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  • Can you speak a bit more on how you know policies in the US, you know, are reflected in the UK and vice verse from, you know, the political establishment end from kind of the populist is Well, I mean, some say the Brexit movement was a precursor to Trump.

  • Being elected you again are in this really unique place where you've got a foot kind of on each side and been able to kind of observed both, you know, How do you see that is overall?

  • And then how do you see that kind of moving forward?

  • Yeah.

  • I mean, that's the I mean, I speak about the policy element just first, because I find that to be very, very interesting.

  • The populist, the populist one, which I come to second is, is actually mawr is very, very similar.

  • In many ways, the policy element policy discussion between the two countries is very, very interesting as an observer, because you do just find conversations in the US, which just really on on the agenda in the UK um, Andi that that is, that's both positives and negatives to that.

  • The positive element is that I would say the US for example, You come over here and you realize how I told by the U You realize just how stifling the European regulatory environment has being to British business, and you realize that the golden egg, which has been gifted to us through Brexit, is just bigger than you ever realized.

  • Because as soon as you look at the regulatory environment in the U.

  • S.

  • And you see what can be achieved with a little with a low regulation society, you realize that actually, the UK has been really hampered by its association with the Franco German status model of regulation.

  • And that model of regulation has been rolled out and has been slow creep and has bean, you know, I mean, Thatcher talked about it in our later years.

  • You know, George Bridges, who was, you know, one of the conservative Party kind of Maine strategists he talked about.

  • It is what one of the reasons he came out in favor of the Liberty because, he said, I don't know what my research staff to do, except it's at the time because they're doing work from Brussels and, you know, I saw it in my own business.

  • I have seen it in the corporate on the corporate world in London, and as a result, you've seen this slow creep of you regulation in the U.

  • S.

  • You just don't have that.

  • And it's so refreshing to come over here and find this world where opportunity is rife on, you know, you drive through Middle America and it's like people starting businesses.

  • If there's an opportunity, they moved quickly to take advantage of it, and it's just wonderful.

  • There's such an entrepreneurial go get him spirit of on.

  • I love that.

  • So that is one of the major kind of policy with differences in the US where I'm just like that is a rial that is a real boon to the American psyche.

  • Um, you know, I think on the others on the other side of the corn, you know you Then you've got the policy debates overhead because they are so divisive, you know that that there isn't much middle ground to be had on that is something where you do kind of, you know, concerns me because sometimes you do need this sort of You need both parties to work together.

  • I mean, you did sit in somewhere like criminal justice reform.

  • Eso Criminal justice reform attracted both sides of the aisle and things got done in the UK There is a sense of, you know, occasionally that's coming together.

  • Bipartisanship, where actually good pieces of legislation can be passed in the US as the debate becomes more and more divisive.

  • And as you know, Congress has now been lost to the Democrats and what the Senate is still with Republicans.

  • There's less, and that's which could be achieved.

  • Eso you do sort of feel almost like there's a policy stalemate going on on that could be that could be concerning because, you know, of course, that does need to be legislation passed.

  • And, you know, even if you're rolling back the frontiers of the state, even if you're deregulating, that still needs to be passed.

  • So you know, there is a kind of there is a slightly more divisive system of government over here, which encourages people must not to work together because if they think they're gonna win the next election, they'll just wait until after that election.

  • So that that is a negative, I would say, but Inter and then in terms of kind of unique policies which I find interesting to look at from both the UK and the US perspective.

  • I mean, in the UK, for example, we just don't have the same debate around, for example, vaccinations, which I find very interesting.

  • I I hadn't I don't have any stake in the game.

  • I've never really bean that interested in the debate if I'm honest.

  • Andi.

  • So it's just been fascinating to kind of watch Onda learn about what the differences between the British style of medicine and the American Salomonsson that was so plays into a larger health care debate.

  • The U.

  • S health care system is very, very different to the UK one, and there are very many good things about it.

  • And there are a couple.

  • There are a few bad things about it.

  • You know, we actually require you to work with them.

  • A great lady who runs, ah, consumer rights advocates.

  • I think it is the patient's rights advocates who you advocate on behalf of patients against the kind of cartel of the medical insurance on, and that's being a fascinating thing to get involved in.

  • So the policy, the policy areas are very different.

  • We don't have the same debate around vaccines who don't have a cent debate about abortion.

  • We don't have the same debate around gun control on all three of those points.

  • When you actually come to the U.

  • S, you start learning about them.

  • They're very, very nuanced debates.

  • They're nowhere near a simple Is there painted out to be in the media?

  • Um, and as a result, you know, for example, like gun control.

  • I mean, it's ironic that that that debate will basically die because of these rights on.

  • Do you know, you've seen weapons sales surge.

  • You've seen ammunition sales surge and all because of some riots which broke out so suddenly people are concerned.

  • And then, of course, the liberals have overplayed their hand on this one as well.

  • Defund the police.

  • Well, okay, so if we defund the police is gonna protect us, your your rights of protection will fall back on yourself.

  • So again, it's like a highly nuanced debate.

  • You know, it's not just a simple like Oh, well, everyone in America has an hour 15.

  • That's a nonsense.

  • It's actually about the rights to defend oneself on dso.

  • I actually do think that debate could be could have farm or of ah, nuanced angle taken on it by the by the international media, which is generally just portrayed it as red next one, their guns, which is just upset.

  • Are you, um, them from the from the popular side of the argument?

  • I mean, just quickly on that one.

  • There are There is a lot of similarity about that.

  • And I would say that, you know, the UK and the US have both bought into that kind of populist wave which has swept a lot of a lot of the Western world and actually there you know, the comparisons between Brexit and Trump, you know?

  • And then, of course, you saw similar your six.

  • You're still seeing populist revolutions across most of Europe.

  • You saw the one in Brazil.

  • You know, it's that debate is part of a much wider movement, and I think the U.

  • S.

  • Is a key element to that.

  • But I don't think it's a unique element to that.

  • So Britain did lead the way in many ways, and I think that that kind of that Brexit argument waas so powerful and it did show a lot of people that it can be done, you know, And then the rest of the world has kind of followed it.

  • It gives me some pride, you know, being in being a Brit that I think we let we have the world on that one.

  • I you know, I think that's it.

  • A handful of people in the UK who change the debate to an extent where, you know, we actually changed the course of world history on that.

  • That's an enormously proud.

  • Gives me a lot of pride to say that Yeah, was that difficult for you?

  • Because you must have gotten a lot of heat pushing that agenda over here.

  • Um, yeah, yeah.

  • I mean, I mean again, it's I will.

  • I will often feel sorry for the moderates rather than the people who are really in the fire.

  • You know, with people like Nigel or with people like myself or, you know, other strong levers.

  • Our you know, our flag was pinned to that master a very early from a very oddly step, you know, And as a result, we're like, you know, we like Marmite.

  • You either kind of love us.

  • So you had us on.

  • As a result, If you don't like Marmite, you're not gonna put it on your bread every morning.

  • You know, it's It's that as a result, I did get heat.

  • I had friends who don't really speak to me much anymore because of Brexit.

  • You know, I have other people, even in family who don't really speak to me because of Brexit.

  • Um, but, you know, it doesn't It doesn't really bother me, because it's just like, Well, you know, if the whole if our whole relationship was predicated upon my opinion about one political issue, then why were we friends in the first place?

  • Um, not your decision.

  • You know, I've never ended a friendship because of it.

  • Um, but yeah, you receive heat.

  • The moderates, however, the people who are the swing voters who actually, you know, I know I know a lot of friends and family.

  • Who were those moderates, you know, who were those people who took persuading, who wanted to hear the arguments from both sides, and when they decided to come down on the vote leave side, the backlash from members of their own family and friend group was far worse than it was for someone like myself.

  • You know who really who, as I say, who had that colors pinned to the mast from a variety early stage They received so much he still to this day received so much heat on that makes me signed for them, you know, because they kind of they got into a debate.

  • They never thought this would be the outcome.

  • You know, they just thought they were voting on a particular issue to do with sovereignty and the future of Britain.

  • It turned out to be something completely different.

  • And now friends won't speak to, you know that that's that's something that shouldn't have to happen.

  • But that's where that debate took Britain.

Can you speak a bit more on how you know policies in the US, you know, are reflected in the UK and vice verse from, you know, the political establishment end from kind of the populist is Well, I mean, some say the Brexit movement was a precursor to Trump.

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BREXIT & DONALD TRUMP ARE CONNECTED: How British People Changed The Course Of History |George Farmer

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    林宜悉 posted on 2020/08/06
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