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  • The line between online and off is getting blurrier all the time.

  • There's so much data about everyone floating around out there that even crimes are being

  • solved just by looking at someone's online presence.

  • Now we know most of you are, like us, just regular, law abiding citizens who don't

  • want their information plastered all over the internet for anyone and everyone to find,

  • which is why we're so thankful to the sponsor of today's video, Kaspersky Privacy Checker.

  • Kaspersky Privacy Checker is the absolute best tool for taking back control over who

  • sees your information online, and protects you from becoming a victim through oversharing

  • on social media.

  • We've all seen the news stories about celebrities who were hacked through their social media.

  • These hacks and leaks can be devastating and career ruining, but could have been avoided

  • if they treated checking their data's privacy settings as a regular habit, like brushing

  • your teeth.

  • Kaspersky Privacy Checker is exactly that, an easy to use tool that should become part

  • of your regular routine.

  • It doesn't matter if I'm signing in to facebook, linkedin, or youtube, I'm always

  • checking to make sure I have the tightest possible privacy level enabled so I can stay

  • safe and worry free.

  • I strongly recommend that you go to the Kaspersky Privacy Checker website to do the same right

  • now, since once your data is leaked, there's nothing you can do about it.

  • It works on all the major social networks, any hardware including PC, Mac, and mobile,

  • and best of all, it's totally free!

  • So go follow the link in the description to learn more from Kaspersky on how to keep your

  • personal information to yourself!

  • Lives have been saved, mysteries have been unraveled, cold-blooded killers have leaked

  • information and gotten themselves caught.

  • As you'll see today, it's remarkable, horrifying, and sometimes funny how many crimes

  • have been solved by online sleuths.

  • Let's begin with something light that we'll put in the funny folder.

  • It all started when cops in Detroit said they were shutting down Six Mile Road for Angel's

  • Night.

  • That's the night volunteers patrol the city, a response to the mayhem of Devil's Night

  • in years past.

  • Anyway, when that announcement hit the department's Facebook page, one particular poster with

  • the name Champagne Torino wasn't very happy.

  • He wrote on that page, shut down that street and you are getting shut down.

  • Ok, a troll, just another big man hiding behind a fake name.

  • But then when he started saying come Halloween, I'm going to put something nasty inside

  • kids' candies, the cops looked a bit deeper into this Torino character.

  • Let's just say that Mr. Torino wasn't the brightest kid on the block and in no time

  • at all the police found out that he was named Michael Zaydel.

  • What's more, the 21-year old had outstanding warrants for a DUI and also assault and battery.

  • The cops got in touch with him on Facebook, after which Zaydel offered them a deal that

  • was hard to refuse.

  • He said, ok, you got me, but if you want me to hand myself in, I'll do it on the condition

  • you get one of your posts shared a thousand times.

  • What's more, he said, I'll come into the station loaded with donuts for you.

  • The department posted a picture and asked people to share it, with added information

  • about the challenge.

  • It went viral, and we mean globally.

  • Soon after, Zaydel walked into the station with a bag of glazed donuts.

  • Crime solved.

  • He got 39 days in jail.

  • Ok, this one isn't funny at all, but it has a nice ending.

  • In 1995, two young men in Virginia were out driving when they crashed.

  • Both men died.

  • The driver, a 21-year old named Michael Hager had fallen asleep and the car hit a tree.

  • But what about the other guy, who was he?

  • The police didn't know, and they still didn't know after investigating.

  • One thing they did know was that he was a Grateful Dead fan.

  • He had two tickets in his pocket for one of their gigs and he was wearing one of their

  • t-shirts.

  • He was also wearing Levi's and Fila running shoes.

  • Cops found a note, too.

  • It read, “Jason, Sorry we had to go, see ya around, call me #914-XXXX.

  • Caroline T. & Caroline O. Bye!!!!.”

  • That number had no area code and led to no great discovery.

  • Police did manage to find where the tickets had been bought, but it turned out the seller

  • was just a scalper.

  • He couldn't remember selling the tickets.

  • Police also knew the dead man was about 20 years old, with long, brown curly hair.

  • He had two tattoos that looked like they'd been scribbled rather than done by a professional.

  • His teeth were in tip-top shape.

  • Still, with all this information, they just couldn't get a name.

  • Hager, it turned out, had likely picked up the mystery man while he was hitchhiking.

  • Hager's family said they knew nothing about a guy that fit that description.

  • The police named him Jason Doe.

  • It was a confounding mystery that really shouldn't have been.

  • Some young man had just disappeared and not one person came forward and said anything.

  • One thing the police did was create an image of what the guy likely looked like, also wearing

  • that tie-dyed Grateful Dead t-shirt.

  • They posted that on the National Center for Missing & Exploited Children database.

  • Years passed and nothing happened.

  • Then an Australian Reddit user who was into unsolved mysteries read about the case.

  • She decided to start the threadGrateful Doeand posted the reconstructed image

  • and information about him.

  • One day she looked in her Inbox and found a message from a guy named Steve.

  • He said, I think I know that guy.

  • His name is Jason Callahan, I used to share a room with him.

  • Not long after, Jason Callahan's half-sister was found with the help of Redditors.

  • You have to remember, this was 20 years after the accident, so she hadn't known Jason.

  • But she said this later, “When I looked at that picture, it looked like my dad was

  • looking back at me.

  • He had the same face.

  • And he even had a lot of my facial featuresmy forehead and the shape of my face.

  • I knew in that moment, deep down, who that was.”

  • DNA tests proved it was him.

  • Jason had been found.

  • It turned out that he'd told his family those many years ago that he was leaving home

  • and going to follow the Grateful Dead around America.

  • His mother hadn't filed a missing person's report, but she did after she saw those Reddit

  • posts.

  • This next one is equally sad, but again there is some light in the darkness.

  • This is the story of a woman who lived in a small town called Eatonville in Pierce County,

  • Washington.

  • Her name was Susan Rainwater, and she was married to Al, a very devoted husband.

  • They might have been getting on in years, but they kept fit, often walking together

  • while holding hands.

  • One morning, Susan got up and made some coffee.

  • She brought a cup to her sleeping husband and as usual, told him that she'd be back

  • in a bit after she finished her morning bicycle ride.

  • She never returned.

  • 30 years of marriage and Al never saw her alive again.

  • When he did see her the next time it was when he went looking for her.

  • She was dead in a ditch.

  • It was a hit and run, or seemed like one.

  • Al later said, “I was always worried about her, and she was always worried about me.”

  • No one had seen the accident.

  • But then forward-thinking state trooper Robert Reyer took to Twitter.

  • He posted a picture of the mangled bike and he also posted a tiny bit of black material

  • that had presumably come off the car.

  • To most people that bit of material could have been anything, but avid car enthusiasts

  • are not most people.

  • Responses came back, such asLikely trim from a pop-up headlight, or an old 80s truck

  • headlight.”

  • And then someone said, “1983-84 chevy silverado headlamp bezel.”

  • Sometime later, someone posted the image on Reddit under r/WhatIsThisThing.

  • The user JeffsNuts didn't waste any time in replying.

  • He knew his stuff.

  • He said what he saw was a part of the headlight bezel from a late-1980s Chevrolet C/K pickup.

  • In 2018 there weren't too many of those around anymore.

  • He even talked about a certain notch that was peculiar to one exact model.

  • He then went back to watching football on TV.

  • He said it was actually totally random that he even answered the question about the image.

  • He'd just happened to see it, and had no idea about the terrible crime.

  • That same trooper got back on Reddit a few days later.

  • His message was this: “Detectives made an arrest today for Thursday's

  • fatal bicyclist hit and run in Eatonville.

  • Reddit users identify a photographed broken car part as a mid-1980s Chevy truck headlight

  • assembly.”

  • The guy said he'd fallen asleep at the wheel, although judging by the heroin in his possession

  • when he was caught, maybe he'd gouged out.

  • He said he knew he'd hit someone, but didn't want to see a body.

  • He was charged with vehicular homicide.

  • When the victim's daughter spoke to the press, she said, “She didn't deserve to

  • be left on the side of the road with no one to help her because all she ever did was help

  • other people.”

  • As sad as it was, in a kind of way she was helped too after her death.

  • On another positive note, this is what someone wrote below the trooper's post: “Look

  • at the internet today, being all useful and everything.”

  • As you'll now see, the Internet can also get you in trouble.

  • This is a very short story.

  • You can call it a cautionary tale, or perhaps a modern-day parable.

  • There was a man, a Florida man, and his name was Johnson.

  • He was just 19.

  • Mr. Johnson thought it was a good idea to post photos of himself on Instagram holding

  • guns in his hands.

  • There's nothing wrong with that of course, but if you've draped yourself in gold and

  • you're sometimes holding wads of notes, well, you might bring attention to yourself,

  • especially if you have a criminal record and don't have a license for those guns.

  • In fact, this kid had previous convictions for grand theft, burglary, and being a felon

  • in possession of a firearm.

  • Then there were all the recent robberies in the area where he lived.

  • So, after seeing his Instagram page, cops paid him a visit.

  • They found stolen electronic goods, stolen guns, stolen jewelry, and $250,000 in cash.

  • It was said this man had committed up to 40 burglaries where he lived.

  • He later amassed 142 charges.

  • When cops asked him what his job was, he replied, “thief.”

  • At least he was honest.

  • That one was hardly a difficult crime to solve, but this one was even easier, thanks to teens

  • who risked everything to get some attention online.

  • It was hardly the crime of the century.

  • Two young guys went on a rampage and vandalized just about everything in their sight, from

  • a school, to cars, to a nearby restaurant.

  • They even walked up to people eating at restaurants and blasted them with a stolen fire extinguisher.

  • They ran around, jumping on cars and just being a nuisance.

  • Everything they did they posted on Snapchat and the videos were seen by the public.

  • Let's just say they didn't get away with their crimes for long.

  • Both were charged with five felonies and four misdemeanors.

  • Ok, back to more serious crimes.

  • This one involves some hateful folks getting brought down by clever people on Twitter.

  • In 2014, two men in their 20s in Philadelphia were walking down the street when some guys

  • started insulting them about their sexuality.

  • The insults then turned to fists and the two men were severely beaten, one so badly his

  • jaw had to be wired.

  • Police decided to release the surveillance video online, after which a lot of disgusted

  • people took to Twitter.

  • They started sharing photos of that night and discussing timelines.

  • This led to the Twitter sleuths believing they had the men in a photo at a restaurant

  • close to where the beating happened.

  • They got in touch with the police.

  • The guy that posted the photo said he got it from a friend of a friend of a friend.

  • It just so happened that he had thousands of followers and between them, they had many

  • thousands more.

  • As one person put it, this exploded the internet.

  • Someone then used something called a Facebook Graph Search to see who had checked into that

  • restaurant around the time of the photo.

  • This led to some names being mentioned.

  • They sent their information to the Philadelphia Police Department.

  • Soon after, local news media tweeted, “Suspects in gay couple bashing attack in court today.”

  • Three people were charged with aggravated assault, simple assault, and recklessly endangering

  • another person.

  • This next one deserves its own movie.

  • In 2001 a retired trucker named Ronald Telfer pulled into a truck stop in Missouri, He saw

  • what looked like an abandoned bucket and thought nothing of it.

  • The next time he was back there the bucket was in the same place.

  • He kind of needed a bucket, so he went over to it.

  • It was full of concrete, so he hit the bucket against a wall.

  • At that moment he smelled something awful.

  • On inspection, it looked like inside the bucket there was meat and skin, albeit rotten.

  • He thought it must be from a dead animal, so he just emptied it and took it home to

  • use for feeding his pigs.

  • About a month later a guy named Franklin Ray Dean was at the truck stop when he noticed

  • what looked like a concrete cylinder, only when he got close he saw hair coming out of

  • it.

  • The police were called.

  • They had a dead man on their hands and it was likely a murder case.

  • Sometime later, a woman named Ellen Leach saw an image online that was a representation

  • of the skull that had been found.

  • She was a web sleuth and a very good one, but a skull wasn't much to go on.

  • It wasn't for police, either, who'd had no luck with their investigation.

  • Leach then spent day and night looking at the websites of medical examiners and police

  • departments.

  • She spent months and months looking at the image of the skull and tried to imagine what

  • the man would have looked like.

  • This is a long and complicated story, but let's just say one day she saw a picture

  • of a missing person named Gregory May.

  • He was exactly what she'd been looking for.

  • Thanks to her hard work, a man named Douglas DeBruin, the best friend of the victim, was

  • charged with murder and sentenced to life without the possibility of parole.

  • It turned out he'd killed his friend to get hold of his valuable collection of Civil

  • War memorabilia.

  • Ok, now for the grizzliest story of all.

  • We're going to condense this story just in case you already know about it, but we

  • feel we couldn't do this show and completely leave it out.

  • In short, in 2010 a video appeared online of someone doing something unimaginable to

  • some cute kittens.

  • A Facebook group was started in an attempt to find the culprit.