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  • Hey guys! Welcome to another episode of Idioms We Heard This Week.

  • Today, we're going to discuss some real idioms that we heard and used this week.

  • David, you thought of a great one.

  • Now, this isn't really an idiom, but it's an interesting way to use a word.

  • So, so many words in American English have different uses, different meanings,

  • and one of them iswaffle’.

  • What do you think of when you hear the wordwaffle’?

  • I think of delicious breakfast.

  • Oh I thought of crappy frozen Eggo breakfast. Okay,

  • so it can be homemade and delicious it can be less good and frozen,

  • but a lot of people probably think first of the food.

  • Yes, definitely.

  • You think first in food.

  • But then you used it in a different way this week.

  • Right.

  • So I used it to say equivocating, right?

  • - Going back and forth. - That's a hard word, yeah, let's use a simpler word.

  • Going back and forth about something.

  • Unsure about what decision to make.

  • Right.

  • So we were talking about potty training with Stoney who's two years and four months and it's time to do it.

  • Time to do it.

  • But I was waffling, I was feeling like, yes, it's time to do it

  • but, oh, it's going to be so hard maybe we can put it off for a little bit.

  • And do we do it for the nighttime potty training at the same time?

  • - Which method do you use? - Right.

  • So I know in my heart that it's time

  • but also I wish it wasn't and so I was waffling a little bit. I was going back and forth.

  • He was waffling.

  • Now another thing that has been a phenomenon sort of recently is the idea of waffling something.

  • Can you waffle it?

  • - Do you know what I’m talking about? - No

  • It's like putting all sorts of different foods in a waffle iron.

  • -To see what happens. -I did not that's a thing.

  • That’s a thing.

  • Okay, I’m going to put a link to that, in the description below.

  • I'm very sure I can find a video of someone putting weird things in a waffle iron.

  • A waffle iron is the kitchen

  • appliance that you use to make waffles at home.

  • Another word like that where it's a single word,

  • single spelling, but it has lots of different ways it's used is the word

  • smart’.

  • And I was thinking about,

  • so we're watching the NBA playoffs, by the time this

  • goes live, perhaps a champion will have been

  • declared already, but it's still playoff time now.

  • - And this player’s for the Celtics, right? - Right.

  • Boston Celtics, and his last name is smart.

  • And we were watching the game a couple nights ago and something happened.

  • He kind of got knocked to the ground.

  • It looked like it hurt.

  • And I said: oh that's got to smart.

  • Which is hilarious because his last name is smart.

  • But what that means is if something smarts,

  • I think it can be both physical and emotional, don't you?

  • Yeah. Mmhm.

  • So if it smarts, like, let's say you scrape your knee on cement

  • and it stings, that smarts. - Yeah.

  • But also something can smart like

  • if you run into your ex-boyfriend with his new girlfriend

  • that might smart, that might hurt emotionally.

  • - It's a little bit of an ouch. Or anOoh, that stings.’ - Yeah.

  • Stings, that's a good way, physically and emotionally, to describe it.

  • It has another meaning completely unrelated which I think of when I think of the way someone dresses.

  • Like a smart dresser.

  • I would say, clean lines, simple, chic, sophisticated.

  • Any other words you would use for that?

  • You got it.

  • Yeah, so smart can be used a couple different ways.

  • An idiom that I heard this week, I was talking with my friend

  • who was talking about his wife

  • and he was saying how she does most of the parenting in their family.

  • And he used the phrase

  • she does the lion’s shareof the parenting.

  • And I thought good idiom.

  • The lion's shareis the majority of.

  • So, let's say you're working on a project

  • but the other people,

  • they're too busy, they're not really focused on it, you end up doing the lion's share of the work

  • and you hope that your professor notices because you want to get credit for that.

  • The lion's share.

  • The majority.

  • David, can you think of any other idioms with lion?

  • So I thought of another one which isinto the lion's den

  • and so we use that to say that you're going into a hostile environment in one way or another.

  • So maybe you know that you're going to do a presentation at work

  • with the knowledge that it's kind of, you're pushing things, or you're not, you're pretty sure it's going

  • to be not well-received, you would say

  • Is it with the bosses who are a little bit standoffish and difficult to get around?

  • So you might say to a friend the night before: Yeah, I'm headed into a lion's den with this one.

  • Or back to sports.

  • Yeah.

  • We talk about home court advantage in the in the NBA playoffs.

  • And so the Sixers were in Boston and it was like being in a lion's den.

  • They were taunting and being merciless and really

  • jeering and just being, just really, really harsh.

  • - So the Sixers were in the lion’s den. - A hostile environment.

  • -Theyre in a lion’s den. -Yeah.

  • So, I'm in a Facebook group and someone was.

  • posted something saying someone just told me I had a chip on my shoulder

  • and to be funny she took a picture of herself with a Pringle chip

  • on her shoulder and she was like: how's this for a chip on your shoulder?

  • So when someone has a chip on their shoulder it means that.

  • oh, it's hard to explain.

  • Uhm someone might think they have a bad attitude about something.

  • What would you say?

  • - Well that's… - Has history with something?

  • If you have a chip on your shoulder,

  • you have an agenda, you have a really strong, maybe over the top

  • focus on what you're doing?

  • See, that is not how I would describe that.

  • If have a chip on your shoulder?

  • Yeah, I think of it as being someone who

  • because of something that happened in the past, they have a negative.

  • they're coming into a situation

  • with a negative experience, with a little bit of like an aggressive edge

  • and someone could say she has a chip on her shoulder, what's her problem?

  • Yeah. Mm-hmm.

  • So coming into it, really focused on:

  • I’m going to do better this time or I’m going to,

  • I’m going to make a different impression this time.

  • - A little, like you come off too strong. - Okay.

  • - Definitely not easygoing. - No.

  • And definitely like you're coming into a situation

  • carrying baggage from a past situation.

  • And also maybe it's a way to say it is you're coming into a situation

  • making a lot of assumptions about how it's going to go.

  • You know, you're coming into the.

  • Into a meeting with a chip on your shoulder.

  • You're coming in, sort of:

  • I know how this is going to go

  • so I’m on edge, and the first moment that I see: yeah, I knew it was going to go that way.

  • I'm jumping on that theme and going with it.

  • So let's try to come up with like a concrete example of this.

  • Let's say that your coworker

  • was left off of a project that she wanted to be on

  • but she didn't get put on the team.

  • And a couple months later it's a new meeting and we're deciding who's going to work on what projects

  • she comes in being really aggressive about what she wants to work on.

  • And it might seem like she has a chip on her shoulder

  • from the last time she got left off the team.

  • - Perfect example. - Yeah.

  • - Chip on her shoulder. - Mm-hmm

  • Okay, here's one that I used recently.

  • I was getting my taxes done

  • and I have a great accountant, Sarah, we love her.

  • But she asked me to review the tax return that she had prepared and

  • I mean, the reason why I had her do it was because I don't understand it at all.

  • So she said: will you review this before I turn it in? And I said:

  • Sarah I will read it over and I will review it, but it's all Greek to me.

  • What does that mean?

  • It might as well be in a completely different language

  • - that you don't understand it all. - Right.

  • Right. Yeah.

  • If something's all Greek to you, that means you don't get it at all.

  • Not even a little bit. It might as well be Greek.

  • As someone who doesn't speak Greek, my taxes might as well be in Greek.

  • Now if you were from Greece

  • and you were in America, and you said

  • that idiom, it'd be pretty funny

  • because it would no longer have the meaning.

  • True.

  • Okay the last idiom that I can think of

  • that we heard this week ispushing buttons’.

  • This is a good one.

  • - Do you remember when that came up? - Yeah.

  • Stoney and the dishwasher.

  • And he's been in a terrible two

  • - kind of a phase. - So terrible.

  • We use that phrase in American English:

  • Terrible Twos, because it's this difficult phase of

  • constantly pushing boundaries and constantly just.

  • -Saying no. -Looking and prodding and.

  • Yeah he's constantly sayingnoright now

  • and so he's been getting under our skin a lot.

  • - Another good one. - Another good one.

  • Love the kid but he gets under your skin when he's

  • constantly screamingno’, throwing a fit having a meltdown.

  • Irritating.

  • - Mm-hmm. - Yes.

  • So go ahead with pushing buttons.

  • So he likes to push the buttons on our dishwasher

  • and sometimes it turns on and it's

  • a mess and it's not full or whatever he screws it up.

  • And so he was pushing the buttons and David asked him not to.

  • So of course he kept doing it

  • and David said: Oh, you really know how to push buttons.

  • And it was a double meaning because Stoney was

  • literally pushing the buttons but what it really meant was:

  • you know how to do something that bothers me.

  • To provoke me, to get under my skin.

  • Exactly.

  • To kind of be annoying on purpose.

  • - Yeah. - Just to test the boundaries.

  • - Push your buttons. - Yeah, that's right.

  • So guys, that's it for Idioms We Heard This Week.

  • Is there an idiom that you heard that you need help defining?

  • Put it in the comments below.

  • Also, I think this series with David

  • doesn't just have to be about idioms.

  • - I think. - Right.

  • We can open it up to other questions.

  • Do you have a question about American culture

  • or something like that?

  • Feel free to ask!

  • The other thing I wanted to say was this

  • format of this more conversational video with David

  • has grown out of the podcast that we did in 2017.

  • We have about 25 episodes

  • and those are all available on iTunes. You can get them on my website.

  • They're a great place to go to study

  • idioms and we talked about lots of things there,

  • our travels, we talked about pronunciation, of course.

  • So please feel free to check out

  • rachelsenglish.com/podcast

  • and that's it for now. We look forward to seeing your questions.

  • That's it and thanks so much for using Rachel's English!

Hey guys! Welcome to another episode of Idioms We Heard This Week.

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Idioms | Learn 5 English Idioms in Conversation | Rachel’s English

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    林宜悉 posted on 2020/03/09
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