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  • Midway through the week, welcome to CNN STUDENT NEWS. I`m Carl Azuz. Thank you for making us part of your day.

  • A first report involves martial law. This is when military forces take over a country, usually in an emergency.

  • And this is what`s happened in Thailand.

  • Tensions there had been building for months.

  • People are strongly divided over Thailand`s former Prime Minister Thaksin Shinawatra and his sister, current Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra.

  • A coup kicked Thaksin out of power in 2006.

  • He is now living in exile.

  • Many of those who oppose Thailand`s government think Thaksin is still calling the shots through his sister,

  • but there are many who support him and want him back in power.

  • And these two sides have been fighting each other in violent protests.

  • Well, after a lawsuit brought by senators who oppose the current leadership,

  • Yingluck Shinawatra was removed from government earlier this month.

  • The instability that followed is why the army says it imposed martial law.

  • It says this could last a few months until things come down, but it also says this is not a coup.

  • That the military is not forcing a change in government and that people should continue business as usual.

  • Yesterday, in the town of Moore, Oklahoma, a bell, a prayer, a remembrance of 24 people killed by a tornado one year ago.

  • It was an EF5, the most powerful classification of twister.

  • It was a mile wide in some places, and it left a 17-mile long gash in the landscape.

  • There were scenes of unbelievable destruction.

  • Block after block where only foundations were visible.

  • City officials had to make new street signs so rescuers knew where they were going.

  • 353 people were injured. A school, a medical center, businesses were lost,

  • but for those who`ve chosen to stay, ground has been broken and rebuilding has begun.

  • Today is the public opening of the 911 Memorial Museum in New York.

  • It centers on remembering a dark chapter in American history and honoring the ways Americans overcame it.

  • But that`s not the only thing that distinguishes it from some other museums.

  • Unlike the Smithsonian, for instance, the 911 Memorial charges a fee for the general public to get in.

  • And another source of its revenue, which is accepted at other museums, is controversial here.

  • Praise for its beauty and dignity, there is growing criticism of high admission fees,

  • Praise for its beauty and dignity, there is growing criticism of high admission fees,

  • $24 to get in, and the sale of souvenirs at the gift shop.

  • I think it`s a revenue generating tourist attraction.

  • Jim Riches shares the same sentiment shown in these New York Post headline titled Little Shop of Horror.

  • On sale, items such as silk scars with images of the Twin Towers, bracelets and stuffed animals.

  • It`s not the way Richard says his son Jimmy should be remembered, a firefighter killed on that day.

  • Basically, to make a money off my son`s dead body, I think that`s disgusting.

  • What we know is it`s the right thing that when visitors come here, they want to take a keepsake away.

  • Joe Daniels is president and CEO of the September 11 Memorial and Museum.

  • He had spent the last eight years developing the site, which will cost an estimated 65 million per year to run.

  • The museum receives no government funding and relies on donations, revenue from tickets and money from that gift shop.

  • Should you be extra-sensitive about what you sell there?

  • You know, the truth is this is the United States of America, and the number one thing is, if you don`t like what we are selling, don`t buy it.

  • The number one seller in our gift shop is a book called The Place of Remembrance,

  • which talks about the building of the memorial.

  • Do I expect to say that everything we`ve done here is absolutely, 100 percent right? There`s always bumps in the road.

  • Lee Ielpi lost his son Jonathan who was a firefighter here, and while not perfect,

  • Ielpi says the 9/11 Memorial Museum is like the USS Arizona Memorial in Perl Harbor or the Oklahoma City National Memorial and Museum,

  • Ielpi says the 9/11 Memorial Museum is like the USS Arizona Memorial in Perl Harbor or the Oklahoma City National Memorial and Museum,

  • Ielpi says the 9/11 Memorial Museum is like the USS Arizona Memorial in Perl Harbor or the Oklahoma City National Memorial and Museum,

  • which are also located at sacred sites and have gift shops.

  • Somebody has to pay for these things, regardless how powerful it is.

  • For Ielpi, feeling he has for his son when he sees his name at the reflecting pool, far outweighs any controversy.

  • It`s reflecting absence, it says as if their souls are falling into the water.

  • A fitting tribute for Jonathan? For all of them. Yes. Absolutely.

  • Jason Carol, CNN, New York.

  • Time for the Shoutout. What was the occupation of the person who designed the current American flag?

  • You know what to do. Was it, seamstress, Marine, student or senator? You`ve got three seconds, go!

  • Robert G. Heft was the 17-year old high school student who designed the flag for a history project.

  • That`s your answer and that`s your shoutout.

  • He got a B minus on the project, because his teacher reportedly thought it was unoriginal.

  • But when the design was accepted by the U.S. government, the grade was changed to an A.

  • You`re going to see a lot of those Robert G. Heft-designed flags across the U.S. this weekend.

  • Monday`s Memorial Day when America remembers its fallen service men and women.

  • Whether you know anyone who served in the U.S. military, chances are you`ve seen troops portrayed in movies.

  • It`s part of a long-standing partnership between Hollywood and the armed forces.

  • Whether it`s launching a coordinated attack on Godzilla,

  • using precision aim to take out pirates in Captain Phillips

  • or killing Osama bin Laden in Zero Dark 30, America`s favorite blockbuster hero is America.

  • See, it looks like I`m back in the movie today.

  • From the patriotism of World War II to the special effects of modern day,

  • the U.S. military has long had a symbiotic relationship with Hollywood.

  • In many of these films, the Pentagon offers its expertise, equipment and locations in exchange for some oversight as to its big screen portrayal.

  • When it comes to the movie industry, they want authenticity,

  • it`s much cheaper for Hollywood to go through the military than to stage something like that, completely on their own.

  • By glamorizing the Armed Forces in this theater, the Department of Defense hopes to bolster its ranks in the military theater, while boosting moral for those already enlisted.

  • It`s about portraying the military in a positive way.

  • You know, spit shining their image.

  • We talk about retention, it`s making people in the military feel proud of what they do, and it`s almost like, you know, campaign video.

  • The practice of using the military for film Cameosis, not without its critics, such as former Navy SEAL Harry Humphries.

  • It`s gotten out of hand. There`s entirely too much being discussed about a community that lives on the fact that it`s a group of folks that thrive on the concept called Silent Pride.

  • After all, movies like Godzilla make glorify enlistment for young fans,

  • but obviously, it`s far from the true bore of real battle.

  • Still after more than ten years of war, the line between America`s movie stars and war heroes continue to blur.

  • In 2012`s Act of Valor real Navy SEALs portrayed themselves.

  • While last year, Lone Survivor parade (ph) actor Mark Wahlberg with Navy SEAL Marcus Luttrell to tell the story of Luttrell`s real brush with death in Afghanistan.

  • How close is it to what happened?

  • Oh, I`d say it`s as close as you can possibly without having to have killed some of these guys up on the mountain filming it.

  • I`ve never been more proud to be a part of a project like this. Through the news and different various - you know, media outlets, you don`t really get the same kind of impact on understanding of what these guys do for us.

  • Whether the film industry helps or hurts that understanding, one thing is certain, the villains in this films do not stand a chance.

  • We are taking roll from around the globe today. It`s Worldwide Wednesday on CNN STUDENT NEWS.

  • In New Brunswick, Canada, great to see you all the students at Beth Middle School watching.

  • In Bucheon, South Korea, we are happy to be part of your day at Sunville (ph) Middle School.

  • And in Cairo, Egypt, thank you for watching at the American International School of Egypt.

  • A high school football wide receiver says his whole life changed in five seconds.

  • Here`s what those five seconds showed.

  • He was just playing around, really, decided to throw himself a pass, a long one,

  • he sprinted fast and far enough to catch it and the cell phone video his friend took, went viral.

  • It made national news.

  • Garry Haynes dreams of playing college ball, playing in the NFL.

  • He`s going to make this move part of his daily practice.

  • With skills like that, you can see how his catch caught on.

  • It`s a good thing he did the pass of the pigskin,

  • and didn`t pass on the pigskin because just throwing something out there received a lot of attention and made for one field good story.

  • We`ll be quarterback to business tomorrow, on CNN STUDENT NEWS. I`m Carl Azuz.

Midway through the week, welcome to CNN STUDENT NEWS. I`m Carl Azuz. Thank you for making us part of your day.

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May 21 2014 - CNN Student News with subtitles

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