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  • A high-ranking member of a violent Australian biker gang has his door kicked in by police.

  • Across the world in Germany, a group of contract killers is caught in a police ambush.

  • From Triad members in China to Sinaloa cartel members in the US, some of the world's worst

  • criminals are being dragged away in handcuffs- and all because of a messaging app.

  • This was the sting of all stings, or as the FBI said, it wasunprecedentedin the

  • world of crime.

  • Some 800 people belonging to the highest echelons of global organized crime spanning 18 different

  • nations found themselves in handcuffs.

  • At the time of writing, this is likely just the start of bigger things to come.

  • The FBI, along with cops all over Europe and the Australian police had been tracking the

  • goings-on of 300 organized crime groups in 90 countries, not to mention being privy to

  • what they calledhigh-level public corruption”.

  • But before we go any further, let's look at how this started.

  • As you know, if you want to move tons of drugs and weapons around the world you need a kind

  • of social network, but talking about shipping millions of dollars worth of cocaine to Europe

  • via countries in Africa on Facebook or WhatsApp wouldn't really work.

  • That's why criminals use specially-made encrypted apps.

  • In the past, this has worked to some extent.

  • Occasionally, law enforcement finds out about these private networks.

  • Take for instance the Canadian company Phantom Secure.

  • It supplied phones that had been modified to provide the utmost security.

  • The company didn't ask who its customers were, or at least that's what it said when

  • the cops bashed down the front doors.

  • It was discovered that one of those customers was the Sinaloa Cartel in Mexico, among many

  • other criminal syndicates around the world.

  • The CEO of the company, Vincent Ramos, was arrested but refused to give police a backdoor

  • into the encrypted network.

  • This didn't deter the cops, who later got hold of one of the developers.

  • Police had an idea, thinking, now there's a drought of such secure networks in the world,

  • why don't we get this developer on our side.

  • You see, he was already working on the next totally secure network for another company.

  • That network was called Anom.

  • Along with the Australian Federal Police, the FBI came up with a plan.

  • According to reports, the two agencies came up with this idea while drinking a few beers

  • with each other.

  • They said why not secretly distribute this developer's new technology and track it?

  • They paid him $120,000 and he didn't have to go to prison, or at least he got reduced

  • time.

  • His name of course remains a mystery, otherwise, he'd have some of the world's most dangerous

  • people on his back.

  • So, now that they had the technology they just had to get criminal organizations to

  • use the phones.

  • Those phones were pretty much useless, except for the fact they had on them a calculator

  • app.

  • This was actually an encrypted messaging service in disguise.

  • Once the user plugged in a code to the calculator, they could send messages and photos knowing,

  • or at least thinking, that law enforcement would never see them.

  • And boy, as you'll see, they pretty much sent everything through those phones.

  • This operation, calledOperation Trojan Shieldofficially started in 2018, but

  • of course, the police wanted to give the criminals enough time to really put themselves in it.

  • They also needed what they calledcriminal influencersto spread the word that a new

  • network was out, and it was safe.

  • One of them was an Australian drug kingpin named Hakan Ayik.

  • He's now a marked man because he was one of the people that vouched for the phones

  • after he'd been duped into taking some by undercover agents.

  • He's now apparently living the life of luxury somewhere in Turkey, although police have

  • said he isbest off handing himself into ussince a lot of people will likely want

  • him dead.

  • In order to buy one of the phones, you had to know someone in the game and then pay the

  • syndicate that was supplying them.

  • Things just snowballed from there.

  • The more high-profile criminals that used them the more trusted the phones seemed, and

  • by the time 2019 rolled around they were used all over the world by people belonging to

  • Mexican cartels, various European mafias, and powerful Asian crime syndicates.

  • What the users of the phones didn't know is that law enforcement had the master key

  • to the encryption, so for years investigators read messages that discussed some of the most

  • serious crimes on the planet.

  • We are talking about the trafficking of explosives and countless weapons, about the trafficking

  • of tons and tons of narcotics, and also about who was in the firing line to get whacked.

  • At first, only 50 phones were distributed in Australia, but soon they started selling

  • like hotcakes.

  • When the sting happened, almost 12,000 phones were being used by 300 transnational criminal

  • organizations in 90 countries.

  • 27 million messages had been intercepted comprising 45 languages.

  • This is what the Australian Federal Police Commissioner said about what they were reading

  • on a regular basis: “We have been in the back pockets of organized

  • crime.

  • All they talk about is drugs, violence, hits on each other, innocent people who are going

  • to be murdered, a whole range of things.”

  • To give you some examples, at one point someone sent a photograph.

  • In it washundreds of tons of cocaine that were concealed in shipments of fruit.”

  • It seems this shipment wasn't taken by the authorities.

  • Another photo showed hundreds of kilos of cocaine nicely packaged with a Batman label.

  • One of the many messages read, “There is 2kg put inside French diplomatic sealed envelopes

  • out of Bogota.”

  • The message then explained that the Colombians could send 2kg a week every week and they

  • wanted 50 percent of the profits.

  • Another example conversation was between the names Real G and Ironman.

  • The former said, “South side asked what the prices are in Hong Kong per piece.”

  • Piece meant kilogram.

  • These kinds of messages led to drug confiscations, such as the 613 kilos of cocaine that was

  • on its way from Ecuador to Belgium hidden in cans of tuna.

  • When the tuna company was busted, another 1,523 kilos of cocaine was found, also headed

  • to Belgium.

  • In fact, four tons (four thousand kilos) of cocaine was intercepted.

  • After the arrests were made, the confiscations included: 8 tons of cocaine, 22 tons of cannabis

  • and resin, 2 tons of amphetamine and methamphetamine, as well as six tons of chemicals used to make

  • drugs.

  • On top of that, police seized 250 firearms, 55 luxury vehicles, an unreported amount of

  • cryptocurrencies, and almost $200 million in cash.

  • The users of the phones were so sure their privacy was covered that they didn't really

  • try very hard to use any kind of code.

  • Police even discovered how criminals diddry runswhich were basically sending containers

  • without the narcotics in them just to see how fast things happened and if there were

  • problems with customs.

  • Knowing that cops had so many organized crime figures in their hands and they were preventing

  • untold amounts of illegal drugs from getting to their destinations, you might wonder why

  • they decided in 2021 to swoop down and arrest all the names they had.

  • This was the FBI's explanation, “This was an ideal time to take it down.

  • We decided, based on the amount of crime that was occurring, the threats to life, it was

  • time to get these criminals off the street.”

  • The agency said that during the years the operation had been going, police in various

  • countries had managed tomitigatethreats to life, meaning they somehow prevented the

  • murders from happening.

  • At the time of the arrests, 10 people in Sweden were apparently on the kill list.

  • 155 people were arrested in that country, while 60 people in Germany and 49 people in

  • Belgium were also arrested.

  • 200 folks in Australia got that early morning call from the cops, too.

  • Spain and Serbia also saw a lot of arrests, but as you know, the number of people who

  • used the app was huge.

  • Even though this is a massive bust, it won't put a too large dent in the distribution of

  • drugs around the world.

  • The Anon app was said to be used by a small number of organized crime members, especially

  • when you consider how many there actually are.

  • Australian Police said there are many more similar technologies out there they just don't

  • yet know aboutor maybe they don't know about them.

  • Now you need to watch, “Cocaine vs Heroin - Which Drug is More Dangerous (Drug Addiction)?”

  • Or, have a look at, “Incredible Story of British Stock Broker Who Became A Drug Kingpin

  • In United States.”

A high-ranking member of a violent Australian biker gang has his door kicked in by police.

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B1 police cocaine organized crime crime australian fbi

How FBI Tricked Mafia into Using Their App for Messaging

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    Summer posted on 2021/06/25
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