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  • December 1999.

  • Police in Pakistan find a package and a 32-page diary that outlines the brutal murder of 100

  • children aged eight to 16.

  • The writer of the diary explains in gruesome detail how he lured the kids into his trap,

  • strangled them, chopped them into small pieces, and dissolved their body parts in acid.

  • He even provided police photos of the victims prior to their demise.

  • Cops were dealing with the worst serial killer ever in the country of Pakistan, a killer

  • who enraged the public so much they literally wanted to rip him to pieces.

  • Maybe his fate should mirror his crimes, people said, with Hammurabi's code in mind:

  • “A life for a life, an eye for an eye, a nose for a nose, an ear for an ear, a tooth

  • for a tooth, an equal wound for a wound.”

  • Welcome to one of the darkest stories in the annals of human history.

  • The extent of these atrocities would come to light when the killer, 40 year old Javel

  • Iqbal, sent a letter to a newspaper in Lahore that read like this:

  • All the details of the murders are contained in the diary and the 32-page notebook that

  • have been placed in the room and had also been sent to the authorities.

  • This is my confessional statement.”

  • When the cops got to his three-room apartment what awaited them was a scene of utter horror.

  • The walls were covered in blood; children's clothes were strewn across the floor; dozens

  • of pairs of little shoes and sandals were scattered around.

  • In one room, there was a vat of acid, still bubbling, with what looked like the remains

  • of legs bobbing up and down.

  • A cop looked at the floor and picked up a note that was lying there.

  • It read: “The bodies in the house have deliberately

  • not been disposed of so that authorities will find them.”

  • There were the remains of three children in that house.

  • On a blood-spattered wall, there was a large piece of paper.

  • Scrawled on it were the words, “Yesterday, I killed my employee, Sajid, and incinerated

  • his body in the container so that he could be punished for theft and for disturbing me

  • again and again.”

  • What in God's name were they dealing with, the cops thought as they searched through

  • the mess.

  • For some reason, the killer had kept snakes.

  • Police found the boxes they would have been contained in.

  • In another room, they found a bunch of board games that children might enjoy.

  • One of the cops picked up a video cassette from the floor, a popular Italian exploitation

  • film entitled, “The Beast in Heat.”

  • On another wall was another note that read, “The world will remember this mode of revenge.

  • The bodies flowed through the sewer just like my blood.”

  • The lengthy diary described how he'd killed the kids.

  • There were even sometimes details as to where they likely lived, and who their parents were.

  • The diary explained how he got hold of them and the terrible things he did to them.

  • It even detailed how much acid it took to dissolve a body, which according to the killer

  • was exactly 120 rupees, just over a couple of dollars back then.

  • Very soon after, the cops launched one of the biggest manhunts that Pakistan had ever

  • seen.

  • But, who was this man, this monster?

  • He was the sixth child of a fairly well-off businessman named Mohammad Ali Mughal.

  • He went to school and college and had pretty much everything he needed.

  • His pop set him up in the steel recasting business and let him stay at one of his houses.

  • To all appearances, he was a young professional man who was doing just fine in life, but obviously,

  • that wasn't the case at all.

  • As you'll see, behind that normal life were some very dark secrets.

  • He hadn't acted alone in the murders.

  • Prior to his arrest, four teenagers were arrested on charges of helping him.

  • One of them soon died in police custody.

  • The cops said he'd jumped out of a window, but reports stated it was more likely they'd

  • beaten him to death.

  • In fact, the murder was so obvious the administration of the Lahore cops was moved around.

  • Still, the 100s of relatives of the missing kids who'd seen photos of their loved ones

  • weren't exactly upset over the slaying of one of Iqbal's helpers.

  • But where was he?

  • Well, like a scene from the movieSeven”, on December 30 he walked right into the offices

  • of the Urdu daily newspaper.

  • He didn't exactly hold bloody arms up in front of him and say, “You're looking

  • for me”, but he did say this: “I am Javed Iqbal, killer of 100 children.

  • I hate this world, I am not ashamed of my actions and I am ready to die.

  • I have no regrets.”

  • Things got very strange after that.

  • He said that the reason he hadn't gone to the cops and had chosen the newspaper was

  • that he feared the police would kill him and try to make his murder look like something

  • else.

  • As you already know and as you'll see soon, he was certainly not being overly paranoid

  • for harboring that belief.

  • He then changed his story, telling the judge in court that he hadn't actually killed

  • the kids but had seen them being murdered by someone else.

  • He told them that the reason he'd written the letters, the posters, and sent the packages,

  • was because he wanted to bring attention to the fact that parents had neglected those

  • kids and had left them to their own devices in the streets.

  • Sure, there'd been previous confessions, his lawyer said, but some of them had been

  • made during a three-week ordeal at the hands of very, er, persuasive cops.

  • Still, this is the guy that had detailed the killings.

  • It's the guy that had children's clothes and shoes in his house.

  • Could he really not be the killer?

  • 105 witnesses were introduced to the court by the prosecution.

  • Even though the defense had claimed that many of the kids weren't actually dead and had

  • gone back home, the testimony of witnesses didn't seem to suggest that.

  • In fact, every day during the two-month trial parents of victims and angry citizens waited

  • outside the courthouse screaming that this guy had to be put to death.

  • All over the world, people watched news clips of parents weeping as they rummaged through

  • the pile of children's clothes police laid out.

  • It also turned out that Iqbal had been arrested in the past for a crime involving a boy.

  • The prosecutor said, ok, so we don't know where the bodies are, but there's enough

  • evidence to put this man to death.

  • But there was another story, too.

  • If 100 kids had been killed, how could that happen, and no one report something when each

  • disappearance occurred?

  • Some people blamed poverty, and the fact some of those kids were lost and abandoned, often

  • left alone to beg.

  • Others talked about a taboo issue hardly ever broached in Pakistan, the issue of poor kids

  • being prey to vulturous men.

  • The whole macabre case underlines the terrible sexual frustration and perversion that lie

  • just below the surface of our hypocritical society,” said one Pakistani journalist.

  • He said such abuse was rampant, but the crimes were not spoken about.

  • In court before the judge, Iqbal said, “Whatever I wanted to say has been distorted.

  • I have seen the children being killed.

  • I am an eyewitness to that.

  • I was considered an insane person.

  • But I beg that my point of view must also be heard.

  • I considered myself as a culprit because I have been made a culprit by police.”

  • He said the cops in the past had extorted cash from him and his family.

  • He also said that he was beaten by his servants and he'd gone to the cops to complain.

  • Instead of helping him, they also beat him and then set him up on a false charge.

  • He said, after that, he made a pledge of revenge.

  • This is what he said to reporters when he turned up at their office to hand himself

  • in: “I could have killed 500, this was not a

  • problem, money was not a problem.

  • But the pledge I had taken was of 100 children, and I never wanted to violate this.”

  • He later changed this story, saying after the beating by his servants, he and some others

  • went looking for them.

  • He said it was during those searches that he discovered many young boys living on the

  • streets, abandoned by their parents.

  • He told the court that he took photos of them to bring attention to this social problem.

  • Stories came out that painted a picture of Iqbal's secret life.

  • It was said that when he was in his 20s his parents tried very hard to arrange a marriage

  • for him, but he resisted their every attempt and ignored the photos of women they put in

  • front of him.

  • The reason was he wasn't interested in women, but the opposite sex and preferably someone

  • of a young age.

  • He did actually tell his parents he was going to get married, but it turned out he wanted

  • to do that because the woman was the older sister of one of the boys he was attracted

  • to.

  • That fake marriage lasted only three months.

  • It was also revealed how he opened a video game arcade, offering free stuff to boys.

  • People testified that he enjoyed nothing more than to just sit and watch them play.

  • Sometimes he'd surreptitiously put a 100 rupee note on the floor.

  • After a boy had picked it up and kept it, Iqbal would announce that everyone had to

  • be searched in a private room.

  • It was said that some terrible things happened to some of the boys, after which they were

  • always given the 100 rupee note as a “gesture of goodwill.”

  • Some people that knew him understood his ways, saying he was anevil geniusthat was

  • cunning when it came to getting what he wanted.

  • Parents actually stopped their kids from going to that arcade after hearing what the wealthy

  • young man was up to, but then he opened a gym, and also an aquarium, as another way

  • to get close to his prey.

  • The court heard these stories and they'd seen the evidence that was available.

  • He had his sob story and it appeared he had a passionate lawyer that believed his stories.

  • One of the problems was, the Pakistani police were corrupt and sometimes murderous, so accusations

  • leveled against them by Iqbal weren't exactly unbelievable.

  • It was actually discovered during the trial that many of the parents hadn't reported

  • their kids missing because they were afraid to speak to the cops.

  • That might sound strange to some of our viewers, but in many parts of the developing world,

  • people would rather not report something, even a car accident, because the victims can

  • end up paying corrupt cops or face false charges.

  • In fact, it came out that young children went missing all the time in parts of the country

  • and no one breathed a word about it to the authorities.

  • One mother whose kid was a victim said to Time magazine in the US, “It never even

  • occurred to me to go to the police for help.”

  • A Pakistani intellectual and newspaper columnist named Irfan Husain explained why, “The vast

  • majority who are forced to come in contact with our cops, nine times out of ten, they

  • are shaken down even when reporting a crime.”

  • This case, as big as it was, was turning into something bigger, which was a powerful expose

  • of societal wrongs.

  • That same columnist said Iqbal could easily have killed 500 poor kids and he absolutely

  • would have gotten away with it.

  • He had money, and his victims didn't.

  • The cops, he alluded, were more interested in money than justice.

  • When judgment day came the country was on the edge of one giant seat.

  • Mobs crowded the courthouse, small riots broke out in the streets.

  • The judge had the weight of a country on his shoulders.

  • The police scurried around in dark places like rats in the gutters, hoping no more light

  • would shine on their misdeeds.

  • The Judge, Allah Baksh Ranja, shocked everyone.

  • He didn't only hand down the death sentence, but he ordered something that wasn't actually

  • written into the law.

  • He said the death sentence should be carried out in public at Pakistan's National Monument

  • in Lahore.

  • This is exactly what he told Iqbal that day in court:

  • You will be strangled to death in front of the parents whose children you killed.

  • Your body will then be cut into 100 pieces and put in acid, the same way you killed the

  • children.”

  • The 100 pieces were for the 100 victims.

  • It was a case of an eye for an eye, a tooth for a tooth, what's sometimes called the

  • law of retaliation.

  • Even for some hardliners, the punishment was a bit too much for the late 20th century.

  • Iqbal's lawyer thought so, telling the British press: “There is no law which allows a person

  • to be hanged publicly, to cut up pieces of the body.

  • It is against the constitution of Pakistan.”

  • So, did it happen just as the judge had ordered?

  • Well, we would say what we're about to tell you is shocking, but after hearing what you've

  • heard already you probably expect it.

  • One day while Iqbal was in jail, he was found dead in his cell.

  • The same day one of his accomplices was also found dead in his cell.

  • This happened just four days after Pakistan's highest Islamic Court had agreed to listen

  • to Iqbal's appeal against the death sentence.

  • How could this happen in one of the most high-profile criminal cases in the history of Pakistan?

  • Surely someone should have been keeping a close eye on those guys.

  • There weren't any CCTV cameras working that night.

  • As for the guard who should have heard or seen something, he'd fallen asleep on the

  • job, a seemingly not uncommon occurrence when high-profile people die in jail cells.

  • You know how the authorities explained those deaths, and you'd be right in thinking that

  • some of the public didn't buy into it even as much as people detested those men.

  • Not only was Iqbal found with a bloody nose and cuts to his face, but an autopsy revealed

  • he'd been severely beaten over a period of days.

  • It was also revealed that he'd recently written to his lawyer stating that he believed

  • he was going to be murdered in his cell by prison authorities.

  • You could call it rough justice, but the real injustice was the lives of some of the poorest

  • most vulnerable families in Pakistan remained blighted by abuses and corruption.

  • Now you need to watch, “Japanese Horrific Serial Killer - Tsutomu Miyazak (The Human

  • Dracula)” Or, have a look at

December 1999.

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B1 pakistan killer police killed court diary

Serial Killer Who Begged Cops to Stop Him

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    Summer posted on 2021/06/13
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