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  • careful around your eyes, right?

  • Oh, yeah.

  • I definitely got a little in my eye.

  • Oh, God.

  • Hey, what's going on?

  • Everybody for first refis Dom Shaun Evans and you're watching Hot ones.

  • It's the show, Todd Questions and Even Hotter Wings.

  • And today we're joined by Seth Meyers.

  • You know, it was one of the longest tenured cast members in Saturday Night Live.

  • History, of course, is Show Late Night with Seth Meyers weeknights on NBC is also the co creator of I Have Seized Documentary Now, which is set to return for Season three on February 20th.

  • Seth Meyers.

  • Welcome to the show.

  • Thank you for having me.

  • So I know that you've had the hot chicken at Bolton's and Nash.

  • I have?

  • Yes, thank you.

  • Hold up.

  • I hold it pretty well, but that was probably the most uncomfortable I've ever been when I've enjoyed the meal.

  • So I remember my wife and I were then driving and had to both sort of have our heads out the window like dogs.

  • That was my memory.

  • While you ready for round two?

  • Yes.

  • Let's do it.

  • So the first one's the classic.

  • That's right here.

  • Okay, Great.

  • All right here.

  • Yeah, delicious and manageable.

  • So you and I were actually born at the exact same hospital in Evanston, Illinois, and I know that you moved away at a young age but returned to go to college at Northwestern Mustard's last stand.

  • Hot Dogs.

  • Overrated or underrated, I'm properly rated, I think.

  • I think people who say you have to go there or maybe overselling it, But I think it's a wonderful thing after a football game or before a football game, it's pretty good hot.

  • Did you ever go toe Hackney's during your time at Evanston and get one of those fried onion bricks?

  • Didn't big miss out?

  • It sounds wonderful, but I don't Yeah, I remember you were studying improv in Chicago at a time when people like Steve Carell and Tina Fey and Stephen Colbert the second City feeder some curious on your perspective is someone who went from the improv Olympic in Wrigleyville to 30 Rock and then tow late night.

  • How do you quantify the Chicago comedy scenes impact and influence on the entertainment industry at large?

  • Well, I think the world's luckier now that there's improv communities in L.

  • A and New York and there's also because of how much easier it is to shoot things and put them online.

  • There are a lot of different roads, too success, but Chicago used to be sort of the main road, and I think some of the best people in the world would come there to get their start.

  • And when I went toe my new student week, my parents brought me out and we went to Second City and I saw a show with Carell and Colbert and just realized how much I wanted to be doing what they were doing.

  • I saw Tina Fey do her first show at Second City, just randomly on the night I was there.

  • I saw people like Amy Poehler, Rachel Dratch, and it was just I didn't realize until years later.

  • Not that I was seeing the best people Chicago, but they were also the best people in the world.

  • They just happen to be in Chicago, so it was really I felt incredibly lucky to be there then.

  • Unless there's a secret kick, I'm well in hand.

  • Enjoy it while you can says we touched on in your intro.

  • One of the longest tenured Saturday night live cast members, never the well of queries runs deep so well, with some of our most pressing SNL questions on this way.

  • Go for it, Lorne Michaels.

  • The mythology around him is so vast.

  • You remember your first conversation with him?

  • Do, um I was living in l.

  • A.

  • In time, I'd audition, uh, on my way off the stage.

  • He stood up and shook my head and said, Good job.

  • And years later, I realized that was not a common so but I didn't know at the time.

  • That was a big deal.

  • I flew back to L.

  • A.

  • Ah, full week later, they flew me back out to New York just to meet with Law RM.

  • And I saw his office.

  • I didn't realize at the time that meant that I had the job.

  • Lauren is very bad at giving specific messages like Welcome to the show.

  • And one thing I remember him saying, Waas, we're going to see how you look in wigs.

  • We want to do a wig test before we hire you.

  • And then I worked there for 12 and 1/2 years and I realized that's not a thing.

  • I don't know why He said it was a thing, and I just went back to L.

  • A.

  • Worried about how I was gonna look in wigs.

  • What?

  • I failed a wig test.

  • I don't know why he said it to this day.

  • He also said, Do you think you can live in New York?

  • Which I realize I just thought to myself, who blows it at this part, right?

  • The interview.

  • Who was SNL audition says, Oh, is it in New York?

  • Does it have to My parts have to be in New York to, um I was, ah, you know, a full three or four years that he stopped being sort of.

  • This comedy icon started being somebody I worked with.

  • And then, you know, this celebrity guests.

  • My guess is that most of them come in.

  • They're excited.

  • They're bright eyed.

  • They're down for whatever.

  • Yeah, I know that There's a Kanye West moment every now and again.

  • Yeah, when you think about the times that somebody came in and just messed up the vibe for everyone all week Is there a story that stands out I mean messed up of Ah, you know, I'm I'm always loath.

  • Feel like call somebody out my name tonight.

  • Name names, but I But yes, that people's definitely screwed up the mine.

  • I was Kanye because I can say this is a huge fan of Kanye.

  • The way Kanye would screw up the vibe was he would he made.

  • And I think he changed the way musical performances happened at the show.

  • He made them bigger than they were.

  • He would bring in sets, different lighting, you know, he bringing ballerinas, 50 ballerinas, and he's a bit of a perfectionist.

  • So you know what was always slotted for two hours or her?

  • Some music with Kanye would be three hours, four hours.

  • I rose.

  • Now the downside is, it pushed everybody else's day later.

  • The upside was that it was never a time where he gave his music performance, and you didn't think that he had made the most of it.

  • Do you have a live on air screw up or break that you're most embarrassed by, um, in your first year, they try really hard.

  • If there's a week where none of your sketches get picked, they try to at least have you have one thing to do so that you can go through the process of getting Aaron makeup on and getting into wardrobe at least once and not just sit in your room feeling bad for yourself.

  • And a lot of times that means you have one question as a reporter in a press conference.

  • And that's what I had.

  • And during the sketch, I just remember in my head thinking I can't believe him on SNL.

  • And then I heard someone else say my line.

  • And I realized that I had just drifted off completely, missed my cue.

  • And when I went back and watched it, it really just cuts to me like this.

  • It's exactly what your face would be if you were daydreaming about how cool your job was.

  • Where's Patio from?

  • Denver, Colorado.

  • Gonta.

  • I feel like a storm's coming.

  • I think you know my nose isn't running yet, but I can feel it start to yeah.

  • Um, on.

  • So, uh, you know, I still have a great deal of concern.

  • I know that your lifelong sports fan and I was amused to read that as a child you'd use your allowance money to subscribe to the Post Gazette so you could keep up with your beloved Steelers and growing up in New Hampshire.

  • Do you think that EA sports are a real sport?

  • I do.

  • I will admit it took me.

  • I didn't, uh, immediately come to that conclusion, but I think everything about it is, I mean, to play a sport.

  • That is about reaction time.

  • And I think strategy, which a lot of sports are and then not risk Physical injury seems like a pretty good deal.

  • Um, but it seems like a short career thinks the younger kids have faster reaction.

  • Think faster than any sport.

  • Uh, that thing goes, I think in like, 22.

  • You're, like, basically breath.

  • Should they keep playing sweet Caroline during the eighth inning of Red Sox games?

  • Or stop playing Sweet Caroline during the eighth inning of Red Sox games?

  • It's pretty decent tradition and a good sing along.

  • I think the ultimate bigger problem the Red Sox on their fans are up against is how they've went from the most charming underdogs in the world to now, you know, basically the Yankees in different uniforms, and then I know that you're partial to the athletes that have come on Saturday Night Live.

  • Yeah, so what I want to do is just hit you with a few big names that were on the show when you were on it.

  • I just wanna know what you remember about working with them.

  • Okay.

  • I got you.

  • LeBron James.

  • LeBron James.

  • It's still stunning to me that when LeBron James on the show, I believe he was 22 years old and he was still in intellectually mature.

  • Such a gentleman, Really fun hanging out with.

  • And, ah, delightful host Peyton Manning.

  • Peyton Manning.

  • I remember we did that United Way sketch where he was mean to kids, and I went over to him between takes and said, Hey, can you do you think you can hit that kid in the back of the head with a Nerf football?

  • And I realized it was the most insulting thing to say it.

  • NFL quarterback.

  • He just looked at me, said, Yeah, I can hit the kid, All right?

  • It's getting hotter.

  • It was hard for you.

  • You know, at this point, I feel like I'm so battle tested.

  • That battle hardened.

  • Yeah, I know what to expect, you know?

  • Plus, I feel like as a host, don't you have to just put up a better front for your guests, like I need to be confident and stow it because otherwise you might panic.

  • That's true.

  • I try very hard not to say during any interviews.

  • This isn't going well.

  • Just I know.

  • I know this is your first time on the show, but they usually go better.

  • So sketch comedy is sort of a mis understood discipline, I think to a lot of people as someone who understands it at a technical level, do you think that there's a difference or a disconnect, and what sketch writers think is funny and what audiences think is funny.

  • And Eminem Verse, for example, might be so focused on the mechanics of wrapping that to the average ear.

  • It doesn't even sound good.

  • I see.

  • I don't know if we think about it.

  • In terms of mechanics, I do think music is different than comedy.

  • This one's really hot, and I'm worried.

  • Um, I also I should be careful around your eyes.

  • Well, I didn't, um I'm wearing my show makeup.

  • Yeah, now I'm ready.

  • It's gonna melt off.

  • So this is just a scientist like I do want people to know, like my face starts melting.

  • I don't want to panic.

  • Is there a sketch that you wrote that you think is funny that you thought was funny that you still think is funny, but that bombed on air?

  • I do.

  • This is gonna seem thematic.

  • This is the last sketch I wrote that in the end I think was accurately treated as bad by the audience, so I'm not standing out for it.

  • But Melissa McCarthy hosted my last episode, and she had ordered 200 chicken wings, and she was pretending like there was a party.

  • But it became very clear that she was had ordered them for herself.

  • And my last sketch played the total silence.

  • And, uh, and Lauren looked at me, and I remember him saying, What am I gonna do without you look atyou splitting bones clean and wings out here?

  • Um, it's a true story, Riley.

  • That's disgusting.

  • How much are the true story?

  • Okay, I work at the Improv theater in Amsterdam, and we had chicken wings were something you could order, And, uh, one night we were standing by, uh, the pinball machine playing pinball, and my brother saw me.

  • My brother also repeater.

  • Basically sucking the chicken wing and he was said, are those years.

  • And I said, no.

  • Uh, and he said, You just sucking someone else's chicken wings.

  • And I said, I am.

  • And then someone else said, I also think there from yesterday.

  • All right.

  • Said, Well, we have a recurring segment on our show called Explain that grammar.

  • Do a deep dive on our guest.

  • Instagram pull interesting pictures that need more contacts.

  • Okay, great.

  • So I'll bust out the laptop.

  • I'll show you the picture, and you tell me the bigger story.

  • Does that sound good?

  • Sounds great.

  • All right.

  • Laptop, please.

  • Thank you, sir.

  • All right.

  • First things first.

  • How in the world did you end up that easy season to within a winter?

  • And Kim, I was told that I was personally invited by Canyon, so that's the only reason I went.

  • Wow.

  • Um, and then I saw him afterwards, and it wasn't, uh, not that I expected it, but it wasn't as though he didn't say Thanks for coming.

  • I'm glad you got my invite, but it was I knew I was gonna sit next to in the winter, so I That's the only time.

  • I think I've worn sunglasses inside.

  • I didn't see a lot of stuff that I thought would look natural on me.

  • I didn't see I wouldn't like.

  • Well, that's an ensemble that I could pull off.

  • Well, I think you should at least try some on.

  • Yeah, I could try someone.

  • All right.

  • Have you picked up any cooking tips from your segments with action Bronson?

  • He's a friend of the program Action.

  • Bronson is the most cursing we've ever had.

  • I think if you based on the beeps, you might not at the end of it here.

  • Enough words to know how to prepare an octopus.

  • I don't You know, I gotta be honest.

  • I think most of our late night cook excitement People aren't writing down howto prepare the food.

  • Yeah, and they certainly weren't for action, but he's a lot of fun to be around.

  • Adobo Loco.

  • Lo.

  • Hey, kid, on a very ah, very frightening word.

  • When you're eating, you want to see loco on a menu?

  • Usually.

  • So like you, I grew up watching Letterman, and that era of late night wasn't as politically driven as it seems Like.

  • This new era is you know shows like yours.

  • Colbert.

  • Political Commentary It's right at the core of the show, and I'm curious.

  • To what extent do you think that shift is driven by political satire becoming more popular genre?