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  • and you grew up in France.

  • I grew up in front.

  • What kind of what kind of childhood like when were you in the in the in the rural areas, Where you in the countryside where I was in the city.

  • And then I became a boy scout and starting to go, you know, a bit outside, discovering the nature.

  • Okay, I'm in.

  • Cleaves and climbers are a weird bunch of guys, right?

  • I mean, climbers e mean, you kind of do your own thing.

  • It's usually not the most social thing, right?

  • Europe on a rock.

  • And I mean, you kind of tune out of society somewhat climber.

  • Yes.

  • Well, maybe yes, a long time ago.

  • I was like that.

  • But you know, now I'm like, close to 58.

  • And I am exactly the opposite.

  • You know, I'm socializing with people.

  • I you know, I do find interest in many things.

  • I can be just a guy going on the beach six o'clock in the morning in valley just, you know, looking at the waves and just, you know, being amazed by by my surrounding.

  • Finally, I can say I am seeing the world the way it is which, when I was young, I was far too focused on climbing on, training on, on being good, doing this doing that.

  • And then there's so many things that I didn't see.

  • Unfortunately for me, as I'm still in a good health, I can still see a lot of things that I didn't manage to see before.

  • Yeah, all right.

  • I want to go back to Chicago really quick because I lived in Chicago for two years in the nineties.

  • I don't know when.

  • When did you climb Serious Tower in 1999?

  • 99?

  • Okay, I lived there about 1995 and I went up to the top of the Sears Tower deck.

  • First of all, it's windy in Chicago.

  • It's cold, and the Sears Tower is the scariest building.

  • I was up in the observation deck, maybe 106th floor 103rd floor.

  • I mean, it's a scary building, you know?

  • It's it's massive.

  • And you went to climate.

  • And you you at a point where you said I'm dead, right?

  • I mean, yeah, well, especially, you know, on that day when I climbed it, Why'd you climate?

  • Because?

  • Because it was there and I had to do it.

  • It's like mountains, you know, There there is Ah, I heard a long time ago.

  • And because people they keep on questioning, why why Why are you climbing?

  • And just because there is a mountain on for me, for me, the Sears was like, uh, like a mountain of glass and steel on.

  • It was so obvious that it was an amazing target.

  • Was it the tallest building in the world at the time?

  • At that time, it was yes, right, OK.

  • And you had done your first building on Lee about four years earlier in 95 also in Chicago.

  • I also in Chicago at that time I saw the Sears and I just thought, fact, this building is totally impossible.

  • It's Carrie, actually, I went to the other three deck.

  • I was looking down, although I was used to it.

  • You know, I had climbed a lot mountains, you know, with, like, 1000 m cliffs.

  • But, you know, building is different because you're having a reference point.

  • You can see the scale because down the road you can see the car Onda car in your mind, it means something.

  • If you're climbing Ah, Big mountain.

  • You're not seeing such a thing.

  • So at one point you get trust.

  • You don't know whether you are 500 m above the ground 1000 or 2000 because you're kind of lost.

  • But on the building you are perfectly knowing where you are because there's cars on the ground and it's so straight.

  • Let's see all the details.

  • Definitely it is carrying Okay.

  • I love that scariness because I I just knew that Wow, I'm gonna do that.

  • You know, the morning I was about to do it, I was even crying because I knew that most likely I was living my last few hours.

  • Wow, I was crying, but I was I have decided.

  • No way.

  • I am not moving backwards.

  • I'll do it.

  • How do you deal with the emotions?

  • Say 24 hours before?

  • What's happening is Are you going up?

  • Are you going down through the tears are the tears of there were tears of joy like Yeah, actually, it's like waves, meaning there is moment which you are not doubting about yourselves.

  • And there is moments which you are like pretty much down and then it's kind of difficult overall, I have always known that once I am into action, all of that I put it aside.

  • I am focused on the tiger is fighting and I make it.

  • I make it.

  • I don't make it.

  • It's not such a big issue.

  • Actually, you know, I've been living such an amazing life.

  • I have crossed more than four decades free soloing.

  • I still don't even know why I'm still alive, actually, because I fell a few times.

  • You know, doctors.

  • He said, uh, your 1982 that physically talking.

  • I was not going to be able to climb back.

  • You fell in 82?

  • Yeah.

  • This is 13 years before you climbed a major skyscraper in Chicago.

  • Even the cliffs, Because a lot people are not knowing that I did amazing Cliff Free solo Super high difficulties.

  • Yeah, they called like 5.

  • 35.

  • 13 d d d.

  • Accept that.

  • You know, when I became idiotic, the journalists said, We don't care about cliffs on now that Alex Honnold with my friend has climbed capital.

  • Then it's like fuck what I did 30 years ago.

  • It's my fucking legacy, Andi people, they start talking.

  • But even even Alex Alex.

  • He said it.

  • You know, I am having transcript.

  • You did a very nice interview for my next documentary is going to be released and off March and what he said.

  • He said what this guy did 30 years ago is mind blowing because his margin in between what it could do with rope and what he did without was nearly the same.

  • He said.

  • Look, I climbed the free rider, but my highest level with the safety Waas 45 grades above Free Rider, this guy, it was climbing at his utter limit with and without safety.

  • So he was giving.

  • He was giving you props by saying you were one of the best original free solo climbers except that the journalist nowadays they don't give a damn because I got hurt when I read some stuff because I'm just not only a guy with climbing fucking buildings.

  • I did climb cliffs for 20 years on a daily basis, free swallowing art stuff five for in a B, C and D, which nobody has ever climbed that level of difficulties on then, when suddenly I was like, completely ignored.

  • Like people writing Oh is climbing easy building you know, movements are quite repetitive and bullshit, you know, First of all, I climbed some very hard buildings like the Sears, Like the Framatome in Paris.

  • Lady Franz.

  • Like the Blue Cross in Philadelphia.

  • Like the Petronas in Kuala Lumpur.

  • So not all of the buildings.

  • First of all, they are repetitive.

  • So it's just like people that are writing bullshit.

  • There are totally non informed on it is really hurting my my worship.

  • Why don't you want stop my wife?

and you grew up in France.

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A2 climbed sears climbing chicago building climb

THIS IS MY LEGACY: Why I Will Continue To Climb & How I Deal With My Emotions - Alain Robert

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    Summer posted on 2020/11/18
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