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  • This video is sponsored by KiwiCo, seriously fun and enriching science and art projects,

  • delivered directly to you!

  • As the father of a three year old, I couldn't have been happier than when I discovered KiwiCo.

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  • Almost a billion people are born every decade, and all of those people want a juicy hamburger

  • just as bad as you.

  • Only problem is, we're running out of farm land.

  • That's where your favorite lab rat comes in, as we challenge him to teach us how humans

  • in the future may live with an all-bug diet.

  • Alright InfoFans, the show is clearly running low on covid-friendly ideas, and maybe they

  • took inspiration from one of my wilderness survival challenges, but now they've got me

  • on an all-insect diet for seven days.

  • At least I got to pick my insects to eat, which let me tell you- doesn't really help

  • much.

  • Here's the thing, I have no idea what kind of insect foods there even are, so I had to

  • do some research online for a sort of daily meal guide.

  • The show turned me on to edibleinsects.com, which is more than happy to provide all your

  • delicious insect needs, and I made Infographics pay dearly for this challenge with some primo

  • grade crickets, meal worms, and even scorpions plus a few other surprises.

  • I bet some of you are practically retching already at the idea of an insect diet, but

  • truth is, it's kind of all protein to me.

  • Now the girlfriend on the other hand... well.

  • Let's just say she about flew back home to stay with her parents for the duration.

  • I had to very carefully explain that the insects were already dead- I think all of you know

  • just how well she does with creepie crawlies.

  • So how'd my bug diet go?

  • For breakfast every day I decided that even for me my first meal of the day would have

  • to be a little easy to get down.

  • There's a sort of 'sticker shock' when you open up a delivery box full of recently dead

  • insects that still look, well, like insects.

  • So I bought some cricket protein powder which is exactly what it sounds like- the ground

  • up dust of thousands of crickets: their cricket wives, cricket children, cricket parents,

  • and cricket grandparents.

  • Honestly, cricket protein tastes just as terrible as any regular protein powder on the market.

  • To make it edible I mixed it with with various fruits into a nice smoothie each morning,

  • and threw in some flax seeds because... honestly, I don't know.

  • The girlfriend puts flax seeds in every breakfast item ever and swears by them, but I'll be

  • damned if I know what flax seeds honestly do for you.

  • Chicks love flax seeds though, so into the smoothie they go.

  • At that point my daily breakfasts tasted, well, like a smoothie.

  • Honestly you could start using cricket protein powder right now and not taste a difference

  • between that and any other protein powder.

  • Smoothies famously leave me feeling rather hungry though, so I was very concerned about

  • lunch, because I couldn't seriously consider that insects would be enough to leave me satisfied

  • like a nice, juicy burger.

  • I was wrong.

  • Alright, lunch time was my first real challenge in downing my all insect diet, because now

  • the food actually looked like, you know, insects.

  • I'm a fan of lettuce wraps of all kind, so I got myself a nice head of butter lettuce

  • and a box of dead crickets for my first lunch.

  • You can actually buy yourself a pound of crickets for about $40, which sounds like an outrageous

  • price until you consider the absolute bonkers amount of calories and protein packed into

  • each tiny dead cricket body.

  • 100 grams of crickets contains almost three times the protein of an equal amount of moo

  • cow beef.

  • It also has less saturated fat- though not by a lot to be honest, and way more carbohydrates.

  • Just two tablespoons of these bad boys contain a whopping 90 calories, so everyone touting

  • the insect diet hopefully eats in moderation because these bad boys will get you fat pretty

  • quick.

  • So I roasted my crickets in some butter, salt, and pepper, then squeezed lime juice on them

  • and ladled them onto lettuce cups.

  • By this point the girlfriend looked absolutely green in the face, and she dry heaved the

  • first time she saw the crickets sizzling on the pan.

  • Because, of course, nobody goes in and plucks off their tiny little heads or legs and stuff

  • before packaging- you get the whole cricket and these things look like they were killed

  • just yesterday.

  • Like I said, serious sticker shock content.

  • I took a bite of my first lettuce cup and the girlfriend actually rushed out of the

  • room dry heaving when several dead crickets spilled out of my lettuce cup as I sunk my

  • teeth in.

  • You know what?

  • Crickets taste... earthy?

  • I don't know.

  • I've eaten one or two in the wild before during some of my survival challenges or when doing

  • wilderness survival training, but I never really had enough to get a real 'taste' of

  • them in my mouth.

  • There is a lot of crunching though, which was oddly satisfying but also served to remind

  • me that I was eating a mouth full of bugs.

  • What was really annoying was the way their tiny little legs get stuck in between your

  • teeth, and their antennas kind of get left behind when you swallow.

  • You ever have a hair in your mouth?

  • It's a lot like that, and you end up spitting out bug antennas for a half hour after you're

  • done eating.

  • Immediately after my first lunch I went to try and get a kiss from the girlfriend, but

  • she was having absolutely none of that.

  • I chased her around the house and tried to pin her down but she slipped away and locked

  • herself in the bedroom.

  • She made it very clear there'd be no kissing this entire week.

  • Other lunches throughout the week included even more crickets, which honestly are kind

  • of limited in the ways you can prepare them.

  • Seems like roasting them is pretty much it, the key is in pairing them with something

  • complimentary.

  • Not pasta.

  • Believe me, insects do not go well with pasta- but I'd find out about that soon enough.

  • Other lunches included black ants, which you can also buy by the boat full.

  • I sizzled them up with some peas and carrots, honestly ants kind of just took the place

  • of rice in my meals.

  • The real piece de la resistance however came on Friday, my last lunch of the challenge

  • in which I treated myself to... tarantula.

  • Now, ants and crickets are pretty economically priced, but tarantula is basically the filet

  • mignon of the insect world.

  • I ended up billing the show $20 for two tarantulas, which had to be flown in from Thailand directly

  • and cost a whopping $30 in shipping charges.

  • Also, they took two weeks to get here so I ordered them well in advance of this challenge.

  • Ok, my tarantula lunch ended up being an expensive disaster.

  • Let me explain.

  • First, I don't know if you knew this, but I am not a bug cuisine master chef.

  • I have done some very rudimentary research and just kind of winged it with my preparation

  • of most of my meals.

  • So, for instance, I had no idea you were supposed to remove the abdomen from the tarantula,

  • and believe me, you want to remove the abdomen from the tarantula.

  • I cannot explain the horrors I experienced biting into a big, fat, tarantula abdomen.

  • Hey, I figured that's where all the meat was.

  • I was wrong, that was where all the terror was.

  • Think overstuffed jelly donut, exploding outwards on your face, only not delicious jelly at

  • all.

  • Just... disgusting bug guts jelly.

  • Also, I didn't know you were supposed to singe off the tarantula hairs.

  • Some tarantulas use those fine hairs as defensive weapons, so imagine how wonderful it felt

  • to have a bunch of them get stuck in my throat.

  • Alright, mistakes were made, but I battered and fried my tarantulas up following a recipe

  • I found online.

  • This was pared with some nice plum sauce, then lightly salted.

  • You know how I've been talking about sticker shock throughout this episode?

  • Well, nothing compares to the sticker shock of a full-grown tarantula sitting on your

  • plate.

  • Unless it's two full-grown tarantulas sitting on your plate ready for you to chomp down.

  • When the girlfriend saw it she actually got light headed and I thought she was going to

  • faint.

  • She promptly walked out of the kitchen, she couldn't even bear to watch me eat these eight

  • legged freaks.

  • So how'd they taste?

  • Well, I feel like I have the palette of a potato farmer sometimes, because honestly,

  • it was kind of bland to me.

  • Like unseasoned chicken.

  • Unlike most of the other bugs I had this week though, the meat was actually kind of chewy,

  • especially the legs.

  • I'll admit though, I couldn't do it- eating dead spiders the size of my palm was just

  • too much.

  • Alright, for day snacks throughout my week I actually got a bunch of insect bars, which

  • is basically what it sounds like.

  • They're sort of like granola bars but way edgier, with crickets and meal worms and other

  • unidentifiable creepy crawleys mixed in there.

  • They're mashed up enough that you really can't tell what you're eating, and the addition

  • of vanilla or nuts, or chocolate basically masks any insect taste.

  • Again, another good way to ease yourself into a bug diet.

  • Another surprisingly tasty snack was chocolate covered scorpions, though sadly they did not

  • have their stingers and were kind of tiny.

  • I was hoping for a scorpion as big as my hand, but though I heard you can get them they're

  • also pretty expensive.

  • Dinner is my favorite meal of the day, but my first dinner would end in disaster.

  • Now, maybe I still have some of my youthful child-like wonder in me, but when I thought

  • about insect diet, I immediately thought about worm spaghetti.

  • I mean honestly, what could go better together?

  • Well, sadly, you can't really get long worms unless you just buy a case of nightcrawlers

  • from a bait shop, but even that seemed like too much for me.

  • So I settled for smaller meal worms, and basically fried them up with olive oil, some rosemary

  • and thyme, and dumped them into a pot of spaghetti.

  • This was a mistake.

  • The slippery consistency of the spaghetti did not compliment the crunchiness of the

  • meal worms in the expected way.

  • It just sort of made me think of big fat nightcrawlers in my mouth- or maybe I just had that image

  • already because I was originally thinking about them.

  • Either way, this was the only meal the whole week where I legitimately heaved and almost

  • barfed.

  • The whole thing went into the trash, absolutely no thank you.

  • I did find a recipe online for a Bee-LT, which immediately sold me because puns are life.

  • Turns out, you don't actually get adult bees, which I guess makes sense, and instead you

  • get bee larvae when you order a bag of edible bees.

  • Now, preparing this was kind of tricky.

  • First I sauteed the larvae in butter with a few drops of honey, then mixed them with

  • egg white, and put the whole thing back in the pan to solidify it.

  • Now I had a sort of bee-steak held together by egg white, so I flopped that on top of

  • some lettuce and tomato and boom, my very first bee-LT ever.

  • The girlfriend was far less delighted at my creation than I was, honestly at this point

  • in the week she was basically queasy and green every single day.

  • How'd it taste?

  • Listen, I knew going in that once this challenge was over I wasn't going to be turning to an

  • insect diet.

  • Literally none of these meals were going to make it into my real life meal plans.

  • Bee larvae may have changed my mind.

  • These chubby little things basically live their whole lives in honey- it's all they

  • eat.

  • So not only are they plump, but when you bite into them they have a very nice sweet taste.

  • It's like candy but not as sugary or overly sweet- honestly, it's just right.

  • I loved this so much that I actually roasted more of these bad boys up, in honey of course,

  • then dusted them with some sea salt and stuck them in a bag for a fantastic snack.

  • Out of all the bugs I've eaten, these things are definitely staying.

  • Well, that is if I can get the girlfriend to come around to it.

  • She has really suffered through this whole week, to the point that she was non-jokingly

  • thinking about staying with a friend after the third day.

  • She's been nauseated at basically every meal, and we quickly had to start eating apart which

  • I really didn't like because sitting down to a meal together is one of my favorite things.

  • I told her about the bee larvae, and she was not having it.

  • I think she just needs time away from seeing me cooking up all kinds of bugs and worms

  • every day of the week, maybe in a month or two she'll come around.

  • But you should be buying bee larvae like yesterday, because trust me it's pretty much aces.

  • Now go check out Eat Only What I Catch For 72 Hours!

  • Or click this other video instead!

This video is sponsored by KiwiCo, seriously fun and enriching science and art projects,

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B1 tarantula insect cricket meal bee diet

Eat Only Insects For A Week (Including Tarantula) - FUNNY CHALLENGE & EXPERIMENT

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    Summer posted on 2021/05/30
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