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  • The health secretary, Matt Hancock, says the NHS should be ready to roll out a coronavirus vaccine by the start of December if it's approved.

  • But he urged caution, warning that it would be an enormous logistical task on it wasn't clear how many people would have to be vaccinated in order for life to return to some sort of normality.

  • If regulators decide that it is safe and effective, the vaccine will be offered to the most vulnerable patients first in what would be a seven day a week operation.

  • It comes as the U.

  • K recorded its highest daily death toll today.

  • Since the middle of May, 532 more people have died.

  • Is our medical editor, Fergus Walsh.

  • This'll is Liquid Hope, the first covert vaccine proven to be effective in production in Germany.

  • If regulators approve it for use.

  • A few million doses of the Pfizer by on tech vaccine should be available in the UK before the end of the year, the health secretary said the military and NHS staff would be on standby to roll out a vaccine from the start of December 3.

  • Uncertainties are riel on the scale of the job is vast, but I know that the NHS, brilliantly assisted by the armed services, will be up to the task.

  • So who is going to be first in line to receive it?

  • Put simply, the older you are, the sooner you're going to be eligible for a co vid vaccine.

  • Currently in pole position are elderly care home residents on staff, then people aged 80 and over, plus frontline NHS workers.

  • The vaccine will then be allocated to younger age groups in bands off five years, but that is dependent on it being effective in older adults, and we're still waiting for that data.

  • Adults under 65 with underlying health conditions will also be given some priority.

  • There should be enough doses off the Pfizer vaccine to immunize 20 million people, so younger adults may have to wait for other vaccines to come through.

  • The Pfizer jab is not intended for Children.

  • Vaccinators will go into care homes to immunize vulnerable older residents.

  • GP surgeries will play a crucial role.

  • Some maybe open seven days a week on large venues like sports halls are also likely to be used for mass immunization.

  • Pfizer vaccine trials were mainly conducted in the United States and Germany.

  • Initial findings suggest it's 90% effective at preventing co bid.

  • 19 caution is needed, but the early results are surprisingly good.

  • Even the optimists amongst us were.

  • We're hoping for 50 or 60%.

  • So this is, uh, this puts this vaccine straight up a top of the league in terms of vaccines that we have and how effective they can be.

  • Traditional vaccines use a weakened or inactivated whole virus, but the Pfizer Kobe jab uses only a tiny amount of genetic code found in the spike protein.

  • On its surface.

  • This synthetic RNA is what prompts the immune system to recognize on Remember Corona virus.

  • This bodes well for other co vid vaccines, which also used the spike protein to create immunity.

  • Yeah, results from the Oxford AstraZeneca vaccine trials are expected in a matter of weeks.

  • Probably you feel fine.

  • If they, too, are positive, it would be another decisive step out of the shadow cast by this pandemic on.

  • Fergus is with me now, so this vaccine could be rolled out in the UK in just three weeks time.

  • If it's safe is three weeks long enough to know so safety Sophie is absolutely crucial.

  • Pfizer says it should have two months.

  • Follow up safety data on all 43 a half 1000 volunteers before it applies for emergency authorization for use in the UK, Europe on the United States.

  • And we're being told there'd be no major adverse effects so far.

  • But we should expect that this vaccine will have side effects.

  • Every medicine from aspirin upwards does on no vaccine is 100% safe, but you have to balance that against the risks from co vid.

  • We had more than 500 co vid related death today on.

  • Then there's the issue of Long Co vid, which has left tens, maybe hundreds, of thousands of people here in the UK with lingering health problems.

  • And then there's also the issue of how long immunity will last.

  • Once you've been given the injection, we simply don't know because the trials only began in July.

  • But the manufacturers and other scientists hope it should provide protection for at least a year or two.

  • Then we may need a booster dose.

  • Now, if the virus starts to mutate so it can evade the immune system, we might need a slightly tweaked vaccine.

  • Ah, booster there like we do with the flu jab every winter.

  • But all that's for the future.

  • For now.

  • Sophie, we remain in the grip of this pandemic on We can't lower our guard.

  • Thank you.

  • Well, The latest government figures show 532 deaths were reported in the latest 24 hour period.

  • That's people who died within 28 days of a positive covert 19 test.

  • It's the highest figure since the 12th of May.

  • It means on average, in the past week, 360 deaths were announced every day.

  • It takes the total number of deaths so far across the UK to 49,770.

  • Meanwhile, plans to carry out more mass testing from the end of November have been announced, including for all university students in England.

  • With more.

  • Here's our health editor who pin getting students home for the Christmas holiday without risking the virus spreading.

  • It's a logistical challenge.

  • Today it's emerged that a week of mass covert testing at universities in England could start at the end of the month.

  • So what does students think the waste have been treated at university has been a warrant like kids have trapped inside one room.

  • That would be great because I really want to go home.

  • Thio see my family, so that would be awesome.

  • I can't see them getting it out to tens of thousands of students across the country in a couple of weeks.

  • Rapid testing kits like this, with results back in one hour, will be used in universities on from this week, NHS staff in England will have regular testing using the same technology.

  • Making it more widely available is one of the government's priorities for trying to curb the virus.

  • But the established test and trace system in England has been criticized for problems getting bookings, delays receiving results on difficulties reaching contacts of those testing positive for Assad.

  • Do you still believe tests and traces working today?

  • The head of test and Trace faced questions at a Commons committee with one MP setting out what was said to be short comings with the system.

  • Given this catalog or failures, should you be reconsidering your position Well, thank you for that report card.

  • If we set back on bond, compare what we've delivered versus what we said we would at the end of July, we have met the vast majority of our commitment.

  • So we committed to building testing capacity data half a million per day by the end of October.

  • Testing capacity today is over 500,000.

  • Today, it's been hard for the testing system to keep up as cases and hospital admissions have risen steadily.

  • The latest daily reported death toll was above 500 for the first time since May.

  • The other figures out today for the last week in October give a broader picture.

  • One way of assessing the covert impact is looking at the total number of deaths from ALS causes.

  • This line shows the five year average for UK weekly deaths, and here's what's happened so far this year.

  • You can see a sharp spike in April, the time of the first wave.

  • The red area shows co vid deaths.

  • There are other excess deaths as well.

  • Some could be linked indirectly to co vid because people didn't seek hospital treatment.

  • Then it falls back towards the average before picking up again, though it's still nowhere near where it was at the time of that first wave and Here's what's been happening in recent months, and you can see just since October, the death toll has gone back above that five year average.

  • Reducing cases and saving lives is the aim of lock down restrictions.

  • Health officials hope that will also allowed tests and traced to beam or effective at controlling the virus.

The health secretary, Matt Hancock, says the NHS should be ready to roll out a coronavirus vaccine by the start of December if it's approved.

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Vaccinations could begin “by start of December” if approved - BBC News

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    林宜悉 posted on 2020/11/11
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