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  • I usually don't start here, but I thought maybe we could start here today with growing up in London, you know, growing up in Camden.

  • You know, it's funny.

  • I go to Camden now occasionally, and I kind of call it now the Camden Theme park.

  • I don't know if you agree with me, but it seems like you go to the Canon theme park and you can experience what Camden was like maybe 20 years ago, 15 years ago on Dino.

  • Musicians complain about this, too.

  • Sometimes they say that it's not really where the independent music is that kind of thing.

  • But what was it like growing up in Camden for you?

  • And how has it changed?

  • Um, for me, I wasn't tired to that one specific area, so I lived there.

  • But my step that was the stage manager of the Hackney Empire Fear.

  • So I spent 34 days of the week there.

  • A lot of my cousins lived in south London.

  • My dad lived out of London, West Sussex on my friends is teenagers, lived kind of loosely between Tottenham and has been so I spent ah lot of time all over London, really?

  • On I think growing up in London as a whole and Cameron was perhaps the most extreme reflection of that is the side by side.

  • Inequality is what is what is what really strikes me.

  • Now.

  • I'm older and I looked back and I looked at my childhood friends, and I see who's done well, Well, got good jobs and living nice lives.

  • And who hasn't?

  • You could have almost predicted it six years old, five years old, from the way in which people entered the world, the kinds of family backgrounds they were from.

  • Economically, culturally, ethnically, you could have added up a whole load of factors and pretty much predicted where everyone was gonna end up.

  • And sadly, that is how it is turned out.

  • So it makes me reflect, really on social conditioning and the engineering of inequality.

  • There's a few exceptions to that myself being one of them.

  • I didn't grow up with my dad.

  • We didn't have a whole lot of money, But then I had some odds in my favor.

  • I had a library in my house as a child.

  • Growing up, my mom was always into reading, always into education, kind of pushed that on me I had, or God, far from my stepfather, who are around.

  • You know, I experience some some bad things by experience, some really good things that maybe have pulled me in the direction of I've gone.

  • But then partly it was just luck.

  • I'd be lying if I said I was never involved in any problems that could have let me in in the other way.

  • So really, I think my greatest reflection on somewhere like Cameron going to school with Children whose parents were millionaires and then Children whose those of us who were grew up on and off quote unquote benefits on you were interacting with all these kinds while I was in the lower struck off what we're talking about, you know, Like I said, it was just my mom and we grew up on and off those kind of problems.

  • I lived in a council house.

  • I was lucky I didn't live on the estate.

  • I live two streets from the estate, So, like I said, I kind of was in between, and that even though economically I was, I was worse off.

  • Culturally, I was kind of equipped in many ways to deal with the world that would confront me.

  • I went to a special Saturday school, taught me alternative kind of history, so always led me in in a kind of conscious path and in a path that would there was some of the nonsense we also taught in school.

  • But but it's really that that most stuck with me, that the intergenerational inequality, even in a wealthy place like blonde.

  • What were the key factors in some of your peer group that turned out, you know, in the quote unquote bad ways or didn't go?

  • You know, I guess, ultimately, where they wanted to go.

  • Was it Was it lack of the family?

  • Was it socioeconomic?

  • Was it pure economic?

  • I think it's all of the above.

  • I think it's It's It's economic, It's social, it's cultural, it's racial, it's it's your condition is your family circumstance.

  • But it's also the larger society on its even school.

  • Even though we have access to education, which is a massive benefit compared to many other places in the world, education is off putting in the current way that is too many people, the things that were taught in school or for authoritarian relationship between student and teacher, the dictatorial relationship then, particularly with a subject like history.

  • But even his history impinges on maths and science and art and all these other things.

  • That kind of Eurocentric curriculum is off put into a lot of people the glorification of monarchy, even if people can't articulate these things directly.

  • Even if students cannot say this is what I think is bullshit about school, they just have a feeling.

  • And so I think many of the students there are rebellious, often the most gifted, particularly from lower socioeconomic backgrounds, often the most gifted students.

  • You know, there was a famous study.

  • I don't know the exact statistics but was looking at what percentage of people in prison had above Einstein's IQ.

  • And there is a portion of people in prison if you go from countries, countries that have this high level of I.

  • Q.

  • And I would argue that actually, at 567 years old, this mold, this kind of industrial revolution, learning by rote, preparing us to be served to work in factories, mode of education that well being asked to fin this one size fits all education doesn't fit everybody, and many of the people that are rebellion against it, Einstein included.

  • Who's the guy everyone holds up?

  • Is the worldwide measure of intelligence.

  • We know that his schoolteacher wasn't a fan of him.

  • Did he have a degrees even?

  • I mean, he wasn't necessarily Anak aed Emmick by any means not from my understanding.

  • But I know that there's a famous quote of his schoolteacher telling him he wouldn't amount to anything.

  • Okay, Okay, So it's him and a few others, probably so many of us, Right?

  • So I'm saying many geniuses are wasted because of societies, preconceived notions of identity because off the approach.

  • And I'm not saying I was a genius.

  • What I will say, though, is the way teachers dealt with me in my schools and my brightness wasn't as you'd expect teachers to often do it, but I had some teachers that were very encouraging of it.

  • I had other teachers that felt that person from my racial, cultural, economic background, and certainly from my socioeconomic background, should not have been top of the class.

  • And that pissed him off and they were clear about it.

  • That's what was interesting.

  • That 789 years old, my question in my display of intelligence was viewed as frightening and not as something to be encouraged.

  • And I learned that very early that actually this intelligence made certain sections of adult society uncomfortable so you would play it down sometimes subconsciously, sometimes.

  • And I think I think conversely, you're gonna play up your ignorance.

  • You know, if ignorance is what is encouraged and rewarded and you have sports are encouraged and given the thumbs up.

  • But being good at math is Sina's not for people like you.

  • Which one are you going to gravitate towards?

  • Which one are you socially rewarded for?

  • On DSO?

  • I'm saying all of these factors, if we could put them in a kind of some kind of mathematical equation, amount to a society where prisons are full of poor people generally and then the racial disproportion within prison or what they are.

  • You know, where women do not end up being astrophysicist per se, not because women are not necessarily less good at science but because from very young they talk as a woman.

  • You don't wanna be clever and a guy you know if you're clever and the goddess unattractive and obviously a woman's ultimate aim in life is to get married right and to have Children.

  • That's all women should care about.

  • So I'm saying these conditions work on many levels and they produce a result.

  • But I think that we act like in a society like this, particularly that education and politics and economics a kind of benign we don't We're not encouraged to analyze what we were live in, a society that is a result of a particular set of people's ideas, yeah.

I usually don't start here, but I thought maybe we could start here today with growing up in London, you know, growing up in Camden.

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GROWING UP: What It Was Like Growing Up In Camden & Noticing The Side-By-Side Inequality - Akala

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    林宜悉 posted on 2020/12/26
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