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  • Soon cops will raid Edward Gein's house, and what they find there won't just disturb

  • them, it'll break them.

  • Many will never be the same after that, but today, Edward scoops one last spoonful of

  • soup from a bowl he's fashioned from a human skull.

  • He then empties the remnants of the soup into a wastebasket made from skin.

  • Today is a big day for Ed; he's finally finished stitching together a very special

  • suit he's made.

  • Illuminated by the light of a lamp that's covered with what looks like faces, Ed first

  • slips on a pair of leggings that look like, er, legs.

  • Next, he slips into his corset, a garment that once served as part of the torso of a

  • woman.

  • He pulls everything tight with a belt decorated with, you guessed it, bits of what used to

  • be a person.

  • He's almost ready now, there's just one last piece to his new outfit to put on: a

  • human face mask.

  • He looks in the mirror and thinks, “Perfect.”

  • He's finally become his mother; his masterpiece is complete.

  • Reeling with joy, he runs into the garden and dances under a full moon.

  • We are talking now about possibly the strangest serial killer to have ever walked the planet.

  • His story is like no other.

  • Ed was truly unique in his depravity, and that's why he's inspired movies such as

  • The Texas Chain Saw MassacreandSilence of the Lambs”.

  • But if there's one movie that fits Ed's life like a glove, it's “Psycho.”

  • We are sure you'll agree after you've watched this story that Mr. Edward Gein was

  • a true American psycho.

  • The question is, how did he get away with his crimes for so long.

  • Did no one in that small town of his not wonder if there was anything a little bit strange

  • about the man?

  • His entire house was full of things made from human body parts.

  • To do that he needed quite the stock of bodies.

  • How did he get them?

  • How did he manage to do it without the local cops noticing?

  • But first, let's go back in time and talk about the young Ed.

  • How did a young man become such a monster, a guy that would become known as theButcher

  • of Plainfield?”

  • Edward Theodore Gein was born on August 27, 1906, in a place called La Crosse County in

  • the state of Wisconsin.

  • His parents, George and Augusta, had one other son named Henry.

  • Life wasn't easy for the family.

  • George couldn't hold down a job for long and support his wife and sons for the simple

  • fact he devoted much of his time to something other than his family.

  • That thing was whiskey.

  • Augusta, someone who you might call a controlling matriarch, wasn't happy with the life she

  • had.

  • To try and improve matters, she made the decision to move the family across counties to the

  • small rural village of Plainfield.

  • There they would work on an isolated farm, barely ever seeing the 700 or so other residents

  • of the village.

  • The two boys went to the local school, but it seemed to the teachers that there was something

  • wrong with the boys.

  • Ed had this habit of just laughing out loud for no good reason.

  • He didn't have many friends, and even if he did make friends his mother would soon

  • put a stop to the relationship.

  • You see, to understand Ed's later behavior you really need to know a thing or two about

  • his mother.

  • She might have had an alcoholic husband who often returned home stinking of the demon

  • liquor, a man who could barely put food on the table, but she was no angel herself.

  • She not only despised her own husband, but she despised everyone besides her kids.

  • The only reason she didn't ask for a divorce was that it went against her religious beliefs.

  • When not in school both Ed and Henry weren't allowed off the farm.

  • Augusta's reasoning was that most people were evil.

  • She preached to the boys daily about the depravity of mankind, reading chapters from the bible

  • about the fires of hell awaiting most folks.

  • She told her kids that those who take to the bottle will meet with eternal damnation.

  • She told them that women were loose, they couldn't be trusted, and they too would

  • one day have a date with the devil.

  • Of course, Augusta said she was not one of those women.

  • She was moral.

  • She had committed herself to God.

  • Her bible was her blueprint for life.

  • We don't need to tell you that this kind of overbearing mothering isn't great for

  • kids, especially when you throw demons and hellfire into the mix.

  • We'll get to the crimes soon, but you need to know a little bit more about Ed's pre-skin-suit

  • life.

  • The whisky eventually killed George when Ed and Henry were in their thirties.

  • After that, both men worked on the farm and did odd jobs around the village to make ends

  • meet.

  • They did handiwork for locals, but something Ed really enjoyed doing was babysitting.

  • Yep, the Butcher of Plainfield was great with kids, likely because his own development had

  • been arrested due to his mother's strictness.

  • This is what one of the townsfolks actually said about Ed's way with kids, “Good old

  • Ed.

  • Kind of a loner and maybe a little bit odd with that sense of humor of his, but just

  • the guy to call to sit in with the kiddies.”

  • And get this, people still sent their kids to stay with Ed long after his mother died.

  • Some of those kids told their parents that they'd seen shrunken heads and strange masks

  • around his house, but the parents dismissed this as the kids being over-imaginative.

  • So, Augusta still had a firm grip on Ed's mind even though the child had grown into

  • a man.

  • Henry had at least managed to get into a relationship with a local woman, but Ed was still too attached

  • to his mom to think about another woman.

  • Henry would actually talk to others about how Ed was way too obsessed with their religious

  • zealot of a mom, and when Ed heard this, he wasn't too happy.

  • He didn't want to hear anyone talking badly about Augusta.

  • With that in mind, what happened when Ed was 38-years-old might not surprise you.

  • There was a huge fire at the farm.

  • Firefighters were called and managed to quell the flames, and then they left.

  • Ed later called the police department and told the cops he couldn't find his brother.

  • A search party went out at night with their lanterns glowing all over the farm and they

  • eventually found Henry.

  • He was dead.

  • He wasn't burned at all, he was just lying on the ground with his face in the mud.

  • Surprisingly, the cops said no foul play.

  • The coroner said Henry had died of asphyxiation.

  • He said that even though it appeared Henry had been hit over the head with something.

  • Was is it Ed who killed Henry?

  • Did Ed want to be the sole benefactor of his mother's adoration?

  • Most people now think yes.

  • Had the cops worked a little bit harder they likely could have prevented the rise of the

  • monster.

  • Not long after Henry's downfall, Augusta suffered a terrible stroke that left her paralyzed.

  • Now Ed had to play nurse for his mother, with her shouting orders as her devoted son ran

  • around doing all the jobs in the house.

  • Nothing Ed could do could save her.

  • She had another stroke soon after and died.

  • To say the least, the adoring son of that bible-waving beast was devastated.

  • The house just got messier and messier, but not in one room.

  • Ed kept his mother's room as clean as possible, making it into a shrine for her.

  • He also boarded up many of the other rooms in the house, with his main room being the

  • kitchen.

  • He still babysat from time to time, but his biggest joy was reading books about Japanese

  • and German atrocities during the second world war.

  • He also had a thing for detective pulp fiction, books back then that often included gory stories

  • of cannibalism in the Pacific.

  • Ed managed to get by doing odd jobs and he also enjoyed a windfall from some land he

  • sold that had once been his brother's.

  • What the locals in the village didn't know at this time was that Ed had lost his head.

  • The death of his mother had traumatized him to the extent he was dangerously psychotic.

  • He had become deranged and there was no going back.

  • We don't know the exact time when Ed started playing around with corpses, but it's thought

  • that during the late forties and early fifties he was gravedigging and killing.

  • He'd sometimes wait until someone had been buried and then he'd sneak off to the graveyard

  • in the middle of the night and exhume the corpse.

  • He's now called a necrophiliac serial killer, which means he gratified himself sexually

  • with the bodies before he got to work on making things from them.

  • Let's now fast-forward in time and tell you about what the cops saw when they entered

  • the property and had the shock of their lives, a shock some people say killed the local sheriff.

  • What he saw that day was so terrible, so unthinkable, he was overwhelmed with feelings of disgust,

  • horror, and sadness.

  • He died soon after from heart failure.

  • It was the deputy sheriff that first arrived on the property.

  • He opened a barn door and before his eyes, he saw a dead woman hanging upside down from

  • a beam.

  • To him, she looked like an animal that had been killed and was in the process of being

  • butchered.

  • She had already been split down the middle and her internal organs had been removed.

  • It was enough to make the cop vomit on the spot.

  • Her head had been removed and the tendons in her ankles had been cut and a rod thread

  • through them.

  • It sure was a sight to behold.

  • Worst still, the police found her head in a burlap bag.

  • Ed had driven a nail in each of her ears and fastened string to them as if to make a kind

  • of hanging trophy.

  • There was much worse to come.

  • The rest of the police department arrived on the scene.

  • Now it was time to check the rooms of the main house.

  • In the kitchen, they discovered Ed had likely been thinking about doing some cooking.

  • On the stove was the heart of a woman, kept next to a bunch of cooking pots.

  • Cops would later say Ed was no doubt a cannibal as well as a necrophile, and what really turned

  • the stomachs of the townsfolks was that they'd often eaten packages of meat Ed had given

  • them.

  • Did that make them cannibals, too?

  • Inside the houses, they found stacks of human bones.

  • They found at least ten severed heads.

  • Some of those heads had had the faces peeled off them.

  • They ended up becoming Ed's face mask collection.

  • To make them more realistic he'd adorned some of their lips with lipstick.

  • One of the cops who saw those masks remarked that the people were very recognizable.

  • One of the faces of a recent victim had only just been removed and Ed had placed that one

  • in a paper bag.

  • The cops weren't anywhere near finished with their search.

  • They found the skin wastebasket we told you about.

  • They found chairs with human skin coverings.

  • There were skulls with the tops sawn off; female genitals stored in a shoebox; they

  • found noses, lips attached to a drawstring, female fingernails, a human skin lampshade,

  • skulls on bedposts, and of course Ed's piece de resistance, his human body suit, replete

  • with the breasts of a woman.

  • So after his arrest, how did Ed explain himself?

  • He admitted that he'd robbed the graves of women.

  • He wanted his mother back and making things from the body parts of women was kind of like

  • having his mother around all of the time.

  • By making a woman suit he could actually become his mother.

  • It turned out that those kids had been right and indeed Ed had kept shrunken heads in his

  • house.

  • One kid, a 16-year-old who sometimes went to see ball games with Ed, said Ed had always

  • told him the heads and faces were all stuff he'd collected that had come from the Philippines.

  • That wasn't true; they were all local women.

  • Cops did wonder how a man could dig up a grave all by himself in just one night, but when

  • they went to the graves of the victims sure enough the women or most of the women were

  • missing from their coffins.

  • Occasionally Ed would take what he needed from the body and later return the body parts

  • he wasn't interested in.

  • So, what led the police to Ed's house in the first place?

  • That was because the police went to a local store and found a trail of blood, the blood

  • of a woman named Bernice Worden.

  • Ed had shot her and slit her throat and then he'd proceeded to drag her body out of the

  • store and take it to his house.

  • Hers was the body hanging from that beam and Ed had literally left a trail of blood for

  • police to follow.

  • The cops also found out from Bernice's son that Ed had been in the store the day before

  • and said he'd come back in a day to buy a gallon of antifreeze.

  • On the floor of the store, the cops found a bloodied receipt for a gallon of antifreeze.

  • Ed didn't immediately admit to this crime, but the cops used a tried and tested technique

  • to get him to confess.

  • It was simple enough.

  • They just made him look at the corpse of the woman he had killed and mutilated and in the

  • end, he cracked.

  • He also admitted to killing a tavern-keeper he knew well, a woman named Mary Hogan.

  • A mask made from her face was found in his house.

  • At first, the cops didn't believe that all those body parts in Ed's house had been

  • robbed from graves.

  • What they thought they had on their hands was one of the most prolific serial killers

  • in U.S. history, but as we said, Ed told them about the graves he'd robbed, and he wasn't

  • lying.

  • He also said he only killed people when the ground was so hard from the cold it made exhuming

  • bodies impossible.

  • He guessed his grave-robbing lasted from 1947 to 1952, and he added that at times he'd

  • been helped by a man named Gus who'd stopped helping Ed when he was forced to live in a

  • home for the elderly.

  • We probably don't need to tell you that the Wisconsin State Crime Lab had never heard

  • a story like this before.

  • At first, Ed was reluctant to open up to investigators, but the longer he was with them the more he

  • talked.

  • They listened as he explained the thing he liked to do the most was put on his tanned

  • skin suit, don one of his face masks, put female sex organs over his male sex organs,

  • and then run around in the garden, especially when it was a full moon.

  • That may sound about as crazy as crazy can get, but with only two murders under his belt,

  • how come Ed Gein is called a serial killer.

  • Isn't it three or more kills that gets a person into the serial killer hall of infamy?

  • Well, it's generally thought Ed killed quite a few more people.

  • Remember he lived in a pretty remote area, and so when we tell you that other people

  • went missing around places where Ed frequented, well, the cops thought he was likely behind

  • those disappearances.

  • Police found the genitals of girls in Ed's house and it's now believed that they belonged

  • to some missing local girls.