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  • and I've had this conversation on this show many times over the last few years.

  • I had this conversation with Howard Marks before he died.

  • On day.

  • He talked about this, and we've all seen the example that Portugal is with the decriminalization of drugs, which is different from what you're saying, but kind of.

  • There's kind of a few choices.

  • It's the way it is now, which I think most people would agree is a mess.

  • There is the decriminalization, the Portugal model.

  • And then there is your model on the Black Sea model of legalized it all regulated.

  • All have it down to the corner stop and there's arguments for for all three.

  • Howard Marks actually said to me, he said, Brian, I have friends of mine That won't take something if it's illegal, if it's strictly illegal and they'll stay away from these things.

  • And so critics of your plan might say, If my kid goes to boots and seize heroin on offer cocaine on offer, they might be more likely to take it if it's in that package now.

  • That's what some critics would say.

  • That availability might give more access to people who would normally stay away from those back alleys and those things that are illegal.

  • Now, what do you say to that?

  • There may be a spike in usage after the drugs were legalized and they're regulated and their mawr readily accessible to all.

  • There may be a spike in usage, but because we I say we, the state, the government will raise billions and billions in revenue from the sale of these drugs.

  • What that will enable is that our Children from primary school age will be educated about drugs.

  • It won't be a taboo subject which people don't want to go near.

  • You know, my my youngest kids were educated at school away from cigarettes.

  • That all happened in school, on my kids, bearing in mind that my wife and I are foolish, filthy, smelly, idiotic smokers.

  • My kids won't go anywhere near cigarettes.

  • It was educated out of them when they were that big, and they went to school.

  • Now we will be able to afford to do exactly the same with drugs.

  • Get in those schools, get to those Children early.

  • I'm not gonna say we'll end up in a drug free nirvana on in a generation, something we closed all the drugstores there because obviously we want that will never happen.

  • That would be rampantly naive of me.

  • Yeah, I had a gentleman by the name of Dr Carhart, who works at Columbia University in America and has a great Ted talk that's titled Let's Stop Abusing Drug Users.

  • And he implies or says states that as humans, we all like to perturb our consciousness, whether it's caffeine or going to the movies or alcohol or cigarettes.

  • But, you know, a lot of these legal drugs are drugs, caffeine and nicotine.

  • Most people asked on a drug, but it is.

  • We like to experiment with our consciousness.

  • That's what we do, and we always will.

  • And so there is no nirvana where people won't use drugs.

  • But we have this current state where you're saying most of the crime is somehow drug related.

  • Somehow, whether it's money laundering, all of that, and you're saying that would be cut out if we did this?

  • What do you make much of much of its of its now very in mind that you would be taking organized crimes?

  • Largest revenue stream away from them, so they were so quietly they're not gonna give it up without a fire.

  • But if you be organized crime on three fronts, you leave them pretty much We know where to go, and that is price, purity and availability.

  • So you just beat them on in ALS those regards So those drug stores will have to be open 24 7.

  • You know those ones, like clumsily named drug stores, you know, So you beat them on availability, because if you close them at 2 a.m. The drug dealers will come out of 3 a.m. S.

  • So they have to be open.

  • But petrol stations are, but also really, I mean, for example, London or the UK couldn't do this independently of the international community, could they?

  • Because that would create a bunch of instabilities if it's legal here in illegal here.

  • Portugal led the way with their decriminalization.

  • There wasn't a Europe wide 29 state kind of agreement there.

  • Okay, Someone has to be a pioneer.

  • Someone's gotta grasp the nettle and set the example.

  • Canada and its legalization of cannabis, you know, they struck out for freedom in that regard and did it.

  • And it has its critics.

  • I understand that but so many of the critics of of my standpoint there I say it our Mrs Miggins, who lives in the Cotswolds, perhaps in her lovely country cottage and is far removed from the streets of central London on our other great cities, where young people are losing their lives in increasing numbers.

  • On, she might read The Daily Mail, for example, on Go legalization Shock horror?

  • Never.

  • Well, unfortunately, Mrs Miggins isn't really fully briefed and aware of what's going on.

  • Andi, I have I would have a message for her, and that would be I would love to come to your cottage.

  • Andi, have a cup of tea or a cup of coffee and a chat with you about it on.

  • I can guarantee that where so ever she Maybe there's a complete stranger that I would be to that town village Hamlet, whatever it may be, I reckon with your half an hour, I could source whatever I wanted in terms of illegal drugs.

  • It's coming to your doorstep, Mrs Miggins, if it's not already there, courtesy of county lions drug networks being established drug dealers, a very inventive, they're always looking for new markets and new routes and new methods of smuggling, importation, Transportacion and all of that.

  • They're smart.

  • That's what they do.

  • We need to deny them this multibillion pound industry.

  • Okay, what don't you like about decriminalization?

  • Even as a method of getting to legalization?

  • What don't you like about the Portugal model?

  • Why can't It's a halfway house.

  • Okay, It's a halfway house.

  • Come on.

  • I think it should be all or nothing.

  • So how do you grade Portugal?

  • What?

  • What is it?

  • What has worked and what has not worked there there.

  • Pioneers on bond in terms in terms of not penalizing and criminalizing problematic drug users.

  • I applaud them endlessly for that again through the billions that we raise, that we're not only using primary schools for education, but problematic drug users can get the help they need and in so many cases, the help they want it's not for us to take tape will help, might be appropriate.

  • But I guarantee you many, many, many problematic drug users want help.

  • They don't wanna be.

  • They don't wanna be the prey of their dealers.

  • They don't want to be in the living conditions that they're in.

  • They don't want to shorten their lives.

  • They want to help.

  • We could afford to do that.

  • This is about harm reduction on people's health as well as denying criminals control of that industry.

  • Okay, but the decriminalization is only half of the problem that talks really more about the users.

  • But you still have the dealers, and that's and that's still going toe.

  • The same issues pretty much are happening in Portugal.

  • And you're saying solve it all with one fell swoop?

  • Yeah, because dealers still get prosecuted in Portugal.

  • You know, it's not now legal toe deal.

  • You can still get arrested and brought drugs ever be legalized.

  • Yeah.

  • Oh, yeah, Yeah.

  • The drug law reform movement in the UK is gathering pace every day.

  • There are some wonderful people out there who make my opinions on.

  • It looked like something clumsily scribbled on the back of a cigarette packet.

  • You know, far brighter minds than mine who have really thought it out in considerable depth and slowly, bit by bit, politicians are coming on board, you know, a Ness MP Scottish Nationalist Party MP proposed a bill last week in Parliament starting to go down this route.

  • Small, incremental steps personally I'd like to take one giant stride.

  • One giant leap for mankind.

  • Perhaps to go right.

  • Organized crime.

  • Your days are over.

  • We've got that industry now.

  • They're moving into other things.

  • Anyway, They're going into online crime.

  • You know, Andre, so much cybercrime and all of that.

  • Some people are just determined A live, a life of crime.

  • And so they will be forced into something else.

  • It won't all be rosy in the garden.

  • And I know.

  • But in terms of the drugs industry, I would like us we, our government to control it rather than crooks.

and I've had this conversation on this show many times over the last few years.

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B1 drug portugal illegal legalized crime legalization

CONTROLLING THE DRUG MARKET: Why The Government Should Educate Us About Drugs - Peter Bleksley

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    林宜悉 posted on 2020/10/15
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