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  • Picture a guy from the US who has decided it's time to spread his wings and get out

  • of the town he's pretty much never left.

  • He heads to some distant land he knows absolutely nothing about, and from the moment he gets

  • there, he's somehow incredibly popular.

  • No sooner than he's learned how to order a bottle of beer in the local language, he's

  • hooked up with someone.

  • But as some of you well-traveled viewers might know, what happens in the bedroom in the United

  • States might not happen everywhere.

  • This guy soon finds himself completely out of his depth and wondering what he's gotten

  • himself into.

  • Make sure you don't make the same mistake, by watching this to find out some of the most

  • confounding sexual practices you've ever heard in your life.

  • Let's start in Indonesia where there's a pilgrimage people take to a place called

  • Mount Kemukus, aka, Sex Mountain.

  • Every year folks from all across Indonesia head to this part of Central Java foryou

  • guessed it, sex

  • But it's more than just that.

  • It's sex with a complete stranger.

  • As the story goes, a long time ago a prince eloped from his town with a woman and tried

  • to have a fun time there.

  • They didn't quite finish the job, and were chased away by soldiers and later killed.

  • A kind of ritual has since emerged, which involves going there and meeting a stranger.

  • Only, this time, they have to do what the Prince and his lover couldn't and finish

  • the job.

  • And that's not all, they must continue to meet up and do so seven more times throughout

  • the year.

  • If they end up fulfilling the quota then they'll be blessed with good fortune.

  • Which we're sure is the only reason that men and women flock there, married or not,

  • to hook up with a stranger.

  • If you're thinking, no way that's a real thing, think again.

  • In 2014 the governor of the province of Central Java laid down restrictions on what happens

  • there.

  • He banned the practice, saying it was not moral and there was a risk of contracting

  • various diseases.

  • He also said it made Indonesia look bad in the eyes of other countries.

  • We'll let you decide if he was right about that last part.

  • Still, Indonesian news reports in 2017 said the stalls and huts erected for the deed had

  • reopened and people were getting it on for good luck once again.

  • You see, the business had been booming there before it was all closed down.

  • Many, many people enjoyed the freedom of the ritual, and in turn, that provided lots of

  • business for locals at sex mountain.

  • When the ritual was banned, they lost their means of making money.

  • The entry fee alone was around 50 cents, which doesn't sound like much, but on good nights

  • there were around 8,000 pilgrims.

  • In the past when huts and stalls weren't around, the people just did it behind trees,

  • so you could call the enterprising locals a good thing for everyone.

  • They even opened karaoke stalls to perhaps get people in the mood.

  • You might wonder if the fortune actually does shine down on the pilgrims after their year

  • of hooking up is over.

  • Well, one woman who'd partaken told Australian news, “Praise be to God, after coming here,

  • even though I have a few debts, my business is making a bit of a profit.”

  • Next up is a nomadic tribe in West Africa called the Wodaabe.

  • They don't have a written language themselves, but this word has been translated aspeople

  • of the taboo.”

  • What's taboo in many parts of the world is having more than one marriage partner,

  • which is known as polygamy.

  • This tribe doesn't mind at all though, and in fact, they embrace it.

  • Every year there is something called theGerewol festivaland during the big party that

  • happens the guys get dressed up to the nines to show their beauty.

  • In fact, this tribe might just think it has the most beautiful men in the world.

  • These people are also what you might call especially liberated, having no qualms about

  • the very natural things that often makes westerners blush.

  • The men, with painted faces and feathers on their heads, dance and look wonderful for

  • the onlooking women in the tribe.

  • It's said they take a kind of drink that helps them to dance for hours on end and also

  • provides a hypnotic effect.

  • It's like a very colorful beauty contest, because then the women will choose the most

  • attractive men.

  • If the women are partnered with someone already, no problem, they can put themselves forward

  • as someone who wants to steal another man as a new husband.

  • If they don't want to go all out and steal a guy, they can just elect to sleep with him.

  • If the guy walks past her, she just needs to brush him on the shoulder, and they will

  • be together.

  • It totally doesn't matter about the previous partner.

  • The guys don't get much say in the matter though.

  • There are some rules, however.

  • Usually, when a woman is old enough an arranged marriage will take place.

  • Once she becomes pregnant, she goes to live with her mom and can't see the husband.

  • After some time, she can go back to him, but she might just decide during the festival

  • to sleep with another guy or steal one.

  • One tribesman told National Geographic, “We go to the Gerewol for pleasure.

  • I get a woman then fine, it's a bonus.”

  • When a guy is incredibly hot, he's called, “kayeejo naawdo”, “hurting manbecause

  • he's so gorgeous it hurts to look at him.

  • Just to set things straight, you have the wordpolygamy”, which means marriage

  • between more than two people.

  • Then you havepolygyny”, which is when a man has more than one wife, and there's

  • polyandry' when a woman has more than one husband.

  • It's not all that common, but it happens in various parts of the world.

  • It's somewhat different from having a mistress, though.

  • In Thailand, a man may often take what the Thais call a “mia noywhich literally

  • means small wife, often called a second wife by westerners.

  • It's not actually legal in Thai law, but you have a documented marriage and you also

  • have an undocumented marriage in which a wedding ceremony still happens but nothing is officially

  • signed.

  • In the past when women had fewer opportunities this was widespread, but not so much now.

  • In 2021, a video went viral in Thailand that featured a man secretly marrying another wife.

  • The guy in question, a cop, got the shock of his life when his real wife's mother-in-law

  • walked into the ceremony and gave him a hard smack across his head.

  • The attending monks were less than impressed, but despite the chaos, the ceremony went ahead.

  • His real wife, who later showed news cameras their marriage certificate, was understandably

  • angry seeing as they'd been together 15 years and had two kids.

  • Believe it or not, in the past Thai women's magazines would say tolerating such a thing

  • was the mark of a good wife.

  • Maybe a small wife might be too much, but many Thai women have turned a blind eye to

  • a man for having what you might call a bit on the side, what Thais call a “gik.”

  • To understand this, you have to understand what some Thais now think of as outdated traditional

  • values.

  • These old values held that there was something calledkulasatri”, which meant an ideal

  • women.

  • She was demur, quiet, and certainly wasn't outwardly sexual.

  • She wasn't even meant to have sexual thoughts.

  • Meanwhile, male masculinity was defined by something calledchaai chatri”.

  • Under this, men were supposed to have irrepressible, uncontrollable sexual desires that could never

  • be limited to their one spouse.

  • It's doesn't seem fair to most of us, and wouldn't be seen as fair by most modern

  • Thais either, but it still happens...quite a lot.

  • This is evident in a Durex pole that had Thais top of the infidelity ratings, and before

  • you ask, this has nothing to do with Thailand's notorious red light districts, which only

  • actually make up a few streets in the entire country.

  • It's actually these old cultural values that pervade most of the nation and lead to

  • a culture of infidelity.

  • Not to say women will tolerate cheating these days, or at least the majority of women won't.

  • That's perhaps reflected in the fact that Thailand is arguably the leader in penis reattachment

  • surgery.

  • This has led to the international media asking why Thailand had anepidemic of penile

  • amputations.”

  • There's even an old saying men sometimes say to other men about which goes, “I better

  • get home or the ducks will have something to eat.”

  • The men are often hypocrites, too, given that many men have a zero tolerance when their

  • ideal woman cheats.

  • It can often, and does regularly, lead to him killing her.

  • You might wonder why the second-wives marry the guy.

  • It's often down to financial security or just the security of keeping him.

  • The first wife might not want to break up with the guy, either because women divorcing

  • men is frowned upon in traditional settings, or because she has limited opportunities in

  • life to take care of the family he will leave behind.

  • The woman whose mother whacked the cheating husband was well aware he had a “gik

  • but she turned a blind eye to it.

  • She told reporters, “I initially did not think that my husband would wed.

  • Before the wedding, he was still staying at home with me and told me he would be going

  • out to work a night shift at his station.”

  • In some cultures, having more than one spouse is not just accepted, it's normal.

  • Academic studies for instance have shown that in parts of India, China, and Nepal a woman

  • might have more than one husband.

  • One such paper published in 2019 was titled, “Marital Satisfaction and Well Being Among

  • Fraternal Polyandrous and Monogamous Tribal People of Kinnaur.”

  • Fraternal polyandry is when one woman is married to two or more brothers and Kinnaur is a district

  • in northern India.

  • The paper concluded this after spending time with some of these families: “The result

  • based on qualitative research revealed that that polyandrous couple's physical health,

  • economical and psychological well-being is better and they feel positive towards life.”

  • But why is that?

  • The paper said those families felt secure together and they had financial security.

  • It said a woman in those tribes with only one husband felt less financially secure than

  • a woman who had married two or more brothers.

  • The brothers also said they felt more secure.

  • The Toda tribe of South India have also practiced these kinds of marriages, but that may have

  • now stopped.

  • Still, it was explained that when a child is born to one of the brothers, he would hand

  • the wife a bow and arrow and become the father of the child.

  • If another child was born to another brother, he would do the same.

  • It certain regions of India, Nepal, and Tibet, various practices of polygamy happened throughout

  • history, although it's not common now.

  • In a northern part of India called Jaunsar-Bawar, in some places a woman would marry the eldest

  • son and then she immediately became the wife of all his younger brothers.

  • It got tricky, though, since the brothers could have more than one wife if their older

  • brother was much older and the age difference was vast between his brothers and the wife.

  • In that case, a brother could find his own new wife.

  • If all the brothers stayed together with the one wife, none of them had any kind of exclusive

  • right to her.

  • All brothers were seen as equal, and the kids looked on them as one father.

  • In some countries, in the recent past, such as in parts of Tibet, the eldest brother would

  • be seen as the main husband.

  • A study published in 2008 said among the villages of Xigaze and Qamdo in Tibet it was found

  • that 20 to 50 percent of families were made up of a wife and two husbands.

  • In some more remote areas, the researchers said 90 percent of the families were polyandric.

  • To understand why, just imagine how difficult life is in some of those unforgiving mountainous

  • areas.

  • Weird to us maybe, but arguably an act of survival for others.

  • Laws in Tibet have long since made it illegal, but the marriage will sometimes be documented

  • between the wife and just the eldest brother.

  • In most countries, a man's member is kept locked firmly behind closed doors where it's

  • barely noticeable unless he's wearing his favorite pair of tight speedos.

  • In some of the more remote parts of New Guinea though, that's not always the case.

  • There the penis can have its own clothing accessory.

  • This is called a Koteka, which looks something like a gourd and covers the penis while being

  • strapped to the waist.

  • It can be long and thin or short and wide and can point in any direction that the wearer

  • chooses.

  • Obviously, when a man is working, a smaller Koteka would be preferable.

  • If they are worn as a way of attracting a female though is still up for debate.

  • They might only be worn as a way of covering up as well as a way of looking good.

  • Still, you have to wonder if some women favor a bigger Koteka.

  • The Sambia people of Papua New Guinea are heavily focused on what you might refer to

  • as the warrior culture.

  • When the boys are very young, usually around the age of seven, they are taken away from

  • their mothers.

  • In some ways, this is to toughen them up and there are some comparisons to the training

  • known asPaidesin ancient Sparta.

  • But with the Sambia, it's because the boys need to be detached from what is believed

  • to be the contaminated blood of the mother.

  • It's said that in each woman there is something calledtingu”, which has the power to

  • manipulate men.

  • When the boy gets a little older he might be around younger women, who also have tingu

  • in their blood.

  • Since her tingu gets stronger during her menstrual period, during that time a woman is kept away

  • from males completely.

  • Ok, so if women have this sorcery that they can use to manipulate men, how do couples

  • ever get together?

  • Well, when the boys are old enough, they are taught how to safely have sex without being

  • trapped by a woman's tingu.

  • One way is to kind of disassociate himself from her and not get too heated in the act

  • of sex.

  • He should also try to prevent her from enjoying herself too much, lest she make him become

  • sick and he possibly die.

  • Once copulation is over, he goes through a blood-letting ceremony which is supposed to

  • decontaminate him of her tingu.

  • This happens until she gets pregnant, and then after she has the child he can become

  • a fully-fledged warrior.

  • In the 1990s people who visited these very remote tribes said times were apparently changing

  • though.

  • Supposedly something calledluv marriagewas occurring from time to time, and those

  • marriages didn't include all the fear and ceremony we've just described.

  • In a 2006 book, the writer called this shift nothing less thanrevolutionary.”

  • While many of take kissing for granted, the romantic, full-on, juices shared, lips-bitten

  • kind of affair is utterly disgusting to people in some cultures.

  • Researchers at the University of Nevada explained that when the Mehinaku of Brazil were asked

  • about kissing the general reply was that it was gross, with one asking why you would want

  • to share your dinner with someone.

  • Fair point, and let's be honest, no one wants to see anyone devouring each other's

  • tonsils on the subway.

  • In another paper, researchers found in some other cultures that there was also no kissing

  • at all.

  • The Aka pygmies didn't do it, and when questioned about sex they said it was basically to make