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  • It's something I try to do around here.

  • What we just we call them thought experiments where I say what happened?

  • Yeah, experience where I just posted someone.

  • I said, What happens if we, uh, stopped doing shows and people like, stop doing shows that we do show every week That's we've done for nine years?

  • But what if we didn't?

  • Then what would we do is a brand and everyone freaks out.

  • I'm like, just meditate on.

  • I use that term.

  • One of my mentors said, I'll meditate on that.

  • He's not a meditator, but he said that term, and it's it's what you cover in the book, John.

  • It's like that means give your unconscious brain a few days to process it and get Get that that that whatever the left side of the frontal cortex out of the way because it's gonna make everything logical.

  • Let's do a spreadsheet, pros and cons.

  • But the greatest bit of research ever done showed that the creative creative people could play.

  • It was only difference.

  • Well, there was one other minor one, but that was the key.

  • Could they play?

  • Could they just sit back and think being played not in an anxious going to solve.

  • This one got away.

  • But what about it?

  • This or what?

  • Why did I think of the rhinoceros and all that play for quality?

  • That's what gets you off this path to the shed.

  • And you must have done a lot of that in Cambridge in that improv troupe is playing.

  • No, I never did improve.

  • No.

  • Okay, so you were just coming up with ideas and creating pieces.

  • It was writing I was writing.

  • Then laterally.

  • I was writing with Graham Chapman.

  • We got together in my second year, but we were just play and sometimes we just opened up a book and I would read words.

  • Uh, I'd say cucumber.

  • And they say MM doesn't do much for me, is that I don't think so.

  • And then I said, Alright, Plummet!

  • He said.

  • Oh, he said, I like plummet.

  • That's a funny word.

  • Plummet.

  • You know Andi, I said, Yeah, yeah, I like that.

  • What would What would What would plummet when he said a sheep e she He said the sheep would plummet if it tried to fly.

  • E Why why isn't she trying to fly on?

  • He said.

  • Well, because Otherwise, he knows he's going to finish up next to the bin source.

  • And it was It's that random quality, which is where stuff comes through the unconscious.

  • Because no matter how good your logical mind is, you can't be creative.

  • You could make tiny improvements, but you'll never come up with anything new anything.

  • There's a bit of a break for anything.

  • That's a new way of looking at things that doesn't come from the logical mind that comes up from the unconscious.

  • And if you're if it sounds a bit with Willie, read a book called Hair Brain Toward Us.

  • Mine Toward Us.

  • Slow My and this guy Guy Claxton, who wrote it, has spoken a lot about or written a lot about Nobel Prize winning physicist, and everything they do is exactly what I'm talking about.

  • Albert Einstein once said that when he was thinking he could not put into words what it was that he was thinking, If somebody said to you, what are you thinking right now?

  • He would say, I don't know.

  • Yeah.

  • Einstein admits that he didn't know what his mental processes are.

  • That's pretty powerful evidence.

  • And Edison, who usedto has more pay patterns than anyone in history.

  • He used to sit in a non armchair because he thought he had more ideas when he was drowsy.

  • That when he was up on alert on, he'd have, ah, handful of, uh, what do you call a little little metal balls?

  • Uh, okay, Barry on.

  • He'd have, ah, metal plate below.

  • And he sit there in the very drowsy state just dreaming and play.

  • If he went to sleep, his hand would relax on the ball bearings would drop on the plate, make a bit of noise, and it would wake him up and pick the ball bearings up and go back into the Drowsy State again.

  • If he had more patterns than anyone else in history.

  • It wasn't because it was clear, logical thinking, Right, right.

  • This is neuroscience really here?

  • Yes, it is.

  • That's neuroscience.

  • It is.

  • And it's This is Donald Hobbs, the Canadian who talked about neurons fire together.

  • They were together.

  • It's all about how to get off that wire, that path into new areas.

  • And you can only do that if you're not under pressure.

  • In other words, if you're playing because kids can play and of course.

  • Another reason kids can play is that the parents of minding the shop.

  • So what I'm saying is that you could go back to playing if you can create the childlike condition, childlike condition, which is no interruptions.

  • So you have to close the door or go and sit in the park a long way away from anywhere and for very specific period of time.

  • Like when a play like that football referee blows the whistle, you start, he blows the whistle.

  • You finished for that period.

  • Maybe about an hour and a quarter.

  • You just forget everything on.

  • Of course, the first thing that happens is you.

  • You sit down and write, Let's be create.

  • All should have called Bob forgot to buy a present for the hamster, this kind of stuff, and you have to sit there meditating, just like you would say, until the mind just gets a little bit quieter and all those shouldn't be doing this should be doing that.

  • Thoughts go away, and then you can start to play, because at the moment when on our own, a quarter is up on your watchable watch and clock whatever it goes pp pp PP go back to real life.

  • But until then, you're away from real life because you can't play.

  • If you're in the middle of my my what were some?

  • Why don't you want Stop my wife?

  • Uh huh.

It's something I try to do around here.

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A2 logical drowsy play pp sit unconscious

KILLING CREATIVITY: Why Clear & Logical Thinking Kills The Creativity Process - John Cleese

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    林宜悉 posted on 2020/11/25
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