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  • We've all been there - it's after midnight on the night before a big exam, and you're

  • over caffeinated, underslept, and downright panicked as you pour over your notes one last

  • time, hoping against hope that it will all miraculously click at the very last minute.

  • You know you should have started studying way earlier, but you can never seem to find

  • the motivation to get started.

  • If only you knew how to study when you don't want to...

  • Most people struggle to find the motivation to focus on studying at some point - even

  • the best students have days when they just don't want to study.

  • But waiting until the pressure of a looming deadline forces you to get started is a recipe

  • for disaster.

  • You'll never absorb and retain the material properly by cramming, and pulling an all-nighter

  • will leave you exhausted and unable to recall anything you studied, and will negatively

  • impact your exam performance.

  • Studying a little bit every day is the key to really understanding the material and being

  • able to apply it in an exam setting.

  • Good study habits are also good for your brain, helping it learn to form connections and remember

  • information, and helping you build good habits of discipline and focus, which can only serve

  • you well throughout your education and even later in life.

  • The key is to find a way to make studying not only tolerable, but actually enjoyable,

  • so that it will become a part of your regular daily routine.

  • Believe it or not, it is possible to enjoy studying, and these tips will teach you how

  • to study even when you don't want to, putting you well on your way to acing that next exam!

  • To really get yourself motivated to study, it's helpful to get in touch with yourwhy”.

  • Even if you can't stand a particular topic or class, thinking about how it plays into

  • your bigger-picture goals can help you find the energy to get down to studying.

  • Whether you need to pass a particular course to graduate, get your dream job, or just learn

  • a new skill, thinking about how studying for this test will help you achieve your long-term

  • goals can help you refocus on your priorities.

  • Of course, getting motivated isn't always as simple as remembering why you need to do

  • something.

  • If focusing on your long term goals doesn't have you rushing off to the library, try finding

  • some other sources of motivation to get you in the mood for studying.

  • YouTube is full of inspirational and motivational videos like this one, and you can find plenty

  • of podcasts or articles online that will help get you in the mood for studying.

  • If you still don't want to study after trying to amp yourself up, then try this counterintuitive

  • tip - forget about the actual studying for the moment, and focus instead on getting yourself

  • prepared to study.

  • Spend a little time setting up your study area to encourage maximum focus - tidy up

  • your desk and remove any potential distractions.

  • Make a study plan - outline what you need to get done in the weeks and months ahead,

  • and write down the 3 to 5 most important things you need to tackle next.

  • Organize and file your notes to make it easy to find what you need when you actually get

  • down to studying.

  • Make sure you're well stocked with healthy snacks, water, coffee or tea and some treats

  • to use as rewards.

  • Chances are, after you've got your space all set up, you'll want to take it for a

  • test run and get right down to studying.

  • But if not, never fear - there's another trick you can try to get yourself to study

  • if you still don't want to.

  • Getting started in the first place is often the hardest part about studying.

  • To stop yourself from procrastinating, try starting small with the 5 minute rule.

  • Set a timer for 5 minutes and tell yourself that you only have to work until it goes off.

  • When your timer goes off, you'll have gotten over the hump of getting started and you'll

  • more than likely want to keep going - simply set another timer - maybe for a bit longer

  • this time - and keep working until it goes off.

  • You can also try the Pomodoro Method, where you work for 25 minutes at a time with 5 minute

  • breaks between each session, and a longer break after 4 work sessions.

  • Check out Tomatotimer.com for a fun and motivating Pomodoro timer.

  • There are other ways to start small and break studying into manageable, bite-sized pieces.

  • If you can focus on getting just one task done instead of stressing about all that you

  • have to learn before exam time, you'll be more likely to sit down and get started.

  • Try reviewing your notes, going over them to make sure they make sense, adding some

  • clarification or examples, and highlighting key points.

  • If you have a bit more energy, take some time to condense all of your notes into a short,

  • well-organized study guide.

  • If you have access to a practice exam, take a few minutes to go over it and get an idea

  • of what you're up against.

  • You could also send your teacher or tutor an email with any questions that you have

  • about the material.

  • If you're working on a paper or other project, simply sitting down to set up your document,

  • save a few links for future research, or jot down some ideas for your outline can give

  • you the momentum boost you need to get going.

  • Once you've finally convinced yourself to sit down and start, it's important to make

  • it as easy as possible to keep going, and that means avoiding distractions - or at least

  • using them to your advantage.

  • Listening to music is a tried and true study tip, but choosing the right music is key - you

  • don't want to get sidetracked singing along to your favorite tunes, or get irritated when

  • a song you don't like comes on.

  • Instead, try an instrumental playlist - classical music is, well, classic, but it's far from

  • the only option - YouTube and other streaming services are full of ambient noise study and

  • focus playlists, or you could try listening to the score from one of your favorite movies

  • to make your study session feel as epic as a major motion picture.

  • YouTube is a notorious distraction, but when your focus is flagging, you can use it to

  • your advantage to find videos about the topic you're studying to give yourself a break

  • from the books.

  • Of course, you'll have to be careful not to fall into the rabbit hole - if that's

  • an issue for you, consider installing an app that will block your internet access for a

  • set amount of time, or put your phone away in another room.

  • Another way to keep yourself engaged in studying is to get moving.

  • Exercise is not only good for your body, but thinking on the move can help you consider

  • the information you've absorbed in a new way.

  • You can read books or notes while you walk on a treadmill, or listen to audio lectures

  • or homemade recordings of your notes as you take a walk outside.

  • Going somewhere new to study can also help break up the monotony and give you an energy

  • boost - besides the library, consider studying at a local cafe, or simply find a quiet place

  • outside.

  • Some people learn best by association, so you might benefit from assigning a specific

  • space or room to each topic you have to study - math in your bedroom, English outside, and

  • so on - to help you better remember your material.

  • This one may seem counterintuitive, but one of the best ways to keep studying interesting

  • is to keep challenging yourself.

  • Especially when you find the material boring, making it just a bit trickier can help you

  • keep at it.

  • You don't want to make it so hard that you get frustrated and give up, but giving yourself

  • little challenges, like timing yourself to complete a problem or trying to beat your

  • record for memorizing facts, can keep even the dullest topics fresh and interesting.

  • One of the best ways to get yourself to study when you don't want to is to make it fun,

  • and gamification is the best way to do that.

  • We learn better and are more motivated when something is fun - just think about all the

  • time you've spent trying to reach the next level of your favorite game on your phone

  • when you should have been studying instead!

  • We can apply these principles to studying, too, and not only make studying more tolerable,

  • but more effective, too.

  • Flash cards are a classic study tool for a reason - not only does making them help you

  • organize and remember your material, but they are an easy and portable way to drill yourself

  • on the fly and keep yourself sharp.

  • But if you're looking for something a little more interesting, try these tips.

  • You can find an abundance of mnemonics to help you remember important points for any

  • subject - for example, the phrase Happy Henry Likes Beer But Could Not Obtain Four Nuts

  • can help you remember the first 10 elements on the periodic table of elements - Hydrogen,

  • Helium, Lithium, Beryllium, Boron, Carbon, Nitrogen, Oxygen, Fluorine, Neon.

  • If you can't find a ready-made memory aid, you can make up your own!

  • The act of creating your own memory aid will help cement the learning, and the catchy phrase,

  • song or rhyme you come up with will help you remember some of the most important points

  • from your studying.

  • If you're more of a visual person, drawing a doodle or even creating a comic strip can

  • help make sure that what you're learning sticks with you.

  • If you want to take things to the next level of gamification, you can build your own puzzles

  • and games to help your learning sink in.

  • Board games are great for history and English, sports can help you learn to apply statistics,

  • and a treasure hunt can help bring science topics to life.

  • If you're tech savvy, you could even build an app or online game for your material.

  • The process of actually creating your game counts as studying, since you are engaging

  • with the material and applying it to the real world, and you'll be much more likely to

  • look forward to studying if it involves playing a game.

  • When your motivation is really failing you, and you're finding it hard to focus no matter

  • how fun you've made your studying, it might be time to make studying social.

  • Studying with friends can be a recipe for distraction, especially if you're relying

  • on that time to get all of your studying done, but as long as you've put in some time on

  • your own, getting together with some friends who are all focused on the same goal can help

  • reinvigorate you.

  • Talking about the material with others can help cement your learning and get you to think

  • through the material in new ways.

  • You can also make your social studying extra fun by sharing some of the games and memory

  • tools you've created, or by role-playing as a group.

  • You can also play some group games together, like study-themed truth or dare, where you

  • have to complete a study dare, like writing a paragraph or answering a problem, if you

  • don't know the answer to the truth question.

  • Studying with friends can be a nice way to make studying more fun, just make sure you

  • stay on topic!

  • Finally, it's important to reward yourself for a job well done.

  • If you've achieved your study goals, make sure to pat yourself on the back - positive

  • reinforcement will make your brain want to repeat the activity to get that good feeling

  • again.

  • If you're the type of person who loves buying fresh school supplies, consider treating yourself

  • to a nice new notebook or some fancy pens to encourage yourself to keep studying - plus,

  • neat and attractive notes can actually help you better absorb the information.

  • If you need more immediate gratification, check out writtenkitten.com - this ingenious

  • website will show you a different picture of an adorable kitten for every 100 words

  • that you type.

  • Whatever form your studying takes, it's important to take breaks to refresh and reward

  • yourself.

  • Don't just zone out to the TV or get lost on social media, though.

  • Take the time to check in with some friends, or go for a walk or play a sport instead - exercise

  • helps improve concentration and boosts your mood.

  • Some of these tips for how to study when you don't want to may seem a little wild or

  • weird, but, according to the Oxford Royale Academy, the golden rule of studying is - nothing

  • is silly if it helps!

  • Whether you're playing your own history board game, wandering around singing about

  • chemistry or role-playing a character from your English novel, if it helps you get an

  • A - and gets you to study when you don't want to - then we say go ahead and embrace

  • the weird!

  • Happy studying!

  • If you need just a little bit more motivation before you get down to your studying, you'll

  • want to check out our other helpful videos, like this one calledScientifically Proven

  • Best Ways to Study”, or maybe this other video is for you.

We've all been there - it's after midnight on the night before a big exam, and you're

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Effective Ways to STUDY When YOU DON'T WANT TO

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    Summer posted on 2021/04/26
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