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  • If you've ever run to the bathroom after  eating at your local mall's food court,  

  • you've probably spent enough time there to  notice some bizarre things. For instance,  

  • why don't the doors on public bathrooms go  all the way to the floor? It seems like a  

  • place that practically begs for privacy, and  yet there are gaps on top, on the bottom,  

  • and even those small cracks on the side of the  door that would allow anyone positioned just  

  • right to get a good sense of how much fiber  you're eating. Why not just put a door in?

  • Well, for people with such high brow bathroom  musings, we created this video just for you.  

  • Since we're not ones to shy away from the  grosser side of life, we sent our public  

  • bathroom examination squad to discover why it is  that public bathroom doors don't go to the floor,  

  • as well as 25 other insane public bathroom facts.

  • Let's start with the most important  question first. Even though it might  

  • make you feel uncomfortable  when you're inside the stall,  

  • there are actually several practical reasons  why public bathroom doors don't go to the floor.  

  • First off, the visibility is good for keeping the  line moving and for deterring unwanted behavior.  

  • The gap at the bottom of a bathroom stall allows  people to quickly check if a stall is occupied or  

  • not. So instead of the next person who just walked  in knocking on every single bathroom door, a quick  

  • low check will tell them if there's an available  space. Also, the fact that you are partly visible  

  • from the outside serves as a deterrent to gross  or illegal behavior - even though anyone who's  

  • worked at a Starbucks and dealt with unwelcome  bathroom guests is aware this doesn't always work.

  • Doors that don't go to the floor also  make public bathrooms easier to clean,  

  • as power washing the space will be able to  clean inside the stalls as well. Lastly,  

  • the gap exists for safety reasonsSomeone having a medical emergency  

  • or passed out inside will quickly  be identified from the outside;  

  • and if someone gets stuck insidem they can easily  crawl out from underneath as a last resort.

  • However, Americans in the audience might  be surprised to know that this door gap  

  • is almost uniquely a feature of US  toilets.Our next public bathroom  

  • fact is that toilets in Europe tend to havetop to bottom door that fully closes instead.  

  • So cleaning the stalls may take more timebut perhaps the extra privacy is worth it.

  • In fact, there are a few ways in which  toilets across the Atlantic differ, and one  

  • is the sheer amount of water in the bowl. The  reason why US toilets are filled almost to the  

  • brim with water is public bathroom fact #4! US toilets flush differently than European  

  • toilets; they rely on suction rather than  water pushing the waste down. The reliance  

  • on suction means US plumbing that sucks waste  out the toilet's “trap wayhas to be narrower,  

  • and is therefore more prone to blockage, which  means much more water is required in the bowl.

  • Toilets blocking, people relieving  themselves...one of the most frequent complaints  

  • for public bathrooms is that they're disgustingIf you need to go, how do you pick the cleanest  

  • stall? Well, science actually has an answer hereStudies show that the cleanest stall tends to be  

  • the one nearest to the door. Why? People havetendency to skip over the first stall they see  

  • to use ones further in. You might notice yourself  doing this too in public bathrooms. So next time  

  • you're in one, resist your natural instinct  and instead, head straight to the first stall!  

  • We can't promise it will be clean, but it will  probably be the least likely to make you vomit.

  • However, let's say you're not too worried  about how clean the stall is. After all,  

  • you wash your hands thoroughly every time you  use the bathroom. Well, we have some bad news  

  • in the form of fact number 6 almost 25% of soap  found in public bathroom soap containers is  

  • contaminated. In fact, most soap is so bacteria  laden that after conducting a study on it,  

  • microbiology professor Charles P. Gerba saidthere's “so much fecal matter that you're almost  

  • better off washing your hands in the toilet  after you flush it.” How is this possible?  

  • Well, the refillable containers housing  the soap tend to attract a lot of bacteria,  

  • and public bathroom soap is usually over-diluted,  

  • which makes it less resistant to germs and less  effective for sanitizing your hands. A good fact  

  • to keep in mind before you exit the bathroom  to get back to your five-star gourmet dinner.

  • Still, you think to yourself, you barely touch  ANYTHING in the restroom. You're safer than  

  • most. You even insist on using the air-dryer  to avoid touching the paper in the bathroom.  

  • Well, this actually turns out to be  another big public bathroom no-no,  

  • and fact seven. Air-dryers tend to  blow bacteria right off peoples' hands,  

  • and therefore all around the area where they're  installed. A University of Leeds study - yes,  

  • there are an awful lot of scientific  studies on public bathrooms, it turns  

  • out - found that jet dryers have 27 times the  bacteria levels of paper towel dispensers.

  • So what now? How can you possibly protect  yourself from all these germs everywhere?  

  • How many more layers can you possibly put on  the toilet seat to keep yourself protected?  

  • Actually, fact number eight says covering  the toilet seat might be one precaution  

  • you're taking that's..pretty much uselessEven though it sounds disgusting to sit  

  • naked where others have sat, glute to glute  disease transmission isn't really a thing.  

  • There's only one transmissible skin to skin  virus you could fear from public bathrooms,  

  • called CA-MRSA, but there hasn't beenconfirmed bathroom case transmission...ever!

  • You're more likely to come into contact with germs  after flushing, especially if you leave the lid  

  • open. Germs can spray up to six feet in the  air this way! That's why most scientists advise  

  • closing the lid, and if possible, flushing  with your foot. Your hands tend to be the  

  • biggest disease carriers, so avoid touching  them to too many surfaces, and wash them well.

  • And why do women have longer usage times? Any  woman who has impatiently ducked into the mens'  

  • room knows this is always the case. The answer  is a combination of factors. Mens' bathrooms  

  • cram many more available spaces inside thanks  to urinals, while women need to enter a stall.  

  • Women also menstruate, and are usually the ones  to have to accompany children to the bathroom,  

  • all of which take longer. And since  women almost always have to sit down,  

  • while men just stand for #1, covering the toilet  in paper - which we already discussed as kind of  

  • pointless - or using the infamous hover-pee  technique usually takes much more time.

  • The following fact might also play a role in  different wait times for different genders:  

  • only 30% of men, as opposed to 60% of women, wash  their hands properly after using the bathroom.  

  • Ladies, that's not great, but gentlemen, you  definitely [emphasis] need to do a lot better.

  • Women also use more toilet paper than  men, averaging seven square toilet  

  • paper squares per bathroom visit, while men  average two. We actually aren't sure why,  

  • but if your straight relationship is in a rut, you  now have a sad new way to start a conversation.

  • Perhaps there's a small upside in men not washing  hands though, as researchers consistently found  

  • that the dirtiest place in a public bathroom  is almost always...the sink?! Yep, toilet  

  • bowls and lids are actually not nearly as dirty  as the place where you're supposed to wash up.

  • Are you ready to find out where the dirtiest  public bathrooms in the world are? The answer  

  • is simple: airplanes. Airplane bathrooms  rarely get disinfected well between flights,  

  • and one study found E. coli on  the door handles almost 100% of  

  • the time [emphasis]! Now that you know, good  luck holding it from New York to Hong Kong.

  • For some of us, this whole public bathroom  debate is moot, because some people aren't  

  • able to use a public bathroom at all.  17 million Americans have paruresis,  

  • more commonly known asshy bladder”. They can't  use restrooms knowing others are around them, and  

  • they avoid restrooms like the plague. And, one can  only assume, they have the bladders of champions.

  • When you hear a fact like, that after just one  hour of being used, an average public bathroom  

  • has approximately 500,000 bacterial  cells per square inch on its surface,  

  • you might actually be inclined to  develop this shy bladder yourself.  

  • But scientists caution people not to worry  too much. You're carrying an equivalently  

  • ridiculous amount of bacteria on your body  and on your phone already, and most of the  

  • bacteria shed in public bathrooms dies pretty  quickly in the cool, dry atmosphere there.

  • We've listed plenty of the bad - and flat out  disgusting - parts of using public bathrooms,  

  • but there are some ways in which public bathrooms  can be extremely helpful - even save lives! That's  

  • right. Some womens' bathrooms in bars and clubs  have posters with codes women can use, usually  

  • either a fake drink order or asking the bartender  for a specific fake employee, that lets the bar  

  • staff know the woman is either feeling unsafe or  in trouble with a date and needs help. The codes  

  • can mean everything fromescort me to a taxito  “call the policeif the situation is truly dire.

  • Do you know why mens' and womens' toilet  separation came about in the first place?  

  • Contrary to popular belief it's  not because of different male and  

  • female….forgive us for the pun....“plumbing”.  Rather, up until the late 1800s in the US,  

  • womens' bathrooms tended to barely exist in the  public sphere at all, as women were expected to  

  • generally stay at home. However, when women  started going out and about in society and  

  • entering the workforce, they obviously needed  restrooms as well - because yes, women do poop,  

  • as much as your new girlfriend may try to hide  it. Give it a few more months of relationship.

  • So bathrooms were designed using the, at the  time, popularSeparate Spheresphilosophy,  

  • which stated that men and women should have  predefined and strictly separated gender roles,  

  • even extending to the spaces they use. Thereforethe men designing buildings and passing bathroom  

  • code regulations thought that womens' bathrooms  should be kept separately from mens' facilities  

  • so the genders could retain those separate spaces.

  • However, modern public bathrooms seem to pose  a lot of social challenges to men as well.  

  • Thanks to urinals, there are a lot of unwritten  social rules men must follow in the bathroom,  

  • such as picking a urinal far away  from another user if possible,  

  • and not making eye contact with  a fellow bathroom attendee.

  • Because of the public, visible nature of urinalsthis also might explain why men are much more  

  • prone to shy bladders than women are, and are  much more likely to report a phobia of peeing  

  • in public bathrooms. In fact, the amount of  time it takes men to start relieving themselves  

  • directly correlates to how many people are  around them. Scientists conducted a study to  

  • observe this effect - something which probably  didn't help those shy bladders in the first  

  • place - and found that a man alone in a restroom  takes on average 4.9 seconds to start urinating,  

  • while men with a neighbor in the next urinal  take an average of 8.4 seconds to start a stream.

  • Let's switch gears - to a bathroom's  musicality! If you had to guess,  

  • at what pitch would you say your toilet flushesThere is a real answer to this, and it's fact #23.  

  • Scientists with too much time on their hands have  determined that toilets flush in E flat. So if any  

  • of you decide to use your bathroom time to tune up  your guitar, you have that point of reference now.

  • You might scoff that people would engage in  prolonged activities in a public bathroom,  

  • but studies show that 75% of people in public  bathrooms report using their phones. And not  

  • just to swipe through Instagram and Tinder; many  people will actually make calls in the bathroom.  

  • Good thought to keep in mind next time you  call your friend or co-worker and they sound  

  • strained. It might, really  honestly, not be about you.

  • However, this unfortunate habit means that  phones are about ten times dirtier than your  

  • average toilet seat. So why are you sitting  here worrying about a public bathroom? Go wipe  

  • down your iPhone! Or Android, if you're THAT  green bubble texter in your group of friends.

  • Our final public bathroom fact explains one of  those annoying smaller mysteries of the universe.  

  • When bathrooms have two-roll dispensersthey tend to run out at the same time.  

  • Why? Well, because the world seems to be pretty  evenly divided between what scientists term  

  • big-choosers and little-choosersBig-choosers will choose the bigger,  

  • fuller roll of toilet paper, and little choosers  will go with the underdog - AKA the scrawnier  

  • roll. Meaning at the end, both rolls tend  to balance out and finish at the same time.

  • Now that we've reached this note of harmony and  the end of our insane public bathroom facts,  

  • are you ready to learn a whole lot more about the  world, outside its bathrooms? For more fun facts,  

  • click on this video right here, or this video  instead! And if you have to take a break  

  • before the next video to use the bathroomwe're begging you: please wash your hands!

If you've ever run to the bathroom after  eating at your local mall's food court,  

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Why Public Bathroom Doors Don’t Go To The Floor

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    林宜悉 posted on 2020/12/19
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