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  • This is the Rachel’s English 30-Day Phrasal Verb Challenge!

  • Learn 30 phrasal verbs in 30 days!

  • Jumpstart your vocabulary in 2017.

  • Today is Day 27 and we're studying phrasal verbs withworkday 2.

  • We have a lot of phrasal verbs here, so I had to break this video up into two videos.

  • To work against something means to make it harder to get the desired result.

  • His criminal history is working against getting a job.

  • To work around means to find a different way to do something.

  • This is what happens when you had a plan, but a problem came up.

  • You have to work around it.

  • The tennis courts are already reserved when we want to play.

  • Well, were just going to have to work around it. Can you meet earlier?

  • We use this a lot as a noun, just one word with no space:

  • The architect has to come up with a workaround. The skylights she wanted aren’t available.

  • To work at means to try hard, to put effort over time.

  • If you want to get better at basketball, you have to work at it.

  • To work away means to do something, with effort, over time.

  • We often use it in its ING form.

  • Is Chris studying? Yep, he’s working away up in his room.

  • This makes it sound like he’s been studying for a while.

  • What have you been up to?

  • Well, I’m working away at this Rachel’s English 30-day challenge, trying to learn new vocabulary.

  • Work in means to include something, or also, to make time for something.

  • Can you meet with the client Thursday?

  • My schedule’s tight, but I’ll try to work it in after lunch.

  • Or, I read your story. I love it, but I think you should work in the part about having lunch with your mom.

  • In other words, write that part into the story.

  • To work something into something else means to mix it in.

  • You might see this in a recipe. Work the extra flour into the dough by kneading it.

  • To work yourself into somethingwe use this with the wordfrenzy’ a lot.

  • It’s the same as getting worked up.

  • You become very agitated.

  • She worked herself into a frenzy when she thought she lost her friend’s cat.

  • You could also use this withrage’. He worked himself into a rage before confronting his father.

  • Work off: This means to get rid of something.

  • I’m going to work out to work off that heavy lunch.

  • That means I want to exercise to try to burn some of the calories I ate at lunch.

  • Or I went for a walk to work off my bad mood.

  • It can also mean to repay a debt.

  • It took me three years to work off my credit card debt.

  • Or, when I wrecked my dad’s car, he paid for it.

  • Then I had to work it off for the next year by helping out around the house.

  • To work on someone means to try to convince or persuade someone to do something.

  • Hey, did you convince Matt to come with us tonight?

  • No. Alright, well, I’m going to go work on him.

  • Or the clients don’t want to buy the deluxe package, so we have to work on them.

  • It’s the best deal for them.

  • Work. A lot of people have a really hard time with this word.

  • Let’s figure it out.

  • We begin with a W consonant, where the lips are in a tight circle. Ww.

  • Then we have the R vowel and consonant.

  • Just one sound, rr. Wor-.

  • So the lips go from being really rounded to being a little less rounded, but still flared.

  • Wor-

  • The tongue tip is forward for the W, put pulled back and up for the R. Wor-

  • So the tongue tip isn’t touching anything for the R sounds.

  • Worrrrrrr.

  • Hold out the R when practicing words.

  • It really does help solidify the tongue position. Worrrrrrr-k.

  • For the K, the tongue tip can come back down.

  • The back part of the tongue lifts up and touches the soft palate, then releases, kk.

  • Work. Work.

  • I often see people trying to drop their jaw too much for this word.

  • wuh-uh... wuhh---

  • Wor- wor-

  • Watch all of the jaw positions. You really don’t need to drop your jaw.

  • W-or-k.

  • Work.

  • So simple, very minimal jaw drop.

  • Work. Work.

  • To catch all of the videos in this 30-day challenge,

  • be sure to sign up for my mailing list, it’s absolutely FREE.

  • And definitely subscribe to my YouTube channel and LIKE Rachel's English on Facebook.

  • Click the links in the description.

  • This 30-day challenge is leading up to a phrasal verbs course

  • that will be available on my online school on February 1.

  • Rachel’s English Academy is a collection of online courses focusing on English conversation,

  • pronunciation, and listening comprehension.

  • You will understand Americans better and speak better English with these courses.

  • Visit rachelsenglishacademy.com to sign up and get started today.

This is the Rachel’s English 30-Day Phrasal Verb Challenge!

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B1 phrasal tongue jaw lunch rachel english tongue tip

PHRASAL VERB WORK part 2

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    林宜悉 posted on 2020/03/09
Video vocabulary