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  • The temperature is over 112 degrees.

  • The desert sands crawl with venomous scorpions Yet with one, single shovelful of dirt, Egyptian

  • archaeologists make the discovery of a lifetime.

  • 3400 years ago, in a move that nearly divided one of the oldest civilizations on earth in

  • two, pharaoh Akhenaten abandoned the traditional Egyptian capital of Thebes.

  • Forcing his entire household and thousands of his subjects to relocate, Akhenaten ordered

  • the construction of a new capital dedicated to a brand new religion: the worship of Aten,

  • god of the Sun.

  • The move proves controversial, and abandon's Egypt's thousands-year old polytheism, along

  • with its capital and all its temples dedicated to the myriad of gods worshipped by the Egyptians.

  • Yet as pharaoh, Akhenaten was himself a living god, making his word a divine command.

  • But Akhenaten's new religion would not survive for long after his death.

  • In the second year of his reign, Akhenaten's son, Tutankhaten, changed his name to Tutankhamun,

  • and with the name change ordered yet a second exodus from his father's new capital back

  • to the traditional seat of Egyptian power in Thebes.

  • Successive generations of pharaohs would work to all but eradicate Akhenaten and his heresy

  • from history, tearing down his temples and destroying all mention of Atenism.

  • Part of that legacy would include what archaeologists dubbed thelost golden city of Luxor”,

  • buried beneath the sands for over three thousand years, until today.

  • It's being called the second most important arcahelogical discovery since the tomb of

  • Tutankhamun- a massive settlement located on the west bank of the Luxor and forgotten

  • by time for milliena.

  • Originally on the hunt for King Tutankhamen's mortuary temple, archaeologists sifting through

  • the Egyptian sands were shocked to discover neat rows of brick laid out in all directions.

  • As the digging continued, what was originally believed to be a small complex turned out

  • to be an entire city.

  • Rumors of a lost city had pervaded Egyptology for over a century, and yet no explorer had

  • ever turned up the location of what is now being called Aten.

  • Buried beneath several feet of sand, the site would have been impossible to locate without

  • a great deal of digging, and there's no telling just how many explorers wandered by atop the

  • lost city, completely unaware of what lurked just beneath their feet.

  • While details are still sparse on who lived here and why, what is known is that the city

  • was active when Egypt was at its wealthiest, and that whoever lived here must have included

  • a large number of skilled workers and government administrators.

  • Though hieroglyphic inscriptions found on wine vessels, as well as the discovery of

  • King Amehotep III's cartouche imprinted onto rings, scarabs, pottery and mud bricks, arcahelogists

  • have been able to date the city at over 3,000 years old- right to the Amarna heresy and

  • Egypt's theological struggles.

  • The dig is far from complete, but already archaelogists have unearthed enough of the

  • city to give them crucial details of daily life for the people who lived there.

  • A large bakery and kitchen have been unearthed, complete with ovens for baking bread and pottery

  • for storage of food items.

  • A workshop nearby still held casting molds and tools, showing that the site was used

  • for the mass production of amulets and ornaments- hinting that the city had a significant part

  • to play in the construction and decoration of tombs and temples.

  • Perhaps even, this city directly supported pharaoh Akhematen's heresy, producing religious

  • articles dedicated to Atenism.

  • A residential district with homes lining both sides of a large street was also discovered.

  • Many of these homes had walls as high as ten feet, and amongst the homes was an administrative

  • center no doubt crucial to the government's operations in the area.

  • Most telling of all though was the discovery of a tall, zig-zagging wall that encompassed

  • the entire residential and administrative area, with only a single opening.

  • This hinted that the design was not for decoration, but rather for security, with the wall's single

  • entry being easily defensible and keeping the residents and government workers safe

  • from attack.

  • But why would a large city in the heart of the Egyptian kingdom during its most prosperous

  • time in history need such protection?

  • This discovery might give further credence to the possibility that this lost city was

  • in fact directly responsible for the creation of religious items and temples dedicated to

  • Atenism.

  • Despite Akhenaten's command to abandon polytheism for Atenism, the move proved to be wildly

  • unpopular amongst most Egyptians.

  • Perhaps the city and its inhabitants found themselves under threat of attack by religious

  • terrorists, unhappy with Akhenaten's forced conversion of the nation.

  • Perhaps that's why the city was completely abandoned and forgotten by history until today.

  • Egypt's loss is our gain though, as archaelogists have discovered entire homes and workshops

  • full of tools and everyday items, giving them incredible new insights into the daily life

  • of ancient Egyptians.

  • Everything from regular household items to tools used for spinning and weaving, along

  • with metal and glassmaking slag has been discovered, all left behind almost as if the inhabitants

  • simply got up and left suddenly.

  • The complete abandonment of such a large industrial center clearly shows that someone was very

  • motivated to make sure this golden city be forgotten by history- and only a pharaoh would

  • have the power to give such a command.

  • Was this city crucial to Akhenaten's forced conversion of Egypt, a move that would have

  • him labeled a criminal by future pharaohs and his legacy almost completely wiped out

  • from history?

  • Were the inhabitants all murdered for their duplicity in the Amarna heresy that almost

  • tore Egypt in two at its most prosperous?

  • Why was an entire city so abruptly abandoned, to the point of entire households leaving

  • their belongings behind for the sands to swallow up?

  • Only time will tell as Egyptologists continue to work at the site, uncovering more and more

  • of the city day by day.

  • Now go watch Evidence reveals how the pyramids were actually built, or click this other video

  • instead!

The temperature is over 112 degrees.

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3,000 Year Old 'Lost Golden City' JUST FOUND in Egypt

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    Summer posted on 2021/04/24
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