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  • Hello, everybody.

  • This is Elliot from E T.

  • J.

  • English.

  • Now, first of all, this might look a little bit different to you today.

  • I'm recording from basically the setup that I use when I teach on Skype.

  • So this is what most of my students see me like every day.

  • Um, this is the room that I work in.

  • Um, and the reason I'm doing it like this is because, quite honestly, I don't really have the time to make extremely professional videos at the moment.

  • So I'm sorry if the quality isn't good enough for you, but I really wanted to make a video for you today.

  • Um, this is just a bit of a quicker way for me to do it.

  • Anyway, I hope people been well today.

  • I've got quite a quick lesson for you.

  • I'm actually going to be talking to you a little bit about intonation, Okay?

  • Because this is one of my specialties.

  • Um, and this is just a very basic part of Internation.

  • This isn't the whole thing.

  • This is just one very small segment of what we need to know about intonation in British and in some cases, American English.

  • But what we're focusing on here is British English.

  • So what we're gonna do is I'm actually going to share my screen with you in a second, just like I do with my Skype students.

  • And I'm going to show you two different questions.

  • Now.

  • What I want you to do is I want you to try and repeat the questions just like me.

  • So try and say them exactly how I do and see if you notice the difference between the last words in the two different sentences the different tone that is used now, you might know this rule already, but let's just see what happens.

  • Okay, so here we go.

  • So as you can see here, we have two questions.

  • We have one question, a question where we're asking, Do you have a dog?

  • Okay.

  • And the second question is, what breed is it?

  • So first of all, let's just talk about this.

  • So the word breed?

  • Um, if somebody answered my question and they said Yes, I do have a dog then if I asked them what breed is it?

  • That would mean.

  • Is it a Labrador?

  • Is it a poodle?

  • What type of dog is it?

  • Okay, so that's what breed means.

  • That's a common question that might be asked to a dog owner, perhaps Anyway, so let's just go back to this.

  • So listen to how I say this first question, Okay?

  • Do you have a dog?

  • Do you have a dog?

  • There's something that's happening here on the last words.

  • Do you have a dog?

  • Okay, now compare it with this one.

  • What breed is it?

  • What breed is it?

  • Okay, so something's happening here on the last word here as well.

  • Okay, now, the first thing I need to tell you.

  • Okay, the first thing I need to tell you, I teach a lot of things on on YouTube.

  • Okay?

  • And sometimes if I teach something, people don't realize maybe that I say a particular word, like sometimes or usually now.

  • So I'm really going to stress this word.

  • This happens usually this rule, Okay?

  • Usually So don't tell me that I'm lying.

  • Because this doesn't happen every time.

  • Just usually, okay?

  • And what it is that happens every time is when we have a question.

  • Which is a yes.

  • No question.

  • Okay, so when the answer is a yes or a no usually okay, not all the time, but usually we will go up with our tone.

  • Okay, So listen to me again.

  • We've got Do you have a dog?

  • Do you have a dog?

  • Okay, so we're taking it up like that.

  • Do you have a dog?

  • And then take a look at this question.

  • It's a wh question or what?

  • We would call an open question.

  • So if I said to you, what breed is it you couldn't say?

  • Yes.

  • And you couldn't say no.

  • You have to tell me the actual answer.

  • And generally, usually not all the time.

  • The raw is that we would actually go down.

  • So listen to me about this open question.

  • What breed is it?

  • Or if you want me to pronounce all of my tease, what breed is it?

  • Okay, so on the it were generally going down.

  • We use a down tone.

  • Okay.

  • And this is this is definitely something that happens.

  • Okay, so yes, no question.

  • What happens is we turn a yes, no question into a rising tone.

  • And if we have an open question, open question or wh question, we turn it into a falling tone, we go down on the last word.

  • Okay, so let's just practice one more.

  • It's gonna go down here.

  • Take a look at this one.

  • First of all, let's talk about what's in here.

  • Coming over.

  • That's the question.

  • Are you coming over tonight?

  • Okay, so this question is, um, first of all, Yes, it is a yes.

  • No question.

  • Okay, so we know what's happening here.

  • We go up.

  • Okay.

  • Um, the words coming over this phrase Are you coming over tonight?

  • That means are you going to visit me at my house tonight?

  • Or wherever I live or stay?

  • Are you coming over?

  • It means are you going to visit me?

  • Okay, so listen to this.

  • Are you coming over tonight?

  • Okay, so there's two different ways of kind of doing it, But usually what will happen is we will take that rising tone up on the last word.

  • Okay.

  • And let's take a look at the next one.

  • Good.

  • Fraser, get off work.

  • When do you get off work?

  • Now, that means what time do you finish work When you get off work, It's when you finish good phrase over.

  • Okay, so we know that this is an open question.

  • mainly, first of all, because it begins with a w h word, but also because we can't say yes or no to this or else we'd sound a bit weird.

  • So what happens here?

  • We go down.

  • Okay.

  • So take a look at this.

  • When do you get off work?

  • When do you get off work?

  • Okay.

  • Now, don't worry about the connected speech and stuff that I'm doing there.

  • I will teach that in another lesson.

  • The main thing to focus on is the intonation.

  • So let's compare the two and practice with me.

  • You coming over tonight?

  • And also, when do you get off work?

  • When do you get off work?

  • So this is just one rule of intonation.

  • There are many, many different rules, Many different things that we do.

  • I can teach you the rules, but the best way to practice is with someone who knows what they're doing.

  • Um, and that's me.

  • So if you'd like to book a Skype lessons, you're more than welcome to Okay.

  • It'll be great to meet you and to help you with your British pronunciation or British English in general.

  • Um, so hopefully I'll meet some of you soon But anyway, it was great to teach this lesson today.

  • I hope you found it useful.

  • I'm sorry that I've been away for a while, but I'm back now.

  • Please let me know if you have any other things that you'd like me to teach you in these free lessons.

  • Um, take care.

  • Give me a thumbs up.

  • 50,000 subscribers now.

  • Unbelievable.

  • I can't believe it.

  • Um, but yeah.

  • See you guys soon.

  • Cheers.

  • Bye.

Hello, everybody.

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