Placeholder Image

Subtitles section Play video

  • a man dressed in a smart suit walks into a hotel cigar lounge, where, upon a guy at the other side of the bar emotions to him with a sly movement of his hand.

  • The requisite security question is asked in a hushed voice.

  • Why can't the pirate play poker?

  • To which the other guy confirms he's the right person?

  • By replying, he sat on the deck.

  • These two extremely shady characters then get down to talking about the sale of enriched uranium that could be used as an ingredient to make nuclear weapons in the movies.

  • This never quite works out for the criminals.

  • There's always some goody two shoes special agent that gets in the way who at the very last minute saves the world from total destruction.

  • Here at the Infographic show, we have inquisitive minds, and what we want to know is, why don't those sketchy characters just go right to the source?

  • What's the point in all that trafficking business when there are stockpiles of bombs to steal?

  • Better yet, wouldn't it just be possible to blow up a nuclear site?

  • Let's now investigate.

  • Okay, so first you need to know some information about the U.

  • S s nuke sites.

  • In all, the country has 6185 nuclear warheads, 2385 of them have already hit retirement age, and a further 3800 or stockpiled 1365 are good to go in case any of the other eight new carrying countries decides to ruin things here on Earth.

  • By good to go, we mean they're deployed on either intercontinental ballistic missiles, submarine launched ballistic missiles or strategic bombers.

  • That's, Ah, lot of bombs.

  • And he might wonder if the U.

  • S would notice if one went missing.

  • You can just imagine the results of an inventory when some guy reports that on the last count there were 6000, 184 warheads, Huh?

  • Looks like we might have lost one, says the boss.

  • Count again.

  • We don't need to tell you that that's not a plausible scenario.

  • But the U.

  • S.

  • Does take looking after the warheads very, very seriously.

  • You can go to government websites and read about various special protections, protections that are so important because of the bombs, destructive power or because someone could deliberately pre arm them or, God forbid, detonate or launch them.

  • The Department of Defense also states that one can't be too careful in regard, toe lost, theft or sabotage.

  • The government has good reason to be worried, but will come back to this matter soon.

  • Just to make some of you feel concerned, we'll tell you where the nukes air store.

  • Hey, you can find this information online.

  • We're not giving out secrets to evil people.

  • The largest of the main 10 sites in the U.

  • S is located at Naval Base Kids up in the kits of Peninsula in Washington state.

  • There you'll find 2364 bombs.

  • That's a lot.

  • So of course, you'd expect nothing less than world class security measures, enough to keep someone like a James Bond villain out, or at least a pensioner with fragile hips and ailing eyesight.

  • That's why it was surprising when, in 2009, 5 protesters and an 82 year old priest named William J.

  • Bischel, SJ cut their way through a couple of fences and got very close to a bunker where two nuclear warheads were stored.

  • Maybe security has been bolstered since then.

  • Let's hope so.

  • the second largest site is at Kirtland Air Force Base in Albuquerque, New Mexico.

  • There you'll find 1914 bombs.

  • Most of them are inactive or in reserve, waiting to be taken to a massive plant in Amarillo, Texas.

  • That's where the dismantling happens.

  • Just because the bombs are inactive doesn't mean that they aren't dangerous or couldn't be of use to the kind of faceless man that strokes a cat while planning the annihilation of the human species.

  • These bombs have plutonium course, of course, that could cause megatons of nuclear explosions.

  • If you work at that plant in Texas, you have a dangerous job.

  • The media has talked a lot about the fact that there is too much plutonium around and someone could get their hands on it.

  • One guy said this.

  • We're in a much more dangerous situation today than we were in the Cold War.

  • The same article where we found that quote also told us that very bad people would only require £11 or less of plutonium to make a bomb.

  • This is why, once the plutonium is removed, it's made unusable for bombs and either used for fuel for reactors or stored in casks.

  • That's if it's not stolen first.

  • Now you're sufficiently frightened.

  • Let's move on.

  • You'll find more warheads stored at Barksdale Air Force Base in Louisiana.

  • Francis E.

  • Warren Air Force Base in Colorado and Wyoming Kings Bay Submarine Base in Camden County, Georgia.

  • Malmstrom Air Force Base in Cascade County, Montana.

  • Nellis Air Force Base in Nevada might not Air Force Base in North Dakota and Whiteman Air Force Base in Missouri.

  • There are also research and development facilities, but we won't include those today.

  • If the Betty's don't want to risk stealing bombs or parts of bombs in the US, they could always opt for traveling to Germany, Turkey, the Netherlands, Belgium or Italy, where US nukes also reside.

  • Okay, so back to stealing the bombs or losing the bombs or someone detonating the bombs.

  • The Department of Defense says in this regard that public safety is paramount.

  • It says all facilities here have advanced security systems, including surveillance technology, physical security procedures and armed forces.

  • It doesn't matter what cycle the bombs air in, whether deployed, stocked or being dismantled.

  • Security is always strict, sometimes not strict enough, as you'll find out the D O.

  • D.

  • Does actually acknowledge threats and says that if such a threat appears on the radar in that particular facility will introduce corresponding security measures.

  • Even when there isn't a threat, the only people that can have access to weapons have to be authorized.

  • If you don't have a high security clearance, you must be screened in what's called a personnel reliability program.

  • Even then, there's a two person rule, meaning you have to be with at least one other person to gain access to the bomb.

  • If one person starts doing sketchy things with the bomb, the other person has to be educated enough to know what's going down.

  • If you want an idea of what the formal rules sound like, here's a snippet to authorized personnel shall be physically positioned where they can detect incorrect or unauthorized procedures with respect to the task or operation being performed.

  • Not only that, there are zones that people have to go through to get closer to the bomb or bombs.

  • There's a perimeter security system and inner area, a limited zone and an exclusion zone.

  • If someone dodgy looking is hanging around, they'll soon be weighed up as a potential adversary if the security system picks them up, which it should.

  • It considers these steps deterrence, detection, delay and denial.

  • What will happen next if the threat is validated, is automatic systems and or personnel will nullify or repulse or terminate the threat.

  • Okay, so we know that breaking into a facility ain't easy at all.

  • We guess that the old priest only got so far and then was repulsed.

  • It's kind of nice that he didn't get terminated, which is likely only a little bit better than being nullified.

  • Let's stay with the priest.

  • This is an important part of the story and should make you all feel ill at ease, to say the least.

  • After he got out of prison for his first break in, he did the same again at a facility called the Y 12 national security complex.

  • This place, based in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, produces major bits of nuclear weapons and stocks massive amounts of enriched uranium.

  • A year later, an 82 year old nun named Meghan Rice broke into the same facility and spray painted a storage structure containing weapons grade uranium.

  • Make love, not war, was the sentiment of her graffiti at her ripe old age.

  • She got through the fence, is past security sensors and was in the protected area for hours before she was repulsed by one single guard.

  • The facility was later blamed for it's troubling displays of ineptitude.

  • What's even worse was that this place is nicknamed the Fort Knox of uranium.

  • It turned out to be about as secure as a tennis club at the time.

  • The age none did.

  • Her Ocean's 11 act.

  • It was protected by four perimeter fences, five state of the art armored vehicles, fast firing Gatlin guns, motion detectors, video cameras and 500 security personnel who had the authorization toe light up anyone who was found in the protected areas.

  • The nun, along with some friends from the Scarborough Church of Christ, first scoped the joint using Google Earth.

  • Then they white boarded an infiltration plan, and we're good to go.

  • Once in the facility, they found a wall and painted the words Woe to the empire of blood.

  • When they were finally spotted, they were huddled in a group singing this little light of mine.

  • The guard was more than a little shocked, but on quickly realizing he wasn't dealing with Dr Evil.

  • He got on the radio and said, It appears we have intruders in the protected area.

  • He didn't terminate them, although they all ended up in prison.

  • This might be troubling to many of our viewers, and it should be.

  • But the truth is that fences or exterior security is only one part of the onion layer of security measures meant to protect nuclear weapons or material.

  • Those bunkers are called bunkers for a reason.

  • They're almost impossible to blast through from anywhere.

  • But the door and endorse themselves are several inches thick in solid steel sunk into the floor and thus need to be jacked up in order to be open and are often protected by a stack of three several £1000 blocks of solid concrete, which need a forklift to be moved while a fence line could be easily penetrated, as has been shown, the reality is that someone wanting to actually access a nuclear weapon or nuclear materials would need to bring a lot of explosives to get through all those physical barriers and would then have to deal with the 30 plus Man Response Force and 60 plus augmentation Force that would come running in response to the threat.

  • Sure, you can cut through a fence and get inside the grounds of a nuclear facility, but good luck getting into the actual storage bunkers.

  • Well, with that in mind, now it's time to ask if anyone has successfully gotten into a facility and taken away material that could cause a lot of havoc.

  • We'll start with the good news.

  • So far, there have been no reports of anyone stealing Category one special nuclear material from the facility.

  • That's basically special strategic nuclear material that could be used to make a nuclear weapon.

  • The bad news is that there have been a reported 18 cases of highly enriched uranium and plutonium being stolen around the world.

  • But from what we can see, the material didn't go missing from any place we've mentioned so far in this video.

  • Most of these thefts have actually been in Russia, which after the fall of the Soviet Union, had such atrocious security in place that the United States for years sent money in personnel to help Russia security facilities.

  • It's thought that if someone were to get close to the weapons, it's unlikely they wouldn't try to hold the place for ransom or even steal a warhead.

  • They'd more likely make what's called a dirty bomb.

  • This is a device that spreads radioactive material over a large space.

  • To make one.

  • All someone would need is some conventional explosives and the radioactive material found on the site.

  • Once detonated, it wouldn't cause a huge explosion, but it would make people in the vicinity sick and caused billions of dollars worth of damage.

  • That's why living near a facility could spoil your day.

  • And it's also a reason why you don't want your facility to be vulnerable to folks.

  • In their eighties, they might have been activists only wanting to spread a message.

  • But there are far worse people in the world.

  • So what's the biggest threat?

  • Even though we've established that unseasoned criminals can breach facilities, there's probably more to worry about.

  • Here's a scary story.

  • In 2016, a 60 ton Trident two d five missile was tested by the U.

  • K.

  • These things are capable of carrying 8 100 kiloton nuclear warheads.

  • The missile was fired from a submarine.

  • It thrust through the water, and when it was ready, it's rockets fired and it went on its journey and almost five times the speed of sound around 13,600 MPH.

  • It was launched from the H.

  • M s vengeance that was underwater somewhere off the coast of Florida.

  • The missiles route was supposed to take it somewhere off the coast of Africa.

  • That never happened.

  • It instead flew at an incredibly high rate of speed in the direction of Mainland USA.

  • This was something of a shock to the British.

  • And even though the missile didn't have any nuclear warheads on it at the time, firing a Trident missile at your best friend is what the Brits might call a poor show.

  • The good thing was that once the missile realized it was not going in the intended direction, it self destructive.

  • You won't have heard about it at the time because the misfire wasn't made public knowledge.

  • It later became a bit of a scandal.

  • In a way, the launch proved to be something of a success because the self destruction mode worked.

  • The British government even turned the disaster on its side and reported that the launch was successful.

  • It proved that even if someone ever managed a hack a missile, it would give up the ghost rather than travel down the wrong path.

  • What's worrying, though, is the fact that it went the wrong way.

  • It's also a major concern these days that weapons systems could be hacked and there's the matter of misinformation.

  • Maybe someone could hack a military computer and make the generals think they were under attack, and so they naturally counterattack.

  • In that case, a nuclear war happens because a very intelligent troll sense of fake news.

  • It's not beyond the realms of possibility rather than break into a nuclear facility.

  • What's more, a cause for concern is what happens when someone exploits a vulnerability in the technology.

  • Now you really need to watch this.

  • How to survive a nuclear explosion or 50 facts about nuclear weapons.

a man dressed in a smart suit walks into a hotel cigar lounge, where, upon a guy at the other side of the bar emotions to him with a sly movement of his hand.

Subtitles and vocabulary

Operation of videos Adjust the video here to display the subtitles

B1 nuclear security facility force base air force plutonium

How Does USA Protect Its Nuke Sites?

  • 0 1
    林宜悉 posted on 2020/11/13
Video vocabulary