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  • Hey, happy fourth!

  • So, today isn't the fourth but the day that you'll be seeing this is the fourth of July.

  • So today is the 2nd of July and I'm here with some friends in the park

  • and we're gonna talk about what we're doing for the 4th and Fourth of July traditions.

  • What do you typically do on the fourth of July,

  • - like the 4th of July is on Tuesday. -Fireworks.

  • Fireworks.

  • Going to see fireworks is a much beloved tradition on the 4th of July in America.

  • Probably the most common tradition.

  • A couple years ago, I took you up

  • to see the view of the fireworks from the roof of my apartment in Manhattan

  • and made a video there. That was a great view.

  • We're going to see fireworks and then like, usually there's like a family grill out.

  • Family grill out.

  • The verb 'grill out'.

  • This confuses some people because the word 'out' seems like an extra word.

  • Almost always when you grill, you're grilling outside.

  • Certainly, he could've dropped the word but he said grill out

  • which is similar to cookout

  • which implies that the food is being cooked and eaten outside.

  • Usually, you invite people over for this. It's a little bit of a party.

  • So a grill out is where you do this with a grill.

  • He definitely could've just said: We're going to grill.

  • Or he could've said: We're going to have a cookout.

  • But some people do use the term grill out.

  • Usually, there's like a family grill out.

  • Family grill out.

  • But that was before I had my own family.

  • Yeah. So what do you do now?

  • Uhm. Now, I'm not sure. We're new to the starting traditions.

  • No fireworks though, right?

  • I heard they scare babies.

  • --We might go to fireworks. Probably not this year.

  • Did you notice how he pronounced the word 'probably'?

  • He reduced it to something more like pry-- pry not--

  • But pry not this year: Pry-- pry--

  • Americans really reduce this word.

  • You can say probly, prolly, or pry.

  • He doesn't even really make an L sound.

  • I wouldn't necessarily recommend it as a non-native speaker.

  • But you will hear native speakers do this.

  • Pry not this year. Pry not. Pry not. Pry not.

  • - We might go to fireworks. Probably not this year. - Really?

  • - Yeah. We're not going to try this year either. - Eventually. Eventually, we'll go to fireworks.

  • Fireworks really scare dogs. We need to take care of him.

  • So you guys have no idea what you'll do on Tuesday? Do you have off?

  • Do you have off means have you been given the day off at work?

  • As in for a holiday in this case.

  • Do you have off?

  • I do have off. We might do some grilling. We'll see friends.

  • But uh, it's to be determined.

  • Yeah.

  • To be determined.

  • This is a phrase you can use for something that's not yet certain.

  • We're definitely leaving tomorrow but I don't know the time yet.

  • It's to be determined.

  • But uh, It's to be determined.

  • Yeah.

  • We might try to go one of these state parks with like a swimming beach lake in New Jersey.

  • -- That sounds pretty cool. -- I just feel like,

  • for me, I want a body of water involved in my 4th of July plans.

  • A body of water refers to something like an ocean, lake,

  • maybe a spring, sea, pond, that kind of thing.

  • For me, I want a body of water involved in my 4th of July plans.

  • That sounds like a good plan to me.

  • - Yeah. - Yeah?

  • I don't know.

  • -- Find a place to swim. -- Yeah.

  • It's just hard with the nap time. Don't you hate it when your life gets ruined by naptime?

  • Dave and I both have babies about the same age, a little over a year.

  • And I know for us, we want to keep our baby on a schedule because we think it makes life easier.

  • But at the same time, it kind of makes life harder.

  • Yeah. It's just hard with the nap time. Don't you hate it when your life gets ruined by naptime?

  • You guys haven't made that happen yet, right? You guys are still flexible.

  • Nope. We are pretty flexible.

  • Yeah.

  • Our son pretty much dictates when everyone is to fall asleep.

  • We still live and die by a schedule.

  • - We're not very scheduled. - Yeah.

  • Besides our own work schedule.

  • - Pros and cons to both approaches. - Yeah!

  • Pros and cons.

  • This is a way to discusss and talk about things that are positive about a situation

  • and things that are negative about a situation.

  • For example, if someone's having a hard time making a decision, sometimes, the advice is:

  • Why don't you write out at list of pros and cons?

  • He started talking about traditions again so I turned the camera back on.

  • Where I grew up in Lancaster, there was always a bunch of fireworks done by each like little borough.

  • Vocabulary word: borough.

  • A borough is a town or district incorporated within the US.

  • So here, he's talking about Lancaster which is a country.

  • And within that county, there would be Lancaster city but there are also lots of little boroughs.

  • Also in New York city, Brooklyn, Queens, Manhattan, the Bronx, and Staten Island are called The 5 Boroughs.

  • A bunch of fireworks done by each like little borough.

  • So there would be days of fireworks around the 4th of July.

  • What do you mean days? Like entire days where there was like a fireworks

  • -- in 2, 3... -- No, there would be like the 3rd,

  • -- the 4th, 5th.. -- Yeah. Right.

  • Depending on if it's on a weekend.

  • But like you can go to a like couple consecutive nights of fireworks.

  • Yeah.

  • Vocabulary word: consecutive.

  • This means following continuously or right in a row.

  • An unbroken sequence.

  • So 'on 2 consecutive days' means 1 day right after the other.

  • No extra days in between.

  • -- to a like couple consecutive nights of fireworks.

  • So did you ever?

  • Sometimes, we would. Uhm, the biggest one was in Lancaster County Park

  • where there actually had an orchestra

  • -- as well. -- Oh, nice!

  • That's-- where I grew up in Gainesville, there was like an outdoor amphitheater.

  • Vocabulary word: amphitheater.

  • This is a building, usually an outdoor building, often without a roof,

  • rounded, semi-circular,

  • used for the presentation of musical events or maybe some drama.

  • There can also be tiers of seating.

  • --in Gainesville, there was like an outdoor amphitheater with some pops band doing stuff and some fireworks.

  • That was every year. Never strayed from that. Picnic and fireworks.

  • Yeah, that was like the biggest one.

  • There are definitely places like that in Philly, right?

  • We're just not going cause we have babies.

  • -- Right. -- Yeah.

  • They-- in Philly, they set up at the art museum.

  • Oh yeah!

  • And they do really big firework production

  • with even, there's always like some live band.

  • I'm not sure who it is this year though.

  • Okay.

  • -- I think The Roots did it one year. -- Really?

  • Well maybe next year when the kids are older, we'll all go together.

  • -- That sounds good to me. -- That'll be fun!

  • Huge thanks to my friend, Dave, for being in this video.

  • That's it guys! Thanks so much for using Rachel's English!

Hey, happy fourth!

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B1 pry grill july lancaster consecutive borough

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    林宜悉 posted on 2020/03/09
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