Placeholder Image

Subtitles section Play video

  • Every organization has the opportunity to have defining

  • moments. And oftentimes there fun and exciting. Sometimes they

  • are hard and scary.

  • I think we have a combination of that happening right now.

  • As all of you know, we are beginning to see real evidence

  • that COVID-19, the Novel Coronavirus, has taken root in

  • the United States. An activity is heating up here in Utah.

  • We, as an organization are

  • really ready. To take care of these patients and take care of

  • our communities by the opportunity with Sue Roble

  • yesterday to go to the EP you down to Intermountain Medical

  • Center and boy was I proud of the work that I saw being done

  • down there. Highly motivated caregivers, smart, thoughtful on

  • point selfless. And really eager to serve each other and to serve

  • the patients in the community.

  • This is a fast moving, rapidly

  • evolving situation. And we don't know all the answers yet, but

  • what we do know is we're always going to put our patients 1st

  • and we're always going to put

  • our caregivers 1st. And that we're going to do absolutely

  • everything we can to serve both of those groups as thoroughly

  • and thoughtfully as possible.

  • We're opening a dialogue with

  • you today. We are going to share with you the situation as it

  • exists right now and we're going to anticipate that we're going

  • to get an opportunity to speak with you on a regular basis over

  • the next weeks and months, because this is going to be a

  • marathon, not a Sprint.

  • I'm completely confident.

  • That whatever pops up Intermountain will have a

  • coordinated, thoughtful and team

  • oriented response. And even if tough things happen, we're

  • going to look for good to come from this so that we can

  • serve better in the future.

  • You're going to hear from Blair Kent now administrator

  • at Intermountain Medical Center who is going to bring

  • you up to speed on the operational implications of

  • what's going on right now and our preparedness. So Blair.

  • Thanks, Marc is everyone's aware we had our patient admitted last

  • Friday, but our preparation for that moment didn't start. Last

  • week we had almost 5 years of advanced preparation. We had

  • taken advantage many years ago. Intermountain was very

  • thoughtful and diligent in trying to create a vision of how

  • do we treat people that have unique situations conditions. So

  • as this. GPU is designed and built. There were guiding

  • principles that I still think are fundamental to who we are.

  • We were focused on safety of the patients or caregivers and

  • community and the capacity to provide quality care regardless

  • of this unique and freestanding unit. So about 4 years ago the

  • unit was completed. It was designed in an incredible way to

  • accommodate situations. Just like this, we were able to have

  • great physician leadership.

  • And clinical leadership with our nurses. So we've been able to

  • have physicians and nurses trained well in advance, so

  • Luckily, and strategically, that when we got the notification,

  • everyone sprung into action in a really fluid manner. Our

  • Engineering Department, who has had stewardship over the past 4

  • years, were able to immediately step in and the facility they've

  • been able to maintain over the past 4 years was readily

  • available. We were able to turn everything on and start getting

  • to go. In preparation for the receiving of this patient with

  • minor tweaks and minor changes, then immediately following that

  • we were able to mobilize all of the unique clinical aspects from

  • our nursing to pharmacy and having them come together to

  • physically be in this unit and start identifying what's it

  • going to look like and feel like when our patients here, what are

  • the handoffs? What are the things in the resources we need?

  • So over the course of that time, we're able to set that unit up

  • fairly quickly and thoroughly.

  • Our commitment, which we've been for years in doing our daily

  • safety huddles. We anticipated things really well physically.

  • We've had to tweak things, maybe little things here and there

  • from a communication standpoint, something as maybe insignificant

  • as a TV, the number of stations to how we communicate through

  • the glass, and then some things like food services. How do we

  • deliver, and where do we deliver the food? So overall it has been

  • a great success. The caregivers.

  • Are well trained, we are well stocked an supplied to do

  • exactly what we're doing. This isn't a unique challenge for us,

  • nor is it something that we're not prepared for. This has been

  • years in the preparing and planning and now we're doing

  • what we're trained to do. So the caregivers are excited. There is

  • an energy with the nurse. Is there an through our huddle

  • process? We're learning on a daily basis so the patients at

  • the right place with the right time with the right people and

  • at the right time.

  • So Doctor Phillips.

  • So as Blair said, we we've had a really great opportunity in a

  • very planned fashion to introduce our workforce in our

  • health system to COVID-19. And the situation is changing very,

  • very fast. We're learning kind of on the fly as information

  • comes in, both from the Centers for Disease Control and

  • Prevention, and from the Utah Department of Health. And so

  • they're updating guidance.

  • Clinical standards an we are keeping pace with them to be

  • sure that the practice that we have in our heads in our ICU's,

  • across our system wherever a patient comes, we're ready to

  • provide what is the standard today. I'll also share with you

  • that the standard today may not be the standard tomorrow or 2

  • days from now. We're learning. If you've kept an eye on the

  • news, it's an hour goes by or 7:00 o'clock. Tonight will know

  • something different an.

  • We're really doing our best to keep pace with that. what I

  • would like you all to know is that are your leaders. Your

  • managers are putting your safety as a caregiver 1st.

  • We're carrying about you so that you can care for our patients

  • for your families and your

  • communities. Interesting Lee. Initially we as you've probably

  • seen in the news, we've been able to identify risk and we'll

  • talk about that others here in a moment through where you've been

  • right. Where's your travel? Where have you been in China?

  • Have you been in Italy? And what we're finding over the weekend,

  • for example, is that that's only getting us part of the way

  • there, right? So, as we've seen, what's happened in Washington

  • state and an each day? I think we'll see something different.

  • So travel history is helping us, but it's probably that's

  • probably not going to.

  • Last, for very long we're going to find ourselves with direct

  • community spread and that some of what we're seeing in

  • Washington state now. And that's going to make it a little harder

  • to know who's at risk and so bear with us. We're going to

  • give you every guidance that is available to us, and we're going

  • to kind of take a ride here that the country hasn't been through

  • in the world hasn't been through

  • in awhile. We are learning were learning organization. We are

  • caring for you and our patients and as the guidance changes were

  • present for you, please know that we have a website that's

  • available internally as well. the CDC an the Utah Department

  • of Health have sites for you to go out an care for yourself as

  • well as we're going to update for you as caregivers. What we

  • know in the moment and so please use that and the communications

  • team is going to stay all over

  • this. And as Marc said, this will be a continuing dialogue,

  • both with things like this as well as written material that

  • will have available for you. So we're informed were staying

  • connected so that we can help you serve our patients. I'm

  • going to turn it over to Eddie Stenehjem so he can share a

  • little bit about how we can be members of the community and

  • what we need to do.

  • Thanks, Shannon, thank you all for being here. As we know COVID-19

  • is caused by a coronavirus in coronavirus causes the

  • common cold we've all had coronaviruses in this room and the

  • good news is we know a lot about the science of coronaviruses,

  • but this is a new coronavirus. It's novel and we're learning

  • everyday about the transmission of this virus. We will learn

  • more in the weeks and days that come as test become available as

  • we start testing our community and communities in Washington,

  • Oregon. Start testing more

  • broadly. And we will be able to give that information to you

  • into our caregivers and to our patients and communities. Right

  • now, there is no treatment, aside from supportive care for

  • this infection. Fortunately, the vast majority of people that get

  • this infection do quite well. We want to ensure that we can care

  • for those patients, though that don't do well. Vaccine studies

  • are currently on going and enrolling. In addition to

  • treatment studies for randomized control trials are certainly on

  • going as well. Intermountain will be involved as we can in

  • those and keep you updated.

  • On current treatments that we

  • can provide. Like cold and flu viruses, this virus transmits on

  • droplets infected droplets that are generated when week off and

  • we sneeze the way people become infected is those droplets are

  • directly inserted to somebody's eyes, nose or mouth during a

  • cough or sneeze. Otherwise they can cough and it can land on an

  • inanimate object. A counter or a kitchen appliance and

  • then we can touch that and then we take that and we put it into

  • our face and we can get infected that way. So there's many ways

  • we can prevent community transmission. Simple things that

  • we can do, not only in our

  • hospitals. But also in our communities the first and

  • foremost is easy it's hand washing we want to ensure that

  • we are washing our hands consistently and so when we

  • touch those infected areas we're disinfecting our hands by hand

  • washing and you will see all the leaders be doing that routinely

  • and this is the new normal to be doing this often In addition we

  • want to avoid touching our face it's easy to say but very hard

  • to do but avoid touching ones eyes nose and mouth to really

  • decrease that transmission of the more common things that are

  • happening right now in Utah

  • which include. Influenza.

  • We wanted to make sure that people that when they are sick

  • and coughing and sneezing were coughing into our elbow were

  • coughing into a tissue we're avoiding infecting our

  • environment as much as we can.

  • We also want to make sure we clean frequently in the

  • environment using disinfectants not only in our home but also at

  • our workplace and in acute care settings as well you may have

  • seen some coverage about a shortage of masks in different

  • environments in different communities right now in Utah

  • and definitely within Intermountain we do not have a

  • shortage of masks we have them aplenty but keep in mind we

  • don't recommend wearing masks in the community we are not at that

  • point yet in fact there is some recent data suggests that

  • there's potentially higher risk for people that wear masks.

  • If you're touching them and ask masks and manipulating the

  • massacre also touching your face so we don't recommend that at

  • this time? In addition as a precautionary method we would

  • recommend using non handshake methods to greet one another we

  • can do fist bumps we can do elbow smashes or we can just

  • greet each other with a simple hello it's a precautionary

  • method but that's a completely acceptable here within

  • Intermountain as leaders and

  • also as caregivers. Bottom line is we're here to protect

  • the community or caregivers in our patients and we will keep

  • you updated as we go turn it over to Rebecca.

  • Thanks Eddie so there's some things that each of us can do

  • right now to make sure that we're ready for what's coming

  • our way the first thing is we should be prepared at home so

  • keep basic supplies like food your medicines vitamins

  • essential items on stock at home be ready for that Additionally

  • we want to make sure that everyone in your family and your

  • relatives who live with you know how do things like wash your

  • hands well wash them appropriately keep your avoid

  • touching your face many of the things that Eddie just shared

  • with us today. Are the same things that our family and our

  • children also need to be aware

  • of? On Top of that many of us have questions about what to do

  • if you feel sick.

  • So the first thing is that it's winter flu season and there's

  • many respiratory illnesses that are common available at this

  • time and in our community so if you were feeling ill please make

  • sure that you stay home from work so that you can care for

  • yourself. If you have questions or you have concerns about Cove

  • in 19 app here are the steps that you should take so the

  • first one is please go to Intermountain web page the

  • website that is set up right now is being updated multiple times

  • per day and you should be able to get many of your questions

  • answered there if you're not finding the answers to your

  • questions and you think you might need care it's very

  • important that you call first before going to a site for care?

  • You can start by calling your primary care provider or you can

  • call health answers. If you think you have significant

  • symptoms and you're afraid or you're concerned that you may