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  • He gets up in the morning when he feels like he's  had enough sleep, so that means no alarms need to  

  • go off. He has a healthy breakfast and spends some  quality time with the people in his home. His days  

  • are regularly taken up by meetings, but he hates  it when they're crowded. When he returns home from  

  • work, he likes to eat unusual food for dinner and  he always tries to help with washing the dishes.  

  • He then watches a bit of TV - Star Trek if it's  on - and then he goes to bed at a reasonable time.

  • Well, that doesn't sound very  interesting for a billionaire, does it?

  • We might also add that he spends around  $1.6 million a year on security. When he's  

  • at work his office is protected by $180,000  bulletproof panels. When he's not working,  

  • he likes to take the kids on his private  jet or for an adventure in a submarine.

  • This is course is not the life of a mere  millionaire. It's the life of a billionaire,  

  • a famous one, too. The one and only  Jeff Bezos (net worth $185.1 billion).  

  • At least it was how he lived a few years  ago according to various media stories.

  • The day-to-day life of millionaires and  billionaires can of course be vastly different  

  • even when we're not talking about security and  very expensive hobbies. How an ultra-rich tech  

  • CEO and a member of a royal family live are two  very different worlds. A guy who made millions  

  • as a high-ranking member of a crime family  will very likely have a different routine from  

  • some kid who was born a millionaire and spends  most of his time posting photos on Instagram.

  • Saying that, there are some  commonalities in how the rich live,  

  • either the ultra-rich or the just a bit rich.

  • Let's start with the billionaire lifestyle.

  • If you're one of the top billionaires, it's highly  likely you'll have hired 24-hour a day security.  

  • That means at home; when you go to the  office, and while you're at the office.

  • When it comes to security, it seems out of  the tech billionaires it's Mark Zuckerberg  

  • (net worth $96.7 billion) who spends the most,  

  • or at least Facebook spends the cash. The last  numbers we can find said his security costs in  

  • the region of $23 million per year, but his  private aircraft costs another $2.95 million.

  • So, personal freedom is one of the  biggest differences between the ultra-rich  

  • to the mere millionaire types. Obviously,  

  • we can't tell you everything about their  security because that would mean it sucked,  

  • but some things do make it into the press. There  were rumors back in 2016 that Zuckerberg planned  

  • to build four new houses on his compound, except  one of those houses was a giant panic room.

  • As for when he's at work, it's said he has what  the media called a “Praetorian Guardaround  

  • him at all times. If someone gets funny ideas  about taking the CEO down with a rugby tackle,  

  • they won't even get close to  him. If that's not excessive,  

  • it's said in a conference room he has an  office protected with bullet-proof glass.  

  • There's a panic button, tooAccording to rumors, and we repeat  

  • rumors, he has a panic chute, too. Where it  takes him we can't say, if it exists at all.

  • Like many billionaires, there's an armed guard  outside his personal residence at all times.  

  • If he does go out in public, where he's going  will be vetted and swept before he even steps  

  • foot in the place. Obviously, he doesn't go  anywhere without this highly-trained entourage.

  • That doesn't sound like much fun at all. It's  almost like being imprisoned by your wealth.  

  • But what about millionaires, maybe they  can say, “Millionaires have more fun.”

  • We guess it all depends on how many millions you  have. There are a thousand million in one billion,  

  • so there's a big difference between having  sold a few Bitcoin and got yourself 1.2 million  

  • and someone who has 836 millionIt also depends on where you live,  

  • because a few million in some countries  is a fortune and it could mean the risk  

  • of someone kidnapping your  kids and asking for a ransom.

  • Still, not all very rich millionaires  have round-the-clock security.

  • Take for instance the actors Keanu Reeves and  Jake Gyllenhaal, guys who like to ride the  

  • subway. The former is said to have a net worth of  around $350 million and the latter, $80 million.  

  • Let's just add here that net worth's for  celebrities change a lot depending on the  

  • resource you're looking at. As for billionairestheir net worth changes like the wind, so  

  • what we say at the time of writing might be very  different from when you watch the show...Yes,  

  • we've been reading your comments  about us getting net worths wrong.

  • Many actors in fact don't have  any fancy security detail,  

  • especially when they're doing their day-to-day  stuff. When Brad Pitt (net worth $300 million) and  

  • Angeline Jolie (net worth $160 millionwere together they had a bodyguard, even so,  

  • they were once spotted riding on a scooter  in Vietnam not even wearing helmets. It's  

  • also said when in Asia they'd spend up to  $20,000 a night on their luxurious lodgings.

  • Many multi millionaires you won't be surprised to  hear have personal chefs. Occasionally those chefs  

  • kiss and tell, talking about who the fussy eaters  are and what strange foods they like to eat.  

  • One personal chef said the job was fun in  that he got to travel around on yachts,  

  • but he also said he was on call all the  time and generally worked 15-hour days.  

  • Another chef who refused to say much about the  people he worked with said celebrities hardly  

  • ever leave the house. Like the billionairesthey're somewhat trapped by their status.

  • That doesn't sound like much fun. Chef Kat  Turner, who'd worked with a bunch of celebs  

  • said her clients at times demanded the  utmost privacy, meaning some celeb chefs  

  • have to almost be invisible. That, she  said, makes the job a lonely one. It seems  

  • she at least had fun working with the  Smashing Pumpkin's frontman, Billy Corrigan  

  • (net worth $60 million). She said he ate simply  and most of the food she made for him was very  

  • healthy. She said she worked hard but he also  worked 12 hours a day, six or seven days a week.

  • What about your regular millionaires. Do  they require bodyguards and personal chefs

  • A bodyguard from the UK was asked about thatHe said it all depends on where you are working.  

  • A person with not many millions or even a solitary  million might walk around with bodyguards in the  

  • poorest nations on Earth, but in a place like  England, he said you pass them in the supermarket  

  • every day and you wouldn't know that they were  what he called part of the Upper Middle Class.

  • Consider that the average house price  in West London is around $1.5 million,  

  • being a millionaire in some of London's  swankier suburbs isn't a big deal at all.  

  • There will be no personal chefs for the folks  who can just call themselves a millionaire,  

  • no bodyguards, and certainly no super-yacht.

  • Just like the in the U.S., they will have more  time than regular working folks to focus on  

  • personal growth, to enjoy hobbies, to have the  time to talk in-depth to their kids' teachers.  

  • They will also strategize about what they do  with their wealth. According to some experts,  

  • mere millionaires on the bottom rung of the  ladder are actually very careful with their money.

  • When 600 millionaires in the US were questioned in  a survey, many of them said they spent below their  

  • means. Even though they had a big income, they  weren't rich enough to go crazy with their cash,  

  • so being frugal was the way to go. Most of them  didn't live in a house that was super-costly in  

  • relation to their wage. There was no showing  off going on. Most of them lived in a place  

  • they could comfortably afford. Many of them  even managed to save around half of the pay  

  • they received each year. Put it this wayif you're a millionaire with a $250,000  

  • a year salary it's unlikely you'll be  spending $20,000 a night on a hotel room.

  • Nonetheless, in another survey of regular  millionaires, most of the people interviewed  

  • said they didn't budget. They had enough  cash to know that if they were sensible  

  • everything was going to be ok. If you  have a million in the bank you don't  

  • really need to worry too much about  buying a pair of Louis Vuitton shoes.

  • Entrepreneurs who hit the millionaire  mark apparently like to have side  

  • hustles. They start looking for  new streams of income, and why not,  

  • they have a safety blanket. The problem  with being poor or even middle-class is  

  • not having enough time to get out of your  situation because you're working so hard.

  • If lower millionaires are not working on their  ideas, they will likely be investing their cash in  

  • index funds or in the property market. When  they are not doing that, millionaires on  

  • average spend more time exercising than the  poor, or doing yoga, or going to steam baths,  

  • or taking archery lessons, or just reading  books. This is how one person put it when  

  • talking to Business Insider, “Successful  individuals are keenly aware of how they  

  • spend their resources, including their  emotional and cognitive resources.”

  • Ah, precious time, it's such a valuable resource  and the working poor often doesn't get enough of  

  • it to focus on their personal development. Sowith the lower end of the millionaire ladder,  

  • safety and comfort and personal development  are the big luxuries. And just to give you  

  • guys some hope, in some of the surveys we  read, many of the millionaires didn't do  

  • exceptionally well in school or college, and  quite a few didn't even finish high-school.

  • Now let's get back to the very rich.

  • Ok, so not all multi-millionaires are careful with  their cash, after all, they rarely have to be.  

  • It's not easy to fritter away many millions  of dollars. Some have tried hard, though.

  • Take for instance the movie star, Johnny DeppReports surfaced not too long ago that he was  

  • spending in the region of $30,000 a month just on  wine. It's also reported that he bought a town in  

  • France that cost him $75 million. Before that  acquisition, he bought a chain of islands in  

  • the Bahamas for $3.6 million. He even spent  $3 million in 2005 on his friend's funeral,  

  • Gonzo journalist Hunter S. Thompson. That  was according to a lawsuit. Depp's lawyer  

  • argued that he only spent $2 million on  blasting Thompson's ashes from a cannon.

  • According to an article in CNBC, when he was  raking in the cash his lifestyle alone cost  

  • him $2 million a month. It's thought  he's worth around $200 million now,  

  • but you could triple that not too long ago.

  • When that lawsuit was brought against  him, his monthly costs were made public,  

  • so that's how we know so much. On top of  his expensive wine habit, he also spent  

  • $300,000 a month on his 40 employees. What  they all did we don't exactly know, but we're  

  • guessing Mr. Depp unlike Mr. Bezos didn't get  dry skin from all the dishwashing he was doing.  

  • Depp spent another $150,000 a month on security  and his family, and a further $200,000 a month  

  • for his private jet. In conclusion, if you  want to get rid of a fortune, ask Johnny Depp.

  • But here's the real-life  story of Brewster's Millions.

  • Wasting tons of cash is easily done, especially  if you have a devil-may-care attitude such  

  • as Depp or you were brought up poor and  never really learned how to handle cash.  

  • That happened to a 19-year old in England after he  won the lottery in 2002. His windfall was almost  

  • ten million pounds, which in today's money in  dollars is about $21 million. Needless to say,  

  • he quit his job as a garbage man -  “bin manas they say in England.

  • This teenager, who learned to read and write in  prison, was turned down for a private bank account  

  • because of his colorful criminal record. He  gave lots of money away to family and friends,  

  • made some bad investments, and even paid  a ton of cash to fight a celebrity on TV.  

  • He was arrested not long after that for  being caught firing steel balls at store  

  • windows from his Mercedes Benz. Just five  years after the win, and a lot of houses,  

  • cars, and drugs later, he was  pretty much broke. In 2010,  

  • he was back to working collecting people's  garbage and he said he was happier doing that.

  • So, these are two examples of how  people threw away fortunes. It's  

  • not something you hear billionaires doing often.

  • Ok, so we always hear about Bezos  getting his hands dirty and how Warren  

  • Buffet (net worth $85.6 billion) religiously  eats hamburgers, ice cream, and Coke, but  

  • isn't that just to make us ordinary folks think  they're just like us? How do they really live?

  • Let's look at the Russian billionaire named  Roman Abramovich (net worth $14.5 billion).  

  • As we write this, the media is talking  about the yacht he bought for $610 million.  

  • Just the upkeep and running of this  yacht costs him $65 million a year.  

  • Many billionaires own yachts. One  of them, whose name was withheld,  

  • was asked why. This was his reply: “You're going to think I'm crazy.  

  • I'll tell you why. It's because I'm OCD  about toilets and germs! If I rented a yacht,  

  • I would be sharing a toilet with people  that I don't know. So I purchased my own.”

  • Unlike lower millionaires, they can  make the world fit to their whims.

  • Abramovich is the owner of a Premier  division soccer team in England,  

  • too. That's another thing billionaires like to dobuy sports teams. In the aforementioned division,  

  • teams have belonged to Chinese  billionaires, Thai billionaires,  

  • and billionaires from the Middle East. We're  not sure about all of them, but for some,  

  • including Abramovich, watching their team  play might be one of their past times.

  • Not all billionaires have fancy carsbut that's because most of them don't  

  • drive around in their own cars. Elon Musk (net  worth $166.1 billion) has a collection of cars,  

  • including his own Tesla's, but billionaires  are generally not into showing off. It's more  

  • likely that millionaires will be the ones buying  top-of-the-range Rolls Royce's and Bugatti's.  

  • Billionaires are happier in submarines  doing some kind of deepwater expedition.

  • Do they walk around the house  in the most expensive garments?

  • Possibly, if they're royal, but it's unlikely  if they are self-made rich folks. Look at  

  • Elon Musk on his two times on the Joe  Rogan (net worth $100 million) podcast.  

  • As we write this he's the richest man in  the world but on that show, he looked like  

  • he'd just finished his shift at Taco Bell. He also mixed the ice in his whisky with his  

  • fingers. Billionaires don't have to act like  they're rich. They've peaked already. Instead,  

  • they play their wealth down. This is how one  writer and friend of a billionaire put it

  • When meeting with my billionaire friend  in his home, he wears Nike flip-flops,  

  • worn-out jeans, and t-shirts. Oncehe even came downstairs to meet me,  

  • featuring a fresh ketchup stain on his shirt.”

  • That doesn't mean to say on the wall of their  houses they don't have incredibly expensive  

  • paintings. Next time you go around to Bill  Gate's (net worth $136.6 million) house for  

  • dinner ask him where he hangs his $36 million  dollar painting, “Lost on the Grand Banks.”

  • In fact, ask to see his entire collectionIt's worth many more millions. It's said  

  • business magnate David Geffen (net worth $9.7  billion) has an art collection worth $2 billion,  

  • so don't be fooled by the flip-flopsWe are guessing no billionaires in  

  • the world hold back on luxuries all the time. Still, as one friend of a billionaire put it,  

  • they are so rich they value the normal stuffUnlike some millionaires who hire expensive  

  • high-end chefs to cook for them, some of the  ultra-rich get off on cooking as a family. That's  

  • exactly why Mr. Bezos scrapes dried macaroni off  disheseven if they are dishes made by Versace.

  • Now you need to watch, “Spend $1 Billion Dollars  In 24 Hours or LOSE IT ALL - CHALLENGE.” Or,  

  • have a look at, “Why Winning The Lottery  Is The Worst Thing That Can Happen To You.”

He gets up in the morning when he feels like he's  had enough sleep, so that means no alarms need to  

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Millionaires vs Billionaires - How Do They Live?

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    林宜悉 posted on 2021/03/26
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