Placeholder Image

Subtitles section Play video

  • Hi, I'm Rebecca from www.engvid.com . Do you sometimes feel that you're stuck at a certain

  • level when you're trying to speak at a meeting or at an interview or with a client?

  • Well, that can happen for many reasons and one of the reasons is that, lots of times,

  • people have a lot of nouns in their vocabulary, okay, like success or opportunity, but you

  • don't necessarily have strong adjectives.

  • So, in this lesson, I'm going to focus on some strong business collocations, or business

  • expressions that you can learn and use so that you can sound much more advanced and

  • professional in a business context, okay?

  • So, this is one of our continuing lessons in the "Speak like a Manager" series.

  • So, whether you're already a manager or you aspire to be a manager, you would like to

  • be a manager, these expressions can help you to sound much more effective, okay?

  • So, let's see what they are, and they're really quite easy.

  • They're easy because I've divided them into two categories.

  • The ones at the top all refer to something which is very good or very big, and the ones

  • down here all refer to something very bad but also very big, okay?

  • So, this is something bad and big, and this is something good and big, so all of these

  • adjectives that you're going to learn refer to those points, okay?

  • So, let's see what they are.

  • Now, along with understanding the meaning, I want you to try to say it after me, okay,

  • so that your pronunciation is also accurate and correct and understandable in a business

  • context.

  • Alright, so suppose you want to say that something is a success, okay?

  • You know the word success, you could say it's a very big success, or it was a very good

  • success, okay, you wouldn't say that - it was a big success.

  • But what can you say instead of saying "a big success"?

  • You can say it was a resounding success.

  • Repeat after me: it was a resounding success.

  • Resounding means very big, gigantic, enormous, okay?

  • But this an expression that is used together.

  • These two words are often used together.

  • When two words are used together like that, it's called a collocation in English.

  • It means that people expect to hear these two words together, okay?

  • And it makes sense to them when you use that expression.

  • Right away, they get it, they understand, and they also understand that your English

  • is pretty good, okay?

  • Alright.

  • So, a resounding success means a big success.

  • Now, let's say you're talking about an opportunity, and again, you want to say it was a very good

  • opportunity, but instead of just saying "very good" or "very big", you can say it was a

  • golden opportunity.

  • Say it after me: a golden opportunity.

  • So again, golden, you can understand, it means like beautiful, fantastic, amazing, beautiful,

  • right?

  • So, it was a golden opportunity, okay?

  • A great opportunity.

  • A very good opportunity, alright?

  • Now, suppose you're talking about a choice that somebody made, okay.

  • They made a choice, they made a decision, alright, and you can say - you want to say

  • it was a very good choice or a very good decision.

  • So, instead of saying "very good", you can say you made a wise choice.

  • Say it after me: You made a wise choice.

  • Good.

  • Alright?

  • "Wise" meaning very smart, very intelligent, okay?

  • It's a little bit more than just saying "very good", so you're also communicating better

  • ideas, higher level ideas, deeper ideas, okay?

  • Next, so suppose you want to say that somebody gave you really good advice.

  • So, instead of saying "very good advice" or "really good advice", you can say "My parents

  • always gave me sound advice.", okay, or my manager gave me sound advice.

  • Now, that might sound a little strange to you because sound - isn't that about things

  • we hear, sound?

  • Yes, that's a very common meaning of the word "sound", but sound can also mean very strong,

  • very good, very solid, okay?

  • And therefore, instead of saying "very good advice", you can say they gave me sound advice.

  • My professor in university gave me sound advice about how to develop my career, okay?

  • Or the campaign was a resounding success.

  • Getting this job was a golden opportunity, okay?

  • He made a wise choice to continue his education.

  • And, someone gave you sound advice.

  • Again, all of those are positive words and all of these expressions are positive, meaning

  • very good or very big.

  • Now, let's look at some negative expressions, okay?

  • Because sometimes that happens too in life.

  • Okay, so again here, all of these refer to something that's either very bad or very big,

  • okay?

  • So, instead of just saying it was a really big failure, you could use the higher-level

  • word: it was an abject failure, okay?

  • So, repeat it after me: abject failure.

  • It means very bad.

  • Very powerful.

  • Powerfully negative, okay?

  • Extremely poor, okay?

  • So, abject failure.

  • It was a huge failure, alright?

  • So, that's one expression you can use.

  • Another one: you want to say there was a very big loss.

  • The company made a mistake and they experienced a very big loss.

  • Instead of saying very big or very bad, you can say a huge loss.

  • Repeat it after me: a huge loss.

  • And not just - don't just repeat it for the pronunciation, you can also repeat it to learn

  • intonation, because we express certain ideas in certain ways, right?

  • And you can learn to do that.

  • Don't just say "It was a huge loss.".

  • No, because there's no emotion there, and this is an emotional kind of subject, right?

  • So, you want to put some emotion and intonation into it.

  • So, it was huge loss.

  • Got it?

  • Good.

  • Here, now suppose you said that somebody was in big trouble.

  • So, instead of saying "big trouble", you could say they were in deep trouble, alright?

  • This is another business collocation, "in deep trouble", alright?

  • Repeat it after me: deep trouble.

  • Good.

  • And another word that we hear very often in the business context is criticism.

  • Criticism is the opposite of praise.

  • Criticism is when someone, usually makes negative comments, okay?

  • You can have positive criticism, but usually criticism is a little more negative, okay?

  • So, here, in this case, the person received very negative or very bad comments or criticism,

  • okay?

  • And therefore, you could use the expression "harsh criticism".

  • Say it after me: harsh criticism.

  • That's a little bit tricky, that word.

  • Harsh.

  • Harsh.

  • Okay?

  • So, there's a "shh" sound at the end, and make sure you're saying the endings of those

  • words, okay?

  • If you say "har criticism" and you're trying to say it too fast, people won't understand,

  • okay?

  • So, with all of these adjectives, make sure that you're saying the endings correctly and

  • fully, so that people can appreciate and understand this higher-level vocabulary that you're using.

  • So now, when we come back, you're going to use these expressions in some actual sentences,

  • okay?

  • Be right back.

  • Alright, so now let's try them out.

  • Now remember, you can do this in two ways, okay?

  • So the first is that you could just pause the video, alright, and then I'll stand here,

  • pause the video, and work these out, write it down on a piece of paper, write down the

  • answers before I start to go through them, or just stay with me and go through them,

  • okay?

  • So, what we're going to do is I'm going to read the sentence and whatever is in blue

  • is where you have to replace it with one of the expressions that we learned.

  • For example, number one: They had a very bad loss in sales.

  • Okay?

  • So instead of saying "very bad loss" or "very big loss", which one of these words do we

  • use?

  • Do you remember the expression?

  • Okay?

  • Is it something positive or negative?

  • I have the positive words written for you at the bottom, and the negative words written

  • for you down here, but do you remember the expression for very big loss, or very bad

  • loss?

  • It is a huge loss, okay?

  • So, they had a huge loss, okay?

  • Then you don't have to say "very", because huge already means very big, okay?

  • They had a huge loss in sales, alright.

  • Number two: She has a very good opportunity to join a consulting firm.

  • Alright?

  • So, what's that?

  • She has a very good opportunity to join a consulting firm, that's something positive,

  • right?

  • So, we can say she has a golden opportunity.

  • Very good, okay, I hope you got that.

  • So just sort of say them to yourself: golden opportunity.

  • Or I should say: a golden opportunity.

  • A huge loss, okay?

  • Good.

  • Number three: My supervisor gave me very good advice.

  • So, what's that?

  • Instead of saying "very good advice", what's the expression we can use?

  • My supervisor gave me sound advice, okay?

  • It's down here, it's among the positive, okay?

  • Sound advice means very good, strong advice.

  • Solid advice, okay?

  • Alright.

  • Number four: Their law firm is in very big trouble.

  • That's something negative, it's going to be one of the words down here, so what do we

  • say?

  • What's that business collocation for very big trouble?

  • It is deep trouble, okay?

  • Their law firm is in deep trouble.

  • Very good, okay?

  • Are you with me?

  • Good.

  • Number five: Completing your MBA was a very good choice.

  • Alright?

  • So, what can we say instead of "very good choice"?

  • A better expression is a wise choice.

  • Good.

  • Okay?

  • That's down here, okay, instead of "very good choice", a "wise choice".

  • Next, number six: The new policy was a very big failure.

  • So, which strong word can we use to describe something that's extremely poor, extremely

  • bad?

  • What's that word?

  • Abject, okay?

  • This one.

  • Not "object", but "abject", okay?

  • There's an A there, there's a short A sound when we say the word: abject, okay?

  • Don't be afraid to open your mouth, say abject.

  • It was an abject failure, okay?

  • So, that's over here, alright?

  • Abject.

  • Number seven: Our sales campaign was a very big success.

  • This is good news, right?

  • Your sales campaign was a very big success.

  • However, you want to express yourself more effectively than that, more powerfully than

  • that, so you're going to use the expression not "very big success" but which word?

  • A resounding success, okay?

  • Now remember, when you're saying this word, even though it's written with an S, that S

  • as a Z sound.

  • "rezounding".

  • Say it after me: resounding success.

  • Good.

  • Alright, now you're not only using the right word, but you sound correct, alright?

  • Good.

  • Number eight: The General Manager, GM, the General Manager received very bad criticism

  • for his comments.

  • Okay?

  • So, what's "very bad criticism", which expression could we use?

  • We could say, the one that's left, which is here: harsh.

  • The General Manager received harsh criticism, okay?

  • Very good.

  • I hope you got those and if not, don't worry, you know, take the - backtrack with the video,

  • stop, pause it, try to work them out by yourself, alright?

  • You can do it, I know you can, and the reason that I marked these is because I wanted to

  • tell you something about these three.

  • So, these words, right, advice, trouble, and criticism, so these are called non-count nouns.

  • So, you might have noticed that we didn't say "a", or "an advice", or "a trouble", or

  • "a criticism".

  • No, we cannot say that because we cannot count these nouns, right?

  • So, when you cannot count a noun, you don't need to put the article "a" before that, but

  • with the other ones, like "an opportunity", "a loss", there we can count them, so we did

  • have to add the article "a" before them, but with these, we didn't.

  • We just said, "sound advice", "deep trouble", "harsh criticism", okay, and there was no

  • need for any article before that.

  • Alright, you've got it!

  • So, what's another way to make sure that you've got it?

  • So, first of all, go to our website www.engvid.com , do the quiz over there just to review and

  • make sure that you really can remember these expressions, know how to write them, know

  • how to spell them, know how to pronounce them, know how to use them, okay?

  • That's one way.

  • Another thing you can do is leave me a comment on engVid, on YouTube.

  • Leave a comment, choose one of these expressions, and tell me about something in your life that

  • was a resounding success or - not the negative things - tell me about a time when you received

  • sound advice, okay?

  • Let's stay positive, alright?