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  • The bloodbath of World War II is over.

  • Millions have lost their lives.

  • Nazi Germany now rules the world.

  • A group of prisoners are marched down the long boulevard that runs through the middle

  • of the new capital of the Nazi Empire.

  • Hitler is just a speck on the steps of the largest domed building ever constructed.

  • To the right of the prisoners are massive concrete structures that loom like watchtowers

  • over the causeway.

  • To the right are almost identical structures that house leaders of the New World Order.

  • It takes hours to walk down the main thoroughfare towards the man who will sentence them to

  • death.

  • These prisoners have found themselves in Germania, Hitler's newly built mega city and capital

  • of the world.

  • Thankfully the Nazis did not win World War II and Hitler's dream of a city containing

  • gigantic concrete buildings to celebrate his government and ideologies was never completed.

  • Unfortunately for many during World War II the city had been started and thousands lost

  • their lives because of it.

  • Germania was dreamt up by the mind of Hitler, so you know everything we are about to show

  • you is going to be crazy.

  • Adolf Hitler started mapping and planning Germania as early as 1926.

  • This is over a decade before World War II started.

  • His obsession with creating a master race and controlling the world was nothing new

  • when he launched his war to conquer Europe.

  • Accounts suggest that Hitler always disliked Berlin as a city.

  • He thought of it as dirty and disorganized.

  • It was filled with too many leftwing progressives.

  • People who wanted equality and peace, and there was no room for these ideologies in

  • Hitler's future.

  • He promised to fix the city once he had secured power in Germany.

  • Hitler may have dreamt up the idea of Germania, but the head architect for the project was

  • Albert Speer.

  • Speer might have been as deranged as Hitler.

  • They became good friends and spent a lot of time planning and designing Germania together.

  • Apparently Hitler got along well with people who were as crazy as he was.

  • For many years their plans were kept secret.

  • This may have been because many members of the Nazi party thought that Germania was not

  • feasible, and made their leader look slightly obsessed.

  • Hitler described his world capital to be comparable to the cities of ancient Egypt, Babylon, and

  • Rome.

  • He had big dreams for Germania and he would do anything to make them a reality.

  • The first step was the demolition of Berlin.

  • Hitler needed to tear down tens of thousands of houses and buildings so that he could build

  • his dream capital.

  • It did not seem to bother him that a war was going on.

  • Luckily for Hitler, he had some help with the demolition of Berlin.

  • Allied air strikes destroyed large parts of the city.

  • Speer liked to point out that the Allies were helping greatly with the planning efforts

  • of Germania.

  • Again, Speer was a little crazy.

  • All too happy to help, the allies continued bombing Berlin into rubble.

  • In order to make Germania a reality Hitler and Speer needed to change the actual landscape

  • of Berlin.

  • Germania was planned to have massive buildings all on the same level of land.

  • Unfortunately, Berlin is not located on a flat plane, and therefore the topography of

  • the landscape needed to be changed.

  • Where the largest arch of Germania was supposed to be built, the land needed to be raised

  • by 14 meters.

  • To put that in perspective the Nazis needed to raise the ground by a height of two giraffes

  • standing on top of one another.

  • That is a lot of land to create.

  • Reshaping the Earth was not the only insane feat of engineering that Germania would undertake.

  • The city itself needed to be centered around a grand thoroughfare that would be called

  • the North-South Avenue.

  • It would be around 4.3 miles long and lined by massive theaters, shops, and government

  • buildings.

  • In the middle of the North-South Avenue would be a massive arch.

  • It would be named the Triumphal Arch and would tower over the Arch de Triomphe in Paris.

  • In fact, the Triumphal Arch was planned to be so large that it's French predecessor

  • would be able to fit underneath it.

  • Everything needed to be grandiose so that military marches and parades with thousands

  • of soldiers and tanks could traverse the city.

  • The main causeway was not to be used by pedestrians, and so plans to create underground walkways

  • and roads were drafted.

  • Hitler could not have the common folk crowding up his massive avenue.

  • Above ground the streets would be lined with statues and monuments to celebrate the Nazi

  • party.

  • Below ground would be a series of barren tunnels.

  • People would only use the tunnels to get from one spot above ground, to another spot above

  • ground, without creating visible congestion.

  • Basically Hitler wanted to turn the attractive living spaces of Berlin into monuments of

  • order.

  • Attractiveness would always come second to efficiency in Germania.

  • If that sounds crazy, you've seen nothing yet.

  • When architects and urban planners look back at the plans for Germania one thing is clear.

  • Hitler's world capital would have been a nightmare for people to live in.

  • Getting anywhere would be a difficult route of above and below ground roads.

  • Also, keeping with character, Speer did not believe in traffic lights or trams, so the

  • roadways would be complete chaos.

  • It is unclear what the procedure would have been if an underground accident happened.

  • Knowing Hitler and Speer the solution would probably be to collapse the tunnel with the

  • accident and victims inside it and just build a new one.

  • But with the rabble trapped underground, Hitler could build the most beautiful structure of

  • Germania.

  • The crowning jewel of Hitler's Germania would be the Great Hall.

  • The massive domed structure was inspired by the Pantheon in Rome.

  • It's dome would be 16 times higher than Saint Peter's Basilica, which was the world's

  • tallest dome at the time.

  • The plan was to make the dome of the Great Hall 950 feet high.

  • The hall itself would be able to accommodate over 150,000 people.

  • Presumably all of which would come to hear Hitler speak.

  • The grandiose nature of Germania and the Great Hall makes you wonder if Hitler was compensating

  • for something.

  • Adolf Hitler had a dream to make Germania the new capital of the world.

  • Albert Speer helped design the city.

  • But how was it to be built?

  • Who was going to build it?

  • This is where things get very dark.

  • Although it should come as no surprise when talking about one of the most evil men in

  • history.

  • Hitler being the megalomaniac that he was, had very little regard for human life that

  • was not Arian.

  • Even with World War II raging on all fronts he began destroying parts of Berlin to begin

  • construction on Germania.

  • To do this Hitler killed thousands of innocent civilians.

  • Even with a war going on all around him that killed millions, Hitler was busy at home killing

  • his own people.

  • Sometimes you have to wonder if there was any humanity left in Hitler.

  • What comes next might suggest the answer is no.

  • The Nazi regime began systematically kicking Berlin citizens out of their home to start

  • construction on Germania.

  • This began in 1939 as World War II started.

  • German citizens who were removed from their homes were often given the houses that once

  • belonged to Jewish families.

  • Jewish people had been moved earlier to more cramped accommodations in run down parts of

  • the cities.

  • These later became known as ghettos and then evolved into concentration camps.

  • This brings up an important point.

  • Hitler's dream of having Germania be his world capital played a key role in enabling

  • the Nazi party to carry out the Holocaust.

  • In preparations for the construction of Germania, the Nazis had systematically gathered up Jewish

  • families and moved them into areas where they could easily be controlled and eventually

  • killed.

  • Germania was to be built using the blood and lives of the Jewish people.

  • Albert Speer would use the SS to ensure that the Nazi's had enough slave laborers to

  • begin construction of Germania.

  • Speer pushed for more and more Jewish people to be rounded up and sent to labor camps,

  • so that materials could be produced faster and he could begin construction of the mega

  • city.

  • His plan to secure as many Jewish people as possible for slave labor was so ambitious

  • that even his own father told him he was crazy.

  • His father was right, but nobody had seen real crazy yet.

  • The path that would lead to the building of Germania was the path that led to the beginnings

  • of the Holocaust.

  • Obviously for this atrocious part of human history Hitler is to blame, but Speer and

  • the building of Germania played a crucial role as well.

  • If Germania had ever been finished it would have been a monumental testament to the genocide

  • of millions of Jewish people.

  • In order to gather the materials necessary to build Germania, enormous granite and marble

  • quarries were created.

  • The structures in Germania were to be made of concrete, but adorned and embellished by

  • granite and marble.

  • This would give buildings the look of ancient Rome.

  • When examining the locations of quarries around Berlin and comparing them to the locations

  • of concentration camps, they line up almost perfectly.

  • You can probably guess who was being used to mine and shape the marble and granite for

  • Germania.

  • The Nazis used the Jews in the concentration camps to produce the materials that would

  • build the city of Hitler's dreams.

  • Though the Jewish people were affected the most by the building of Germania, but no one

  • was safe from Hitler's and Speer's mega city.

  • The need for labor to construct their monstrosity of a city was so great that the Nazis began

  • rounding up any male beggar, tramp, or Gypsie that was fit to work.

  • Once the war started, Hitler had another influx of slave laborers for building Germania.

  • Prisoners of war were shipped into Berlin to work in the quarries and construction sites.

  • At its height the POW workforce in Berlin was as high as 130,000 people.

  • Although, this number fluctuated since death from being overworked and accidents were common

  • during the construction of Germania.

  • Was Hitler's dream of building Germania possible though?

  • In a word, yes.

  • Architects and engineers that look back at the plans and designs for Germania agree that

  • all of the buildings were technically feasible.

  • The engineers and building experts of the Nazi party had the technical knowhow to build

  • the massive structures that Hitler wanted.

  • Germany also had the resources and labor needed to demolish and rebuild Berlin into Germania.

  • So why didn't the project get completed, or at least further along?

  • Some of the reasons you may be able to guess, others might surprise you.

  • In a somewhat ironic way, the war that fueled Hitler's desire to build Germania ultimately

  • got in the way of that dream becoming a reality.

  • The close relationship between Hitler and Speer led to the Fuhrer appointing his close

  • friend as the Minister of Armaments and War Production.

  • This meant that Speer's attention was shifted away from constructing Germania and to more

  • pressing matters that would support the war effort.

  • The plan was that after Germany secured victory, the building of Germania would resume.

  • Thankfully this did not happen.

  • There was no doubt in Hitler's mind that he would win the war.

  • He expected that once he controlled vast quantities of lands and people, there would be an endless

  • supply of materials and labor to construct Germania to all his specifications.

  • This thought process was made evident by the lack of discussion around the monetary cost

  • of building Germania.

  • It was just assumed that the newly conquered territories would provide all of the materials

  • and slave labor free of charge.

  • Once everyone was incorporated into the Nazi empire, Hitler and Speer could do whatever

  • they wanted with them.

  • It never even occurred to the duo that they would have to pay for labor or materials.

  • It was all supposed to come from winning the war.

  • Would Germania have been an impressive architectural sight?

  • Sure, if you could get past the deaths of millions and homicidal ideologies of the Nazi

  • party.

  • But the world is grateful that it never came to that.

  • Germania was a mega city dreamt up by an insane dictator, and although it was never completed,

  • tens of thousands of lives were lost solely because its construction started.

  • If you want to learn about more things that might have happened if Germany won World War

  • II check out our video What If Hitler Had Won?

  • Or if you want to go the other direction watch What If Hitler Never Existed?

The bloodbath of World War II is over.

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Hitler's Plans for a Mega City Empire, Germania

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    Summer posted on 2020/08/12
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