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  • thank you for a task that not so long ago would have seemed unimaginable.

  • A center better known for holding worthy conference is ready to take a CZ.

  • Many as 5000 covered 19 patients.

  • The beds and equipment lined up, ready and waiting.

  • Today there are over 9000 positive Corona virus patients in hospitals across England on we know that number is only going to increase.

  • That's why what you see here is a mass mobilization taking place right across the country, but also that these new Nightingale hospitals There's lots of people upstairs working right now that it from mostly our London hospitals, mostly our intensive care star for their nurses, doctors Oh, DPS physios.

  • They're all coming together.

  • And there's 400 people like now upstairs being trade, and they need Maur.

  • But staffing has become a critical issue in itself.

  • One and four nurses and doctors are now either sick or self isolating.

  • The GM Be Union said today that more than 4000 ambulance workers across just eight trusts are off work.

  • Testing, testing, testing, as the World Health Organization likes to put it, is being increased now for staff trusts told to allocate up to 15% of their daily capacity for England's N.

  • H s workers in quarantined households.

  • Since mid March, Wales has already tested 1000 staff look familiar.

  • They've even set up testing stations like these again, having taken them down after the government said only patients with pneumonia and hospitals and care home clusters should be swamped.

  • So just over 8000 were carried out in England yesterday on just under 5000 people.

  • Not for 10,000.

  • Ministers have claimed the weekend and it's a long way from Germany, where they test half a 1,000,000 a week.

  • The hope by those in government to that the controversy over personal protection equipment or P P e might die down walls in vain.

  • Plans to update the advice to hospitals, GPS and community workers have been delayed.

  • They were meant to be signed off on Friday.

  • This doctor demonstrated the apron, who was given to wear in an urgent treatment center.

  • He took in his own face Children overalls but was told to leave if he didn't feel safe.

  • War is the particles from the virus that could spread t on on on you, the best place to be protected requires neck above the area and the apron.

  • When you put it on, it's open around the chest line.

  • The trust told us it was not the standard approved by Public Health England, and that it was important that staff comply.

  • Yet we have been contacted by N HS staff from across the country who are making or buying their own protection equipment.

  • A graph released today at the Downing Street Press conference shows admissions have gone up at about the same rate for the past few days.

  • That shows that it's going up not in an increasing amount going up in a constant amount, which may suggest that were already beginning to see some effects through.

  • But with the doors due to open here on Wednesday, the warning is that the worst is yet to come.

  • Well, Victoria joins me now.

  • A lot of figures fly about today.

  • How can you make sense of them?

  • For us, it's become deeply confusing.

  • I mean, you have to say it's very impressive that they've been able to open this hospital, the Nightingale Hospital, so quickly, but within that there remain these concerns.

  • As I said in my VT over peopIe the personal protection equipment and over testing.

  • So we're not seeing the widespread testing that, as I mentioned with or in Germany and what we're not seeing our across the road ray off death rates now.

  • This is because they haven't been looking at what's been happening in the community.

  • So if somebody dies at home or in a care home, and you have we have felt that this hasn't given us a proper picture.

  • But from tomorrow, the O.

  • N s for England and Wales will start publishing rates from the community once weekly, where a death certificate lit lists covered 19 and Scotland and Northern Ireland will be doing something similar.

  • So we should start to get a better picture of what's really happening out there.

  • But it does remain the problem that we don't have this testing in the community so you can get a proper balance of how many people have got covered.

  • 19 compared with how many people are dying that still feels some way down the line.

  • Victoria, thank you very much.

  • Social distancing is starting to make a difference.

  • According to the government's chief scientific advisers of Patrick, Ballots published data showing that transport use across the country has plummeted to 1/4 of normal levels over the last 10 days.

  • He said that the number of hospital admissions was going up, but at a steady pace, which suggested that the clampdown was already having some effect.

  • Our political editor, Gary Given, is in Westminster, Gary.

  • Well, as you say, the chief scientific adviser, clearly saying they're in the press conference today that he now thinks enough has been done on two parts of government policy.

  • Thio, maybe mitigate what?

  • What could have been an even worse a number of deaths in this country.

  • On the one hand, the clamp down, which produced some graphs showing, had really taken an enormous hit on transport the number of people who are getting too close to each other, all the rest of it on on the other, the government increasing the number of intensive care unit beds around the country.

  • The combined effect of these two things, he said, is and he used the word should.

  • He now thinks we should under undershoot the intensive care unit provisions so not overwhelmed as it had been feared.

  • The intensive care unit provisions that is in the country, as I say, partly because the bed's being boosted.

  • But partly, he said, because of this clamp down, which of course is only a week old today said that standing next to me in that press conference, the foreign secretary, Dominic Raab, he was focusing on the £75 million of the government says it's going to put into bringing back Britons who are abroad were traveling for work or for pleasure all over the world and haven't managed to make it back.

  • That money is going to go into charter flights.

  • Individuals may have to contribute Thio affairs, but he's really not easy to get some of these people back.

  • If you look online at what various ambassadors and high commissioners a saying in their messages online, they're saying, If you're in the wrong part of the country, which has had an extraordinary clamp down on travel and you're not near an airport, it is going to be extremely difficult for you to get cross country toe a plane even if a plane is laid on.

  • Dominic Rob, of course, is the man who is meant to deputize for the prime minister if he is indisposed but the prime minister is still doing his job, even though he's suffering from the disease himself.

  • On We discovered that the prime minister's chief aide, Dominic Cummings, has also had to go home.

  • He's showing symptoms covered.

  • 19 a sign of just how difficult it is, perhaps to maintain the government's own distancing guidelines in the cramped and old fashioned surroundings of 10 Downing Street.

  • Carry Given in Westminster.

  • Well, joining us now via the Internet.

  • His professor Hugh Montgomery, who is professor of intensive care medicine at University College London.

  • Professor Montgomery, the chief.

  • You know, scientific advisor Patrick Balance today suggested there was cause for optimism in today's figures.

  • Do you share that view?

  • I just packed it completely.

  • Actually, he's He's a completely principle, almost man.

  • And so is Chris.

  • So witty.

  • And so I share his view.

  • If he's expressed it because it will be right.

  • The fact that things aren't moving up exponentially as they were has to be a good sign.

  • But of course it doesn't mean that we're not still facing massive pressures because we're already facing a lot of pressure and the numbers of patients is still mounting on.

  • That's going to cause us for the trouble now.

  • You were very worried last week about intensive care beds.

  • Are you Maur encouraged, particularly with the opening of the Nightingale Hospital?

  • Well, I have to pay tribute to my colleagues.

  • We're trying to set that up because these are very difficult times on dhe.

  • It's worth perhaps offering a slightly more nuanced approach to this because I think that's sometimes helpful.

  • I'm We've had all of us, I think, across the country to expand up the capacity to deliver a critical care.

  • And thats required a dramatic change in the sort of work that we do in the way we practice it.

  • So what we might now look at as an intensive care beds is not quite quite the same thing that we would have viewed a couple of weeks ago.

  • So, for instance, we've had to train different staff.

  • So it crossed trusts in Great Britain with the bedside support.

  • Nursing care that didn't bring direct care are often not critical care.

  • Trains nurses, but have been rapidly inductive, has supported why critical canIs, where normally that bed would perhaps up one critical care nurse to that bed.

  • We now have one critical care nurse looking after three or perhaps even six beds, and we've had to use a change in equipment so we would have had.

  • Perhaps that's called it the Rolls Royce of ventilators, that things that help you to breathe, which are supple and allow quite sophisticated management of lungs on.

  • We've now had to move in many cases to the use of anaesthetic machines, which are very much more simple devices for blowing it in and out.

  • So whilst we're saying we haven't run out all bed spaces, the nature of the work in those beds has now changed dramatically.

  • Onda.

  • Actually, at this point, I I must point out the extraordinary work of our nursing staff.

  • They are absolutely taking the brunt of this, having to perform in a way they never have before.

  • And they are remarkable.

  • How close do you think we are to the eye of the storm?

  • At one point, it was sort of April the third.

  • Then people said April the 13th.

  • But what are we talking about now?

  • Well, I don't know the data and the last data I heard was we were aiming for April 13th or 14th.

  • If Patrick suggesting that we're now often exponential curve.

  • I guess it's possible that either we will still peak on the 13th or so of April, but that the peak might be lower.

  • On which case, thank you to the British public who have socially distance because if they are helping with that, flattening, that curve will have made a lot of difference.

  • And I think in fact, in many ways, that's the most important thing, unless worried about when I ask you specifically, so sorry to interrupt.

  • But can I ask you specifically about the sophistication of this equipment that is being used in the hospitals?

  • I mean, are there enough people now able to operate it?

  • Um, there are enough people, but we're having to change your working practices.

  • So, for instance, the first step, if one goes to a hospital with this disease if active management is undertaken, will be simple oxygen to breathe in as higher and higher levels.

  • The next step is to wear a hood or a tight fitting mask that applies constant pressure inside the lungs to support the lungs.

  • And then the next step is to go on to a breathing machine that does the work for you now until two or three weeks ago, the use of these tight fitting hoods and masks and the high concentrations of oxygen so Paul would definitely have taken place in an intensive care bed.

  • But now that is happening in many trusts on general wards, but with support of anesthetic colleagues.

  • So we're just having to deliver in a different way.

  • So are we able to provide the staff at the moment?

  • Yes, we are.

  • But it's by doing things in a way that we weren't doing them a few weeks ago.

  • On briefly does the Nightingale Hospital, with its enormous number of beds, Does it kind of mean that we are sort of within the bounds of control In terms of being able to provide beds?

  • I'm I think it's going to make a lot of difference.

  • And again, my credit credit goes to people trying to set this up.

  • It's It's not a situation when it would like to be in its being built, because conventional bed, such as we have and conventional ventilators are likely to be exhausted, So we're having to expand capacity in a different way.

  • This won't be a standard intensive care units by any manner of means it all in terms of staffing or equipment.

  • But that isn't in any way criticism because we are where we are.

  • If we are going to exhaust the capacity we have conventionally in hospitals, there is only one solution and that is trying to create something else that might offer us the support that is otherwise lacking.

  • It won't be the same as a standard intensive care of three weeks ago, but it will be capable of offering life support in some way, shape or form.

  • First, a human camera, Thank you very much indeed for joining us.

  • Thank you.

  • Thanks.

  • Now a group of MPs has written to the government urging charity on which employees should and shouldn't keep on going to work, saying that non essential workers were being put at risk by some employers.

  • Our factory bosses a warning that they're in danger of being vilified for keeping operations running.

  • Meanwhile, the Corona virus is causing Maur airlines to scale back operations or ask for a government bailout.

  • Our business and global trade correspondent Tamara reports.

  • If the nation's on lock down, we're not flying anywhere either.

  • Today, easyJet brought its entire operation tow a halt it had already counsel.

  • Most service is in recent weeks just running rescue flights to repatriate Britain stranded abroad.

  • For now, they've stopped, too.

  • All 344 of Easy yes, Plains across Europe, stacked up on going nowhere.

  • The airline have told us they didn't expect that to change until May at the earliest.

  • So that's nearly two months, making no money whatsoever at the moment.

  • No, The Allies says there is no plan to ask the government for a bailout.

  • EasyJet haven't ruled out taking up one of the loans that government has offered all businesses, though that's a bit rich, some critics have said.

  • For a business that managed to pay shareholders £174 million in dividends just a few weeks ago, Scotland's airline, Logan Air, is coming home.

  • This is an industry and ill health, though, because of Corona virus regional airline Logan Air saying today without government help, they simply won't survive.

  • The nation's empty arteries tell a tale of an entire economy grinding to a halt.

  • There are still some pockets of industry ploughing on, causing many to ask just what is essential.

  • These are the main inner components of the magnet in an m R I machine.

  • In fact, 50% of the world's MRI's have parts in them from this factory.

  • But the boss here says mixed messaging from government has left staff wondering whether or not they should be turning up to work.

  • They're gonna be some people home.

  • Look at this and think couple.

  • This is just a business here.

  • That's what it really worried about is their bottom line.

  • I find it quite defensive that there's people talking about profiteering.

  • That is not what's going on here.

  • No, we can't function unless our material supplies air.

  • They're providing the material and the Fastness and the fixtures and the welding consumables and all the things that we need.

  • More than 100 MPs have written to the government urging them to be stricter on who can and can't work.

  • Labor Mayor of Manchester says he's at 1000 e mails from workers forced to continue despite fears for their health.

  • Fundamentally, then, are you happy for any nonessential businesses to carry on working in this environment?

  • No, particularly because I think stay at home should meet state Oh, you don't have to be out, then you shouldn't.

  • But where do you draw the line?

  • Because manufacturers we've spoken to say they're essential.

  • Their suppliers would argue that they are not essential, but they are.

  • If manufacturers are to carry on doing what they do.

  • I think that's the issue, isn't it?

  • Everyone will argue that they're essential.

  • For this reason, all that reason on, we could all have that debate that could go on.

  • Endor spend Wisley The government has said that non essential work can continue, so the point is, surely it is to continue making sure that people are safe as they go about that work that has got to be the issue Well.

  • Manufacturing is still running, though No essential.

  • Do you think makes to be certain the doors are going?

  • You need to think through all the various nuances.

  • It's often one of the smallest pieces in the jigsaw, for that actually spoils a picture, and you can't quite finished the job.

  • The significance of that really doesn't think it through.

  • In the era of Corona virus, the wood essential occupies a great space.

  • Many workers say they fear for their well being.

thank you for a task that not so long ago would have seemed unimaginable.

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B1 intensive care government intensive care essential staff

Coronavirus crisis ‘will worsen over next few weeks', says UK chief scientific advisor

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    林宜悉 posted on 2020/03/31
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