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  • The year is 2077 and Captain Archie Atlas is about to boldly go where no man has ever

  • been before.

  • His grandkids are at home watching the event via their Neurolink device, wondering what

  • the hell is going to happen to their beloved spaceman as he approaches a black hole.

  • Thing is, nobody knows what will happen, but we do have an idea of what could happen.

  • The gravity from the black hole will be so strong that Atlas's feet are pulled away,

  • elongating his body so much he looks like a piece of spaghetti.

  • There's even a term for that: spaghettification.

  • Atlas might also just be torn apart or even evaporate.

  • Either way, he'll sure justify earning that super-massive wage NASA pays him every month.

  • But that's not what happens, not completely anyway.

  • Only one part of Atlas gets the spaghetti treatment, but he actually splits into two

  • realities.

  • One of them enters the hole and the other stays outside it.

  • The crew on Atlas' spaceship, which is a safe distance from the black hole, hear his

  • last words, but they are slow and broken.

  • They hear their captain say, “My God, it's full of…”

  • What they can see is his spaghetti-half seemingly stuck in the same place at the mouth of the

  • hole, albeit he looks like he's been stretched across the surface.

  • But the other him is in freefall having passed the event horizon.

  • He is just fine having the happiest thoughts as he heads towards the singularity.

  • he's not sure what's there, maybe oblivion, maybe someone's bookcase on Earth.

  • It's highly likely he's never getting out.

  • He's passed the point of no return.

  • Inside the spacecraft, aptly named Hades 6, the crew are all in tears seeing the other

  • Atlas looking like a human noodle.

  • Down on Earth a tsunami of RIPs are being sent down the Neurolinks.

  • So, what happens now to Captain Atlas?

  • The obvious answer is he suddenly finds himself on Earth at the dawn of intelligent life in

  • monkey form, throwing bones at a monolith in the desert.

  • Something happens, and then he's inside the body of a character on the TV show F.R.I.E.N.D.S.

  • In fact, he's going to experience all reality on Earth since time began.

  • Maybe you think that sounds like a load of baloney, or maybe you think during lockdown

  • Infographics writers have been hitting the glue, but the truth is, no one knows what

  • would happen.

  • Scientists have lots of theories, perhaps a little bit different to our scenario, but

  • not all that different.

  • One of the greatest mysteries of the universe is what is down a black hole.

  • That's the thing about the universe.

  • It's complicated.

  • So, that's one thing we don't know about the universe, the conundrum of what would

  • happen if someone tried to go into a black hole.

  • If you think that's a bit of a mind-bender, we have a lot more information to mess with

  • your head.

  • Ok, so we used that wordinfinite” a couple of times already.

  • The question is, do we know for sure the universe is infinite?

  • If it is, does that mean there are infinite copies of you doing exactly what you are doing

  • now, or maybe copies of you doing something a little bit different than you are doing

  • now?

  • Does it mean somewhere there's a bunch of monkeys randomly hitting keys on a typewriter

  • and at some point one perfectly writes the complete works of Shakespeare?

  • The answer is, it's possible.

  • There's the theory that around 13.8 billion years ago there was a Big Bang and the universe

  • started expanding, something calledcosmological inflation”.

  • Eventually, with a bit of hard work and patience, galaxies formed and at some point so did the

  • one that our dear Earth sits in.

  • About 3.7 billion years ago microscopic lifeforms graced the Earth and fast-forward a bit and

  • here we are talking to you.

  • If everything started with a Big Bang, what came before the bang?

  • What exactly is nothing, because surely there always has to be something?

  • Scientists aren't exactly sure.

  • British physicist Stephen Hawking said there was nothing before the Big Bang, but it was

  • a weird kind of nothing.

  • He's dead now, so maybe he's walking around in heaven kicking himself for all the false

  • information he provided us during his time on terra firma.

  • Don't laugh, a good portion of the world thinks God created everything and we guess

  • they think before God got to work on the universe there was just him, bored and lonely with

  • a lot of time on his hands.

  • Anyway, according to Hawking, the universe doesn't have a boundary.

  • He says it was once a subatomic ball called the singularity.

  • In that tiniest of particles, the laws of physics didn't exist.

  • It was always reaching closer to nothing but didn't become,” Hawking said about that

  • ball.

  • He gave an example, saying there's nothing more south than the South Pole.

  • He said, “There was never a Big Bang that produced something from nothing.

  • It just seemed that way from mankind's perspective.”

  • We told you this show would be a mind-bender.

  • What he means is humans are unable to understand anything outside of space and time.

  • What we call nothing before the Big Bang was actually something, but something we can't

  • comprehend.

  • Not all scientists agree with Hawking's theory of cosmological origin.

  • That's because no one has incontrovertible truth as to its origin, except maybe the evangelist

  • Billy Graham, who died just a few weeks after Hawking.

  • He once said, “God had no beginning!

  • He has always existedand He always will

  • God is greater than the universe.”

  • Even if you think God did indeed create the Universe, no Christian scholar has ever been

  • able to explain what came before God just as no scientist can tell you exactly what

  • nothing is.

  • It's like this, to some scientists at least, we can't perceive anything outside of our

  • own laws of physics, so we just can't explain what nothing is.

  • Nonetheless, physicists eternally disagree about nothing.

  • A few years ago a bunch of them got together at the American Museum of Natural History

  • to talk aboutThe Existence of Nothingand not surprisingly everyone had a different

  • theory.

  • Moderator Neil deGrasse Tyson summed the showdown up with the words, “Maybe nothing will never

  • be resolved.”

  • Here at the Infographics Show we like what the perpetually happy British physicist Brian

  • Cox said after being asked what came before the Big Bang.

  • His answer was: “We don't know.”

  • Embracing academic humility, he said that the universe might well be eternal.

  • Maybe things just exist, he said, but he can't be sure.

  • No one can be sure.

  • Maybe the answer lies inside a black hole.

  • There are some scientists that talk about a “Mirror Universe”, which is a theory

  • along the lines that there's a parallel universe next to the one we live in but in

  • that universe, time runs backward.

  • Instead of particles, it has antiparticles.

  • One scientist explained it like this.

  • Imagine an egg yolk.

  • Then imagine the process of it turning back into an uncracked egg and subsequently the

  • egg being inside the chicken.

  • Then imagine the process over again going forwards.

  • The universe could be this cycle continued.

  • What passes away comes into being.

  • Then there's themultiversetheory in which every possible outcome can happen.

  • One scientist penned the term, “eternal chaotic inflation”, which sounds applicable

  • to the bad news we heard in 2020.

  • What that scientist was talking about are universes outside our universe constantly

  • forming and growing.

  • As for what's going on in those universes, well, we just don't know.

  • Maybe right now in a galaxy far far away there are easily upset creatures, droids, and humans,

  • getting wasted in a cantina while listening to jazz music.

  • Anything's possible in a multiverse- except one thing: Han shot first, and Lucas can re-edit

  • the original trilogy all he wants but we know the truth.

  • Which brings us to another matter, something else science can't tell you about the universe.

  • Is there life on other planets?

  • It would seem egocentric for humans to say in this vast, maybe infinite universe, there

  • is no life except here on our tiny blue planet.

  • As for what that life would look like, well, how can we possibly imagine something that

  • does not exist in our world?

  • We might create aliens for fun in stories, but we do so based on what we know already.

  • Another lifeform could be something we just cannot imagine.

  • Human knowledge is a toolkit, and it only works in our world.

  • It is probably useless elsewhere.

  • Ok, so how big is this universe of ours.

  • You need to ask this when you're considering life on other planets.

  • Depending on what source you're reading the numbers change.

  • They change for good reason because a lot of guesswork is going on.

  • But, it's thought just in our own galaxy, The Milky Way, there are 100 to 400 billion

  • stars.

  • That's a lot, and again, science can't be sure.

  • We also don't know how many stars have planets, but most do, so we're talking about billions

  • of planets, too.

  • We also believe that many of those planets could host life, we just can't get there

  • yet and break some bread with the aliens.

  • To further put things into perspective, listen to this.

  • If you were traveling at the speed of light you'd be doing a steady 670,616,629 miles

  • per hour.

  • That's a berserk speed, but let's pretend it's possible.

  • Maybe now you're thinking, ok man, at that speed, I could do a round-the-universe trip

  • in no time at all.

  • You'd be wrong, so don't put that on your bucket list just yet.

  • A study in 2018 said that traveling at the speed of light it would take 200,000 years

  • just to cross the Milky Way.

  • That's hardly an adventure, it's only flying across your own hood.

  • In Earth terms, it would be like popping out to buy some toilet paper.

  • If you were traveling at 60 miles per hour it would take you about two trillion years.

  • The Milky Way, that thing that contains billions upon billions of stars and planets is just

  • one galaxy.

  • How many galaxies are there?

  • Science doesn't know of course so it has to guess.

  • One estimate is two trillion galaxies.

  • Add up those numbers and come back to us and say you don't believe in life outside of

  • this cute blue abode of ours.

  • Now think about that bucket list of yours.

  • 200,000 years to get out of town if you could travel at light speed and you've got two

  • trillion places to go.

  • Well, maybe you've got forever to go.

  • We doubt there's a sign after the two trillionth galaxy that reads, "Dead End".

  • Planets outside our solar system are called exoplanets, and scientists believe there are

  • many planets with conditions similar to those on Earth.

  • That could mean right now, somewhere in the universe, things that look like dinosaurs

  • are wandering around on a planet.

  • It could mean somewhere in space there's a planet suffering from a global pandemic

  • or on another planet there are millions of narcissists obsessed with an app called Tok-Tik..different

  • to Tik-Tok only in name.

  • There could be a place where someone like you is looking at his phone watching a show

  • about things we don't know about the universe.

  • Everything and anything is possible...we think.

  • Ok, so there is this thing called matter.

  • You are matter.

  • Your phone is matter.

  • The air you breathe is matter and even the thoughts in your head are matter.

  • Cool, everything is matter, but is there non-matter?

  • Well, there is this thing in the universe called dark matter and it's not matter as

  • we know it.

  • There is a lot of it, too, perhaps making up about 25 percent of the universe.

  • The problem is, we think it's there, but we can't actually see it.

  • It doesn't emit light and it doesn't emit energy, so we can't observe it.

  • We just think it's there because of the way it interacts with other things in the

  • universe.

  • Scientists say that this stuff has a gravitational force that affects the matter we can see,

  • such as other planets.

  • But that's about it, we don't really know what it is.

  • It's like a cosmological ghost.

  • Then you've got dark energy, which makes up about 60 to 70 percent of the universe.

  • We don't know exactly what that is, either.

  • We think that dark matter pulls things towards it and dark energy pushes things away.

  • Look at it this way, if the universe is expanding then something is pushing against our space-time.

  • So you've got normal matter, all the stuff you can see, which makes up about five to

  • ten percent of the universe.

  • Then you have these two mysterious matters that fill up the rest of the space.

  • One is slowing down expansion and one is speeding it up, a kind of yin and yang relationship,

  • a bit like everything in life really.

  • Everything has its opposite, but the pushing matter has more force than the pulling matter,

  • which is a good analogy for human behavior.

  • We need more push than pull otherwise we wouldn't create anything, but we require resistance,

  • so we don't get out of hand.

  • You know something else, we don't even know how we got here.

  • Yep, that's true.

  • We have expressed all these grand ideas of a primordial soup that somehow created the

  • chemicals that became the building blocks for life, but it's total guesswork as to

  • how those things became beings that could type 120 words per minute on their smartphone.

  • We don't really know how DNA formed.

  • We are a mystery to ourselves, and let's not get started about consciousness.

  • There's actually a theory that the universe has consciousness, it's calledpanpsychism”,

  • and it's quite popular with some far out folks in the philosophy community and people

  • that have smoked DMT.

  • Is it true?

  • It could be.

  • Do we even know how long we've got?

  • Does Earth have a life expectancy?

  • It's thought in millions of years from now most of life on Earth could end due to some

  • massive disaster such as an asteroid strike.

  • There will be something left, though, so we might need to be whacked by what's called

  • a rogue planet to really see the end of life on Earth.

  • It's a possibility.

  • It's also possible that Earth itself could one day go rogue.

  • It's all guesswork of course.

  • Maybe one day God will get bored of our habitual whining and kick us like a soccer ball into

  • the next galaxy.

  • After life has been destroyed, there will still be a floating rock in space that humans

  • once called Earth.

  • By the way, that word likely comes from the Old English word, “eorþe”, which means

  • ground or soil.

  • The Earth could be hit by a rogue planet and if that doesn't finish the place off, the

  • sun will start expanding in about a billion years.

  • In five billion years that thing will turn into a red giant, though modern theories actually