid has gotten into the eyes, immediately flush them with water and continue flushing

  • them with water until help arrives.

  • Make sure to pry open the eyelids and get water under the eyelids, as the acid can come

  • to rest there or be pushed there by the water.

  • Next, remove any clothing affected by the acid, and move from under the puddles formed

  • by the water treatment to prevent secondary injury to your feet or legs.

  • Now keep your survival skills sharp by checking out What you should do to survive in the wilderness,

  • or click this other video instead!

The world's a tough place, and sooner or later you're going to get hurt.

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B1 wound acid stab stabbed knife vehicle

How to Actually Survive Being Stabbed

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    Summer posted on 2021/07/25
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