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  • Would you buy products from a company that  collaborated with the Nazis during World War II?  

  • What if that company paid reparations, or  started a foundation as a way to apologize  

  • for their mistakes of the past? Or what  if the company refused to apologize,  

  • or admit they did anything wrong? Would you  still buy their products? We are about to  

  • look at several companies that had ties to the  Nazi party, or profited by selling products to  

  • the Nazis during World War II. All of  these companies are still around today,  

  • and we can almost guarantee you own one or more  of their products. Let's find out which ones.

  • If you've ever taken a picture using old school  film you've probably bought a product from Kodak.  

  • For decades after World War II Kodak kept  a sinister secret from the public. They had  

  • been Nazi collaborators during the war. Kodak  had subsidiaries in Germany and across Europe.  

  • Even as Germany's bold aspirations for  world domination grew in the 1930s,  

  • Kodak kept healthy buisness  relations with the Nazi party.

  • After all out war broke out and the United States  joined the Allies, the U.S. government mandated  

  • that companies could no longer do business  with Axis nations. This was a problem for  

  • many companies operating internationallyKodak being one of them. Kodak allowed their  

  • German branch to become more self-sufficient, and  eventually the Nazis took control of it. However,  

  • Kodak took things one step further to makeprofit. They began using their subsidiaries in  

  • neutral European countries, such as Switzerlandto continue doing business with Nazi Germany.

  • The subsidiaries in Europe continued  

  • selling photographic equipment and  electronics to the Nazis on behalf  

  • of Kodak. This meant that the Kodak corporation  was directly providing technology to the Nazis,  

  • and making a profit off it, all while hiding these  facts from the United States government. The heads  

  • of the Kodak company justified these actions by  citing the massive profits they were bringing in.  

  • Worst of all, the German branch of Kodak used  over 250 slave laborers from concentration camps.

  • After the war, Kodak reclaimed their German  subsidiary and collected on the large profits  

  • made by the slave laborers during the warKodak ended up paying $500,000 into a fund  

  • which provided reparations to families of  people who worked as slaves under their  

  • Nazi controled subsidiarybut the  company never actually apologized.

  • Volkswagen is clearly a German word, and it  probably doesn't surprise you that the company  

  • had ties to the Nazi party. However, what might  surprise you is that the company was actually  

  • started by the Nazis. Adolf Hitler himself laid  out the precursor to what would become Volkswagen.

  • The idea for the company started with Hitler  wanting to create a car for the common man,  

  • a “people's car.” This is  how Volkswagen got its name:  

  • Volksmeaning people andwagenmeaning carHitler hired Ferdinand Porsche to develop the car.  

  • This initiative was where the classic  Volkswagen Beetle got its shape. But,  

  • the new head of the organization which would  eventually become Volkswagen had bigger plans.  

  • Porsche insisted that the company also make  military vehicles to support the Reich.

  • The most influential of the these  vehicles was the Volkswagenbelwagen,  

  • which was a light military vehicle often seen in  World War II movies carrying around SS and Nazi  

  • officers. It had a boxy body and tire mounted  on the hood. During the time period that the  

  • Nazi party controled Germany, more than 15,000  slaves from concentration camps were used to  

  • build the Volkswagen cars. The company even  helped build the Arbeitsdorf concentration  

  • camp near one of their main factories to ensure  a steady supply of slave labor was available.

  • In 1998, under pressure from human rights  organizations, Volkswagen agreed to create  

  • a fund that would benefit the victims and  their families that were used as slave labor.

  • `Other companies benefited from large profits  gained by working with the Nazis in a different  

  • way. Several companies were started, or  acquired, by wealthy individuals whose  

  • fortune started with the money made from  dealings with the Nazi party. For example,  

  • the Reimann family who owns JAB Holdings profited  greatly from Nazi abuses and slave labor.

  • You may be unfamiliar with JAB Holdingsbut you probably know the companies they own  

  • such as: Krispy Kreme, Panera Breadand Pret a Manger. These companies were  

  • all created post World War II, however, their  financing was partly provided by JAB holdings,  

  • which unfortunately means they profited  indirectly from the atrocities of the  

  • Nazis. When this information was  made public, the Reiamann family  

  • said they were planning to donate around 11  million dollars tosuitable organizations.”

  • Coca-Cola is an American company. People around  the world associate Coke with beingAmerican.”  

  • When you think of the soda, an image of American  families or friends enjoying an ice cold beverage  

  • probably comes to mind. However, The  Coca-Cola Company had ties to the  

  • Nazi party during World War II. The drink  line Fanta, which includes commercials of  

  • people happily dancing to upbeat musicwas actually created for Nazi Germany.

  • As the Nazis came to power in 1933 Coca-Cola  was making enormous profits in Germany  

  • selling their products under the leadership of Max  Keith. He made the Coca-Cola brand more appealing  

  • to the German citizen, which resulted in a boost  in sales. He also knew how to market the product  

  • in a way that would make people around the world  want to buy Coca-Cola. During the 1936 Berlin  

  • Olympics Max Keith made sure that everyone in  attendance had as much Coke as they could drink.

  • As the Nazis prepared for war, they started to  limit the amount of foreign goods coming into  

  • the country. This included Coca-Cola syrupwhich began to hurt the company's profits.  

  • So, the sneaky Coke executives used a third  party to open a dialogue with Hermannring,  

  • Hitler's second in command. They convinced  him to allow the import of their syrup.

  • To boost sales even further Keith began promoting  the Coca-Cola company as pro-Nazi in Germany.  

  • His plan was to reach out to the Hitler Youth  and win over the younger generation of Nazis.  

  • This worked for a time, but as war broke out  restrictions on imports became stricter again.  

  • Max Keith had a new syrup created  in Germany using local products.  

  • This new soda became Fanta, based off of the  German wordfantasiewhich meansimagination.”

  • In 1941, when the United States joined the war,  

  • all official contact between the Coca-Cola company  and Max Keithe's German branch was cut off.  

  • Keith continued to sell his supply of actual  Coca-Cola syrup to the Nazi party members,  

  • and marketed the Fanta drink to the German  public. The German people quickly fell in  

  • love with the drink and Keith continued to  make large profits for the Coca-Cola company.

  • After the war ended, Coca-Cola took back control  of their German branch. They even reinstated the  

  • recently convicted Nazi collabortaor, Max Keithas its leader. The profits made from the German  

  • branch during the years of the Nazi regime  were funneled back into the main company.

  • If you are into high end fashion than  you may be surprised that one of the  

  • most successful fashion companies in the world  has deep ties to the Nazi party. Hugo Boss set  

  • up a fashion label in Germany two years  before the Nazi Party came into power.  

  • Even before the Nazis gained control of the  country Hugo Boss was a Nazi collaborator.  

  • The company itself had produced early  Nazi uniforms in their factories.

  • In 1931 Hugo Boss made it clear where his  allegences lie when he officially joined the  

  • Nazi party. He became a sponsoring member of the  Schutzstaffel and made monthly donations. Hugo  

  • Boss and his company created many uniforms  for the Nazis, and made large profits on  

  • outfitting their soldiers. The company also  produced uniforms for the SS and Hitler Youth.

  • In order to keep up with demand Hugo Boss began  employing slave labor from the concentration  

  • camps. It was reported that the company used  140 slaves from the camps and 40 prisoners of  

  • war from France to make their products. The  worst part was that many of these workers  

  • were either worked to death, or later sent to  Auschwitz or Buchenwald to be sentenced to death.

  • After the war, Hugo Boss was tried  and convicted for being a “supporter  

  • and beneficiary of National Socialism,”  and his right to own a company was taken  

  • away. The company continued on under Bossson-in-law Eugen Holy. In 1999 the company  

  • finally agreed to pay into a fund that was  set up to compensate former slave laborers.

  • If you've ever had a headache, or needed relief  from pain, you may have taken an Aspirin. Bayer,  

  • the company that makes the pain relievermay have one of the darkest histories when  

  • it comes to collaborating with the Nazi partyIn the 1930s Bayer was part of a company called  

  • IG Farben. It was a conglomerate made up  of several chemical companies in Germany.

  • As the Nazis swept through CzechoslovakiaIG Farben worked closely with the party to  

  • capture chemical factories to be used by the  corporation. The chemists who worked for Bayer,  

  • and were employed by IG Farben, later went on to  create Zyklon B; the gas used in concentration  

  • camps to quickly kill large numbers of Jews and  other people the Nazis labeled asundesirable.”

  • IG Farben also heavily used slave labor from  the same camps they provided Zyklon B to. It  

  • was a very messed up relationship between the  Nazis and IG Farben. They built a factory next  

  • to Auschwitz where they would use the prisoners  their product would later kill for slave labor.  

  • As the war came to an end, IG Farben was forced  to dissolve; the directors of the company were  

  • put on trial for war crimes. Unfortunatelyjustice was never served, and Fritz ter Meer,  

  • who was the director of operations at the  IG Farben facility at Auschwitz, became the  

  • president of Bayer after the war. In 1995 Bayer  apologized for their role in the Holocaust.

  • If you are watching this video you most likely are  using a device that has components built by IBM.  

  • The company, International Business Machines, has  been around since 1911. In 1933 the president of  

  • the company, Thomas Watson, traveled to Germany  to oversee an IBM factory being built there.  

  • At this time IBM was using a subsidiary  called Dehomag to do their work in Germany.

  • IBM's subsidary had been hired by the Nazi  party to carry out a nation wide census.  

  • The census itself was designed to identify  populations of ethnic groups that the  

  • Nazis found impure or undesirableThis included populations of Jews,  

  • Gypsies, and any ethnic group that would dilute  the Arian bloodlines of the country. IBM supplied  

  • the Nazis with punch cards and a sorting system  that would make it easy for them to identify,  

  • locate, and track any people that  they would later sentence to death.

  • These same machines and cards were later converted  and used to coordinate the trains bringing people  

  • to death camps across Nazi controlled territoriesIBM has come a long way since punch cards,  

  • but at the time this technology was bringing  in massive amounts of money for the company.

  • IBM continued to conduct business with the Germans  even after the United States joined the war.  

  • High ranking members of IBM falsified  data from their European subsidiaries  

  • to make sure they could smuggle in punch card  materials and devices that were in high demand  

  • by the Nazis. For IBM at the time the Nazi  buisness of killing was highly lucritive.

  • During World War II Nazi Germany was IBM's  largest territory after the United States.  

  • Now many computers and electronic devices use  parts created by IBM. The crazy part is that up  

  • until this day IBM has not appologized  for their complicity in the Holocaust.

  • A company's main purpose is to  make money; but at what cost?  

  • It is important to never forget the pastso we do not repeat the same mistakes.  

  • Collaberating with the Nazi party, and  being complicit in the attrocities they  

  • carried out during World War II, issteep price to pay to make a profit.

  • Now check outOldest Companies  In The World (OVER 800 YEARS).”  

  • Or watchMost Powerful Corporations  in the World?” Thanks for watching,  

  • and, as always, don't forget to likeshare, and subscribe. See you next time!

Would you buy products from a company that  collaborated with the Nazis during World War II?  

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Modern Companies that Collaborated with Nazis During World War 2

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    Summer posted on 2021/04/10
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