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  • I see some homeless here who came to my Ted talk.

  • I'm glad you have to take some time away from getting stoned and playing X box.

  • I try to dress up a little, but they were closed that turtleneck spot, and I'm trying to party after this.

  • So I just dressed up for the next spot.

  • You're looking at me like I can't believe they book dumb.

  • I'm looking at your like reads a Malcolm Gladwell book.

  • Once they told me Look dumb, you might look dumb, but I told him I'm gonna make my momma proud.

  • Like a good son.

  • I'm gonna body Ted like a kid going to sleep on his waterbed.

  • I'm gonna battle rap Ted talking genre Bender.

  • I'm a vet.

  • I could do this with my eyes closed.

  • I've been on tinder for, like five years.

  • So what's another slide show?

  • This is all freestyle.

  • I don't even need rehearsing.

  • If ted was a real life person, he'd be a virgin.

  • Uh, that's what I would say.

  • That's what quick demonstration of Hollywood battle, Ted, if he was a real life person.

  • But he's not.

  • So don't be offended.

  • Only got her, Uh, when I was 15 years old.

  • I ran went to a bunch of terrible rap names until I landed on dumbfounded.

  • Yeah, that was the best option.

  • Somehow I was a teenager searching for his identity, and I happened to find it in hip hop.

  • Specifically battle rap.

  • I was this skinny, nerdy class clown who get bullied a lot, and I mixed my love for hip hop in comedy to avoid getting beat up.

  • I would verbally destroy my bullies and always had the last laugh and then got beat up After, uh, whoever said sticks and stones may break my bones, but words can never hurt me was bullshit because that should definitely could hurt you.

  • Uh, I love hip hop.

  • It was raw, unfiltered, and it was unapologetically black, which actually helped me become unapologetically Asian.

  • But before all of that, you know, I wasn't proud to be Asian.

  • It wasn't necessarily that I was ashamed to be Asian.

  • I don't understand what it meant to be Asian.

  • Ironically, I grew up in Koreatown, Los Angeles, the largest population of Koreans after Korea.

  • So you would think I had this Korean shit figured out but actually didn't and it seemed a lot of the kids in my neighborhood did.

  • They weren't just Asian, they were super Asian.

  • We called them ese en because obviously Asian was too long award that it had to be shortened.

  • A V ends had dragon or koi fish, tattoos drove and race import cars.

  • It could run through a pack of Parliament lights in one parking lot, sitting or better yet, squatting.

  • But most importantly, they were proud of their heritage.

  • Everything I wasn't at the time, and truth is, I just couldn't relate.

  • I was this.

  • Ah, Asian kid agent skater, Sorry, Asian skater who grew up with black and Latino kids and attended underground hip hop events so underground that we never even took one high resolution photo.

  • And my parents didn't help me through this awkward stage either.

  • You know, they were too busy chasing the American dream, which ultimately destroyed our family.

  • My dad was an alcoholic who followed my mom every day until I was in the untitled like 14 years old, and they split and which allowed me a lot of freedom.

  • And I don't have a lot of self this disciplinary figures in my household, but on the positive side, it allowed Meteo have the freedom to explore the city, soak into culture and ultimately meet the people that would change my life.

  • I remember the first time, uh, I got in a battle.

  • It was a freshman year in high school and we were freestyling during lunchtime.

  • We're in a circle Everybody spend their rhymes And this one kid next to me all of a sudden spit a rhyme directed at me said I chew up these rappers like juicy fruit shot up to the homey here, Lucy Liu Uncanny resemblance.

  • Yeah, but I remember that.

  • And, uh, this is interesting bit that Dave Chappelle did a couple years ago.

  • He said he saw this white comedian on stage that was getting heckled, and the white comedian got so pissed that he called this African American woman in the crowd The n word and this was caught on camera, phone.

  • Everything it spread made headlines.

  • But Dave Chappelle said when he saw that dude on stage, he himself knew he was 80% comedian and 20% black because although he was hurt, the first thing that ran through his head is like damn this dude is having a terrible set.

  • And that's how I felt when I got called Lucy Liu.

  • I felt like I was 80% battle Rapper and 20% Asian because the first thing that ran through my head was like, Goddamn, that was good.

  • Think of something fast.

  • So the first line thought I was like, Yeah, bitch, I am Lucy Liu.

  • Twist your neck like a Rubik's Cube and put my foot in your ass without using lube.

  • I felt like six beer, but I heard the news and Oz.

  • I immediately got addicted and, you know, it's amazing, like it was this feeling.

  • But most importantly, I found the first thing I could identify myself as I was a battle rapper in a battle rap gave me identity and you know, you're really passionate about something when you're out in the city going around and you're battling grown men using mean poetry, and then you come home with a smile on your face without making a single diamond.

  • You're like, all in a day's work.

  • That's my boat.

  • That's why I came home.

  • So after I became the best battle rapper in my school, you know, I was filling myself, and my friend told me about this, like, open mic in South Central Los Angeles called Project Blowed.

  • This was in a legendary neighborhood of Leimert Park, and this was home to the best rappers in the city of Los Angeles.

  • Even people from out of town and wrappers from out of town would come here.

  • This is the weekly open mic, the tester skills.

  • So me being a young, cocky, arrogant, rapid, I was stepped up and battle the first guy I saw there, and I instantly got destroyed.

  • It was humbling, a little bit traumatizing and made me go back to the drawing board.

  • You know, this place didn't care if you were Asian, brown, black or white.

  • They just cared if you're whacker tight, you know, And, um this is where you know, battle rap taught me humility.

  • They even had this open mic sign up sheet where you can perform a song on stage.

  • Um, but this wasn't a regular open mike.

  • If the host encouraged a crowd to start chanting, please pass the mic.

  • If you were whack like during your song, and you have to just get off stage.

  • So you know I'm like, Okay, I'm gonna bring some heat.

  • So I prepared a song.

  • My best song.

  • It was called Wizard of L.

  • A.

  • It was a song talking about the city of Los Angeles using Wizard of Oz references, some real gangster shit.

  • I just knew it would kill.

  • I went on stage, started performing 15 seconds in Please pass the mic.

  • It was like they practiced this shit like an acquire something.

  • Motherfuckers were harmonizing and Shipley's past Mike I got it was reminiscent to the Apollo Theater in Harlem, where people boo cats offstage if they're not feeling you.

  • And ah, you know, I think there's two ways people kind of take this instant criticism.

  • First, the performer might get mad.

  • They're like f y'all y'all don't know talent, talent If it slapped you in the face Second, it lights a fire under your ass and you come back every week making sure you don't get booed.

  • And that's what a place like project Blow different me gave me thick skin, you know, sharpen my sword.

  • It was it was my dough, Joe.

  • It was my hard words of rap.

  • Keep it coming without the gangster references right there.

  • Hogwarts of rap.

  • All right, Um, but yes.

  • Oh, uh, you know, eventually I come week after week and I became a part of this family that I'm still part of today.

  • And I started kind of getting good at battle rap and I started battling people on a national scale, people from all over the world.

  • And I noticed one thing.

  • I noticed all the opponents that I was battling.

  • They didn't have much knowledge about Asian people.

  • They would hit me with the same stereotypes over and over again, and I would get hit with the same four Asian celebrities over and over again.

  • But of course, we're in 2020 now the post crazy rich Asians era.

  • So there's Allie, six Asian celebrities that times have changed.

  • That's changed.

  • Um, yeah, but but and and another thing started happening all the easy and kids from my neighborhood that once alienated me started coming up to me and giving me props like Yo, thanks for holding it down for people you're representing.

  • And in the words of that prez, it became bigger than hip hop.

  • That's when I realized I was representing and giving a voice to a lot of people who might not have had a voice and, um, men.

  • That's that's when battle rap taught me pride and gave me pride.

  • I felt like I was a Boy Scout that earned his ese en badge.

  • You know what I mean?

  • By the way, I think this character from up was Korean, actually shot out the Pixar, Uh, but also, it wasn't one sided.

  • I would battle a lot of people from different ethnic backgrounds, too, and I caught myself resorting to the same stereotypes.

  • So that'll wrap top me about my own ignorance as well.

  • Um, battle rap is debate.

  • It's ah, it's theater.

  • It's spoken word rap stand up all in one.

  • It's a dialogue requires a lot of listening, and it requires a lot of understanding of your opponents and the people you're battling.

  • Ultimately, it's a lot of setups to get to a few punchlines, and to get to that punch line, you have to understand a lot of people.

  • You have to earn that punchline.

  • I feel like my life has been a series of hidden Mrs by took that shot, and every shot brought me closer to that punch line.

  • A good punch line is when an audience is not expecting that.

  • And I was something that they weren't expecting, you know?

  • So I encourage everybody to take those shots, You know, I'm saying and get to the front line so you'll have your chance to spit your punch line.

  • Thank you.

I see some homeless here who came to my Ted talk.

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B1 asian battle rap hip hop mic battling

What Battle Rap Taught Me | Jonathan Park | TEDxRutgers

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    林宜悉 posted on 2020/03/26
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