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  • all right.

  • Today we're gonna talk about video games and how much video games are currently impacting your world in a way that you may not even be aware of.

  • So one of the things to talk about is how many people are video gamers, and they're gamers.

  • They may not even realize that you may name realize that you're a gamer.

  • So there are 2.2 billion gamers in the world that's almost 1/3 of the world's population is considered a gamer.

  • Now, if you play something like words with friends, you're also a game.

  • And so some of you might say, Well, I don't really play on my phone.

  • I don't play words with friends or the other kind of video games, but you're probably still engaged with video game content.

  • Take something like linked in linked in itself has employed video gaming techniques to get people to fill out their profiles.

  • In fact, once they did that, they added badges, progress bars and even cool new titles like All Star profile.

  • When they did that, they had over a 55% increase in the number of people that started filling out all that data for them.

  • So gaming is this really engaging technology and techniques that are being applied all over the place and having impact in your world in more ways than you can imagine?

  • So let's start out talking about entertainment.

  • How much is entertainment change?

  • Currently, if you took the music industry in the movie industry and you combined it, that's still smaller than the video game industry.

  • The industry is massive.

  • It's changing television as you know it platforms the streaming platforms like YouTube, which put content to two billion people per month.

  • Then everyone knows people on average spends about 40 minutes watching YouTube content.

  • You take a live streaming platform like Twitch, which is centered around gaming, and there are 100 and 40 million people every month watching it, and they have twice as much interaction.

  • So you've got people watching over 90 minutes a day watching people play video games, not even playing them.

  • So just watching people's entertaining enough, you can look at something like sports, and it's changing the face of sports as we know it today.

  • So this is the first year that a legal legends competition, if you don't know that international kids or somebody else they'll know.

  • So Legal Edges Tournament actually had Maur viewership than the Super Bowl for the first time.

  • And so when you look at that and you think, OK, what you take all of the n b A final games combined them.

  • That's still less viewership than one legal legends tournament.

  • And those tournaments air happening all the time in all different games.

  • It's a massive industry.

  • It's changing other things, too, like education.

  • It's changing how we deploy education, how we use it.

  • Bill Gates is said that game based learning is the future of education.

  • So why, How does video game do this?

  • So video games are built around what we call engagement loops, how we actually engage you actions and reward systems that happen inside of those games.

  • And they're tuned and adapted so that we can measure between challenge and ability.

  • And the goal is, those are just as your abilities adjust, that you never get frustrated because of the challenges too hard, or you get bored because it's too easy.

  • And in gaming failure is expected.

  • In fact, if you didn't ever fail in a game, you would get bored with it, and it wouldn't be fun.

  • That is an example experiential learning style, which is one of things we use an education.

  • It's a safe place to fail and to learn.

  • So when we talk about application, we did.

  • With that.

  • We built a game for a global X Prize competition called Codex, and it was the Teach Adults How to Read and Dallas area alone.

  • There are over 600,000 adults that are functionally illiterate.

  • So we built a game and to try toe help with this problem, we did some focus groups.

  • We talked to them and we tried to take some of their ideas and put them in place.

  • So one of the things they said they wanted to feel like a sense of accomplishment.

  • So in the game we use a library and shells, and their progress was tracked.

  • How many books I could get on that shelf.

  • They want to learn about real world places around.

  • So in the game, when they master the level it actually turned in and showed them real places, and it talked about him and trained them to let them understand things like about the Sphinx or the different locations they travel to, and the last, most important one was a self consciousness that was built around.

  • The idea of their literacy is being so low.

  • So we created a game which actually uses an ancient language that nobody knows.

  • So there's no reason to feel have self conscious because you cannot understand this language.

  • And as they go through and they're crafting these words together to drive us to decipher this riddle, this ancient language, they're actually learning how to read.

  • And as a master, those levels, they get to learn about all these different places in the world that they've never been able to see you or hear about or even read about.

  • So when you apply all that questions, how does it work?

  • Worked really well.

  • In fact, we want a grand price.

  • We want a grand prize and achieve my prize for the X Prize, and what we did is we accomplished in nine months.

  • All the participants had over a year's worth of educational increase in their literary skills just by playing a game.

  • So it was very effective.

  • Game is changing.

  • Discovery is changing sides and how we do things.

  • Example of that It's very popular, folded.

  • It was an HIV protein folding problem, and it took over 10 years of them trying to apply different machine learning in A I techniques to it and they were coming to an end.

  • A partner with the game school at University of Washington.

  • And in 10 days, 53,000 gamers found the solution to the problem have eluded them for 10 years.

  • That's the power of gaming.

  • It is a solution finding platform.

  • We took the same idea and we took data from the drug Discovery Lab out of S M.

  • U.

  • And we took that and trying to say, Could we start applying this in the same manner?

  • So we built some really simple interface is to see how could we visualize the data?

  • How could we interact with the data and create our own engagement loop around it?

  • So the general goal was to turn this block on the right hand side into green.

  • So this is kind of what it starts out looking like a really simple mechanic.

  • And after about 20 minutes of game play, it looked like this.

  • And so that meant that we were onto something that there was.

  • People could actually play a game that knows nothing about cancer research, but they could actually help us do some work.

  • So we integrated into a game called Minecraft, and so we made some out of occasions.

  • We put it in there, and we actually hosted a livestream event, and you can see that little rectangle shows up inside the game just as well.

  • We had four streamers do an event.

  • It was a two hour long event.

  • We had 1700 people online.

  • We analyzed over 500 images and over 1500 cancer compounds in that two hour event.

  • It was fantastic.

  • So we took that and we sought to go to the next level with it.

  • So we created two games.

  • The one on the right is called rocks and roots.

  • In fact, you can download right now on any APP store.

  • It's out there, and whenever you're playing that game, you're actually helping us refine our techniques for analyzing cancer data and other types of data that fit into the platform as well on the left hand side as another game called Omega Cluster.

  • So we took that, and we integrated it into a platform onto Twitch.

  • And so now you have an interactive game sitting inside a twitch.

  • And this was through a partnership with complexity.

  • Gaming bounced me in technology and our game lab at S M U.

  • And we had over 11 million pitiable view or 11 million views of the site during the event.

  • It was integrated to one the world's most popular games called World of Warcraft.

  • And while people were just had downtime, they weren't playing.

  • The game was in a loading state service, rebooting or just leveling up the characters.

  • They would just play our game In that time frame, we had over 55,000 minutes of engagement in 10 days.

  • That's the equivalent of having a full time person working on our data for 23 work weeks in 10 days.

  • It was a massive amount of computation capability that was given to us just by creating a simple gain and peoples off times.

  • So what if we start taking gaming and partnering it with a I Now we already know that a eyes using gaming, you have things like Starcraft and uh, that's being used by Google to help train.

  • They're generally I they're using grand Theft Auto to actually train autonomous cars because the world is so robust.

  • But what if we actually partner with a I specifically, we have gamers partner with a I to try to make them smarter and better and do what we can't do separate but do it together.

  • So to do that, we first have to explain what a iess.

  • So I thought about how could I do this?

  • And so I think the best way for me to explain to you how a I works is by pinata.

  • And so, hey, I worked just like this kid.

  • You just just randomly So we're trying to find a candy finding algorithm, and that thing is just swinging away, right?

  • He doesn't know where it's at if it hits and tillage candy drops has no idea of its being good or bad.

  • It does.

  • At this point, it doesn't know.

  • So what if we add humans into the loop with the say Aye, well, we get a lot more effective all of a sudden, Now we can help guide they I say the pinatas right here striking.

  • And then it could start getting more effective once it starts understanding where to be, and I have to learn the whole problem and learn just a piece of it.

  • And so that partnership starts.

  • Six seller rate our capabilities dramatically.

  • And what if we had gamers?

  • It's super charged at that point.

  • So while powers are a great way to explain a I, I figure it might be best if I actually showed you an example of what something we did with this.

  • So we built a tower defense game to help identify macular degeneration and retinal scans, and you'll see here that there's these retinal scans like this one.

  • That air then pushed into a gaming environment and people are playing this game.

  • All they're trying to do is to figure out the path that these alien mech warriors are gonna be taking so that their orbital satellite systems to come in to destroy them.

  • But really, they're helping us segment and identify disease inside of the eye.

  • Macular degeneration affects 66% of the elderly population is the leading cause of blindness and first world countries, so it's a problem that there's no solution for and there's not something.

  • It's very accurate.

  • So how did this work out So here we can see all these traces that people were doing on the first level.

  • First time it was all over the map.

  • They were experimenting, trying to figure out where diseases in the eye.

  • But after about the fourth level, all of her answers started to converge.

  • And so now they were predicting in a general area where the disease was in the eye.

  • So what we did is that normally you just take the image, try to process that there's some sort of a I and it predicts up the end where the diseases, what we did is add this extra layer.

  • Now the eye has not just the image but an initial guess created by gamers themselves, a crowd, a community, and that guess gets packaged with the data.

  • And now the eye doesn't have to learn as much.

  • Now has a little help from the community of gamers that air sitting there playing this game with it.

  • So how does that affect it?

  • What does it actually do?

  • Well, here's the results.

  • We have two different curves here.

  • The orange is the game enabled A I, and you can see how quickly it rises close to 99% accurate its ability to identify the segments inside of the image.

  • While the standard methodology is still about random guessing, 50% is if it's right or wrong, there's a random guess.

  • So it was vastly outperforming it.

  • So our next step was, Well, what if we sent some type of image, some type of disease that we've never even trained today on inside of the eye?

  • How could it perform then?

  • So this is what we did.

  • Now the image on the left.

  • We have two different segments that we're looking at.

  • The blue is showing you the accuracy for each one of those 97 images.

  • And the green is how much it was for the standard.

  • Aye, aye.

  • Now on the left, it looks like there's not plotting the green.

  • It's actually there.

  • It's just between 0 to 3% accurate, so it's really difficult for it to even find the disease in Iaw.

  • It has no training on it.

  • While something that is collaborative, working with a human has the ability to go much faster, much further.

  • So this is all powered by gaming.

  • So when you think of gaming, it's touching areas of your lives you wouldn't expect.

  • It's changing your world in the environment around in what used to be a subculture is now part of our culture.

  • So gaming is your life and is being brought to you.

  • Thank you.

all right.

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Your Life, Brought to You by Video Games | Corey Clark | TEDxSMU

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    林宜悉 posted on 2020/04/13
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