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  • It's one of the most hotly debated ethical questions of all time: Does The State ever

  • really have the authority to take a life?

  • That's rightCapital Punishment, aka The Death Penalty.

  • It's one of the least fun subjects to discuss, but that doesn't mean it can't be fascinating,

  • and that's what this video is all about.

  • You may think that you know all there is to know about death row, but we're going to

  • prove you wrong with 50 insane, shocking facts about execution and the death penalty.

  • Buckle upit's going to get grim and gruesome.

  • 50.

  • The death penalty is basically as old as written law itself.

  • The first recorded instance of the written death penalty occurred in the 18th Century

  • BC with the Code of King Hammurabi in Ancient Babylon.

  • It assigned the death penalty to 25 different crimes.

  • 49.

  • US Capital punishment was a British import, and was essentially instated immediately after

  • the British invasion of North America.

  • The first man to be executed on US soil was Captain George Kendall in 1608, who was sentenced

  • to death for being a spy for Spain.

  • 48.

  • While Britain got the US started on Capital Punishment, it was actually outlawed in England

  • in 1965.

  • The last two people executed in England were Gwynne Evans and Peter Allen, who were both

  • hanged the year before for murdering a friend for money.

  • 47.

  • The Death Penalty is still legal in 56 countries.

  • The world's top executors are: China, Iran, Saudi Arabia, Iraq, Pakistan, Egypt, Somalia,

  • the US, Jordan, and Singapore.

  • 46.

  • 25 US States still have the Death Penalty, though its usage isn't that frequent.

  • 18 of these 25 states haven't executed any inmates in the past five years, and twelve

  • of these states haven't executed anyone in twelve years.

  • 45.

  • The most popular method of execution in the modern United States is the lethal injection.

  • It's a procedure that's been frequently marred by controversy, as it isn't performed

  • by trained medical professionals due to its breach of the Hippocratic Oath.

  • This has led to a number of infamous botched executions.

  • 44.

  • The youngest person to be executed in modern history is George Stinney, a 14-year-old African

  • American boy from the state of South Carolina who was sentenced to die by the electric chair

  • in 1944.

  • A full 70 years later in 2014, a judge finally threw out the conviction and declared the

  • previous trial to have been in violation of Stinney's constitutional rights.

  • Sadly, this was much too little and far too late to save his life.

  • 43.

  • The oldest person to be executed in modern history is Walter Moody, an 83-year-old convict

  • in Alabama sentenced to die by the lethal injection in 1991.

  • His actual execution finally took place in 2018.

  • 42.

  • While Walter Moody's time on death row was definitely excessive, but not by all that

  • much.

  • The average wait on death row for a US convict is around 15 years.

  • 41.

  • The US has executed over 1,500 death row inmates since 1976.

  • While a great number of these prisoners were likely guilty of their crimes, there's also

  • a possibilityaccording to some claimsthat around 4.1 % of those executed were

  • actually innocent, some of which have been officially exonerated by DNA evidence.

  • We sadly may never know the true number of innocent deaths.

  • 40.

  • The world's leading proponent of execution is China, believed to have executed somewhere

  • within the ballpark of 1,000 people annually, according to Amnesty International.

  • The true numbers are a little difficult to discern due to China's extremely secretive

  • nature.

  • 39.

  • China also has the dubious honour of being one of the world's leading execution innovators.

  • According to anti-execution and torture charity Reprieve.org, China has taken to using mobile

  • death vans”, where prisoners are strapped to electrical stretchers in the back of the

  • van before being injected with deadly chemicals.

  • The victim's organs are harvested for transplant after death.

  • 38.

  • Execution doesn't just apply to humans.

  • In 1916, an elephant named Mary was executed via hanging after killing her trainer.

  • 37.

  • But actual countries often aren't much better.

  • As late as 2013, stoning women to death was still completely legal in 15 countriesincluding

  • Iran, Qatar, Sudan, and Saudi Arabia.

  • 36.

  • In the US, the Death Penalty is extremely costly.

  • In Washington, trials that seek the death penalty tend to cost around a million dollars

  • more than the non-lethal alternative.

  • The death penalty has also cost California over four billion dollars since the late 1970s.

  • 35.

  • Death row inmates are typically granted a last meal request by the state, and these

  • can be pretty strange.

  • Murderer Victor Feguer requested a single olive with the pit still in it, and bomber

  • Timothy McVeigh requested two pints of mint chocolate chip ice cream.

  • 34.

  • The price cap for last meals in Oklahoma is fifteen dollars, so if you plan on having

  • anything extravagant before you meet your maker, don't commit a crime in Oklahoma.

  • Texas stopped offering last meals entirely in 2011.

  • 33.

  • The turn of the millennium was a bad time to be a death row inmate.

  • The number of annual executions in the US peaked after a steady decline in 1999, with

  • the execution of 98 criminals by the end of the year.

  • 32.

  • Uzbekistan has executed criminals by boiling them to death as late as 2002, so if you ever

  • visit, make sure you're on your best behaviour.

  • 31.

  • Two people executed in the United States between the dates of 1608 and 2002 had the stated

  • occupation ofplayboy.”

  • 30.

  • The most common occupation of people executed in the US in the last 400 years wasslave”,

  • accounting for 11.5 of all people executed in that time frame.

  • 29.

  • The US has historically executed 15 people for the crimes ofsodomy, buggery, or bestiality.”

  • We won't go into any more detail on that one.

  • 28.

  • There's a racial element to execution.

  • According to a 2003 study from Amnesty International, despite white and black murderers being relatively

  • equal in conviction, 80% of killers sentenced to death are black.

  • 20% of these convicts were also convicted by all-white juries.

  • 27.

  • Executions were public in the US all the way up until 1936, and were often considered a

  • family affair.

  • Now, we have horror and action movies instead.

  • 26.

  • It was only in 2005 that the US Supreme Court officially declared it unconstitutional to

  • sentence juvenile criminals to death.

  • 25.

  • Perhaps the most terrifying last words spoken by a death row inmate were that of vicious

  • serial killer and rapist Carl Panzram.

  • While he was preparing to be hanged, the wait time was beginning to frustrate him.

  • He yelled, “Hurry it up, you Hoosier b*stard!

  • I could hang a dozen men while you're screwing around!”

  • 24.

  • Conversely, the funniest last words spoken by a Death Row inmate could probably be attributed

  • to criminal James D. French.

  • Before his execution on the electric chair, he supposedly said, "How's this for a headline?

  • 'French Fries.'"

  • 23.

  • Hanging, Drawing, and Quartering is a famously horrific method of execution used on criminals

  • like British Houses of Parliament Bomber Guy Fawkes.

  • It was declared cruel and unusual punishment, and thus unconstitutional, by the US Supreme

  • Court in 1878.

  • 22.

  • Iwao Hakamada from Japan was the world's longest-serving death row inmate, spending

  • 45 years awaiting execution.

  • However, Hakamada was freed after a judge threw out his initial conviction on the grounds

  • of faulty evidence.

  • He's either very lucky or very unlucky, depending on your perspective.

  • 21.

  • Actually being executed is a highly unlikely outcome of being sentenced to death, with

  • only 13% ever making it there.

  • The rest either have their convictions overturned, or die by other means, like suicide or natural

  • causes.

  • 20.

  • While it was cancelled in 2012, China has such a large volume of executions that they

  • were able to host a successful TV talk show that interviews death row inmates and gets

  • their final thoughts before their execution.

  • 19.

  • One of the most prolific executioners of the modern era was English pub-owner and professional

  • hangman Albert Pierrepoint, who pulled the lever on between 435 and 600 people during

  • his 25-year-career in the mid-20th century.

  • 18.

  • The most prolific ancient executioner is believed to be Souflikar, Royal Gardener and executioner

  • for Mahomet IV of the Ottoman Empire.

  • He's believed to have killed upwards of a thousand people with his bare hands on behalf

  • of his country.

  • 17.

  • One of history's most brutal methods of execution was Ling Chi, aka death by a thousand

  • cuts.

  • The victim is slowly mutilated with a knife before a final killing blow is struck against

  • the head or heart.

  • It was only banned in China in 1905.

  • 16.

  • Another brutal form of historical execution is impalement, favoured by rulers like Vlad

  • of Wallachia.

  • It involved forcing a large wooden stake up the anus of a convicted prisoner until the

  • stake displaces their organs and kills them.

  • 15.

  • In Saudi Arabia, the ancient Roman execution method of crucifixion is still very much on

  • the table.

  • Convicts are crucified, beheaded, and left on display as an example to others.

  • 14.

  • The only country in Europe to continue performing executions in the 21st century is Belarus

  • in Eastern Europe, whose last execution was performed in 2019.

  • 13.

  • The most infamous woman executed in the US was serial killer Aileen Wuornos, one of the

  • few female serial killers who didn't use poison.

  • Poison, however, was used to kill her, via the lethal injection, in 2002.

  • 12.

  • The lethal injection is typically a cocktail of three drugs: Midazolam, which sedates the

  • victim, Vercuronium Bromide, which paralyses the victim's muscles, and finally Potassium

  • Chloride, which stops the heart.

  • 11.

  • The infamous electric chair was invented over the course of nine years by a dentist named

  • Alfred Southwick, as a more humane way to execute prisoners.

  • 10.

  • However, the first person executed by an electric chair was William Kemmler.

  • There were plenty of kinks in the system, and the electric chair essentially brutally

  • burned Kemmler to death over a torturous eight minutes.

  • 9.

  • Hanging, one of the most popular methods of execution over history that still sees use

  • today, actually involves pretty exact mathematics.

  • The length of the rope must be judged in proportion to the weight of the victimtoo short,

  • and the victim will be strangled rather than having their neck snapped.

  • Too long, and the victim's velocity will build during the fall, and cause a messy decapitation.

  • 8.

  • While the American South has the highest rate of executions in the United States, the region

  • actually has some of the largest crime figures, toosuggesting that the death penalty

  • may not actually work as the deterrent it's often touted as.

  • 7.

  • Executions became less frequent in the early US as states became wealthier and were able

  • to build larger prisons.

  • This indicates that the death penalty was a largely practical measure to save space

  • in overcrowded prisons.

  • 6.

  • In Iran, homosexuality is still punishable by death.

  • One of the most frequently applied methods of execution for this is forcing the convict

  • to jump to their death from a high platform, such as a crane.

  • 5.

  • One of the reasons behind China's incredibly high rates of execution is the huge number

  • of crimes that carry the death penalty.

  • These include Arson, prostitution, and even tax fraud.

  • 4.

  • Singapore takes a similar zero-tolerance attitude to drug offences, such as selling and trafficking.

  • Since 2010, Singapore has executed over thirty people for drug-related offences.

  • 3.

  • The pre-Victorian era in Britain also executed people for some pretty weird and stupid reasons,

  • includingevidence of malice within a childandwriting a threatening letter.”

  • Jephthah Big was executed for this reason in 1729.

  • In 1810, there were 222 crimes punishable by death in England.

  • 2.

  • The modern US has sentenced a total of 8,440 inmates to death between 1977 and 2017.

  • That works out to around 2110 death sentences per decade, though the yearly number has thankfully

  • been on a steady decline since 1994.

  • 1.

  • A Gallup poll from 2019 was one of the first ever to show that Americans slightly favour

  • life sentences over the death penalty, indicating that an abolishment of capital punishment

  • may be possible sometime in the foreseeable future.

  • There's plenty of death row inmates out there who think this day can't come soon

  • enough.

  • Now check outThe Horrible History of The Death PenaltyandWhat Does The Last

  • 24 Hours of a Death Row Prisoner Look Like in 2019.”

It's one of the most hotly debated ethical questions of all time: Does The State ever

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50 Insane Execution and Death Penalty Facts That Will Shock You

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    林宜悉 posted on 2020/11/23
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