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  • Bill Gates.

  • Beyonce.

  • Oprah.

  • The Infographics Show.

  • For years rumors have swirled that powerful organizations and celebrities have all been

  • part of a global movement to control humanity and shape the way it thinks.

  • In most cases, this movement takes the form of the infamous Illuminati- a group allegedly

  • dedicated to absolute control over all mankind.

  • But who actually are the Illuminati, what do they really want?

  • And how do you know this video itself is not just more Illuminati propaganda meant to throw

  • you off the scent from the truth?

  • The name Illuminati actually comes from the Latin plural, illuminatus, or 'enlightened'.

  • The name is inspired by the idea of enlightening oneself through knowledge, and would evolve

  • to signify the breaking of man's bonds of ignorance through education and reason.

  • But it all started with one man, who really, really hated his bosses.

  • Adam Weishaupt was born in 1748, and in 1773 he gained employment at the University of

  • Ingolstadt as a professor of Canon Law- basically the laws which governed canons both on a battlefield

  • and those on ships.

  • Ok fine, actually Canon Law is the guidelines and regulations which are established by a

  • religious authority for the purpose of running the government of a religious organization.

  • In essence, Weishaupt was an expert on church law, but was himself not actually a member

  • of the clergy.

  • This would be a bit of a problem in a university which was mostly run by clergy- and not just

  • any clergy, but Jesuits.

  • Jesuits were themselves established in the 16th century, with the approval of Pope Paul

  • III.

  • Their official mission was global evangelization, with a special focus in education and helping

  • different sects of Christians to work together.

  • Jesuits were sort of the Seal Team Six of Christianity, and were told to expect to go

  • anywhere in the world and suffer any adversity for the sake of helping the poor and uneducated.

  • Jesuits however soon became a thorn in the side of the European powers, as they were

  • a little too good at their job.

  • Jesuits established special settlements in many colonial territories, and refused to

  • allow the populations under their care to be enslaved as local governments and businessmen

  • wished to.

  • With slave labor being critical to the economies of far-flung colonies, Jesuits very quickly

  • got a bad rap for standing in the way of economic progress.

  • It should be noted that Jesuits weren't completely opposed to slavery- you have to remember that

  • this was a time when slavery was a widespread and accepted practice... white Europeans themselves

  • had been enslaved just several hundred years earlier.

  • Jesuits were however opposed to the brutal conditions slaves endured, seeing no need

  • for slaves to be treated like animals.

  • Nothing, not even religion, can stand in the way of economic progress, so in 1773 Pope

  • Clement XIV ordered the dissolution of the Jesuit order.

  • However in many places the Jesuits remained in power, such as the University of Ingolstadt,

  • where Adam Weishaupt found himself teaching.

  • Under attack from all sides, the Jesuits in control of the university attempted to suppress

  • any staff that wasn't part of the clergy, including Weishaupt himself.

  • Frustrated by what he believed were outdated views, Weishaupt turned to Freemasonry, but

  • by this point the Freemason order had become a day club for rich kids who wanted to play

  • at philosophy- as opposed to today where it's a day club for bored middle aged men who want

  • to play at philosophy.

  • Unsatisfied, Weishaupt decided he'd make his own, even cooler club, and only his very best

  • friends- or those he thought worthy- could join.

  • At first six to nine of Weishaupt's best buds joined his secret new club, which Weishaupt

  • created in order to spread the ideas of the enlightenment.

  • Despite what your edgelord Facebook bestie may rant about on his wall, the Illuminati

  • wasn't interested inliberating man from religion”, but rather, wished to reform

  • the way that religion was practiced and imposed.

  • Weishaupt believed that science and religion should be partners, not competitors, in defining

  • the world, and that people should have a free choice when it came to either.

  • The first illuminati had three membership tiers: novice, minerval, and illuminated minerval-

  • with minerval referring to the Roman goddess of wisdom, Minerva.

  • Their goal was to create a “state of liberty and moral equality”, the only problem was

  • that the powers that be had little interest in such a radical agenda for its time.

  • If commoners were free after all, well, then how could they possibly be exploited for personal

  • gain?

  • This is an idea free market capitalists struggle with to this day.

  • Heavily influenced by Freemasonry, or really just blatantly ripping it off, Weishaupt created

  • a series of elaborate rituals to be practiced at Illuminati meetings.

  • Members were given secret names taken out of their favorite parts of antiquity- Weishaupt

  • himself for example took the name of Spartacus, no doubt because he saw himself as leading

  • a rebellion of mental slaves fighting for their freedom.

  • As the membership roster grew from nine individuals to 2,500 though it was clear more ranks were

  • needed, and Weishaupt created 13 degrees of initiations split up into three classes.

  • The first few orders of initiates were known as illuminatus minor, then came the illuminatus

  • dirigens, and lastly, the top tier of Illuminati were simply known as the kings.

  • We're not saying that Weishaupt lost the plot somewhere along the way, but a man who set

  • out to enlighten people and free them from oppressive government and ideology both, ended

  • up making a secret society where he was king.

  • And that really speaks to the futility of man.

  • So what did the Illuminati actually do?

  • Well, they attempted to spread the ideas of enlightenment and reform throughout the upper

  • crust of European society, but were never in fact in any way close to political power

  • of their own.

  • The high point of this secret society would come in 1777, when Charles Theodore took the

  • throne of Bavaria and used the opportunity to spread the same liberal values the Illuminati

  • themselves were espousing.

  • However, Charles Theodore would prove to be a weak monarch, and soon the ruling elites

  • pressured him to back off the liberalization of Bavaria.

  • This would eventually lead to a direct crackdown on the Illuminati itself, with their liberal

  • agenda deemed a danger to the security and safety of the state.

  • The Illuminati basically killed itself, as its members boasted publicly of the power

  • they wielded- though they wielded little said power-, and openly criticized the monarchy,

  • something that only America could afford to do because it was exactly thousands of miles

  • away from the nearest monarch.

  • Membership lists of Illuminati members began to be leaked to the public, and the discovery

  • of many Illuminati in positions of moderate power led to a general panic over secret societies

  • amongst the ruling elite.

  • Charles Theodore banned any and all secret societies, causing Weishaupt to flee for his

  • life.

  • Today the Illuminati are blamed for everything from war, to poverty in third world nations,

  • to Harambe, and yet the historical fact is that the Illuminati was never more than a

  • moderately successful boy's club that managed to wield a small amount of power in Bavaria

  • before it was disbanded.

  • Conspiracy theories nevertheless abound concerning a modern Illuminati, probably because it's

  • more comfortable for people to believe that even when insane, really stupid stuff is being

  • done by our governments it's because someone is secretly pulling the strings to a master

  • plan- instead of the simple truth that sometimes we put idiots in charge.

  • But then again that's exactly what we would say if we were secretly part of the Illuminati.

  • Now go watch super secret societies that pull strings without you knowing.

  • Or watch this other video instead.

  • Obey!

Bill Gates.

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What Actually ARE the Illuminati?

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    林宜悉 posted on 2021/03/12
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