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  • So, we got to hold on to what we got.

  • It doesn't make a difference if we...

  • E, what are you doing?

  • Want to fill me in?

  • Oh, thanks: Today's lesson.

  • Hi. James from engVid.

  • Today's lesson is on "fill", a common verb that we use in English and has many different

  • meanings when we put it with prepositions.

  • In other words, this lesson that I'm going to fill you in on is on phrasal verbs with

  • "fill".

  • Okay?

  • I'm going to use three prepositions to show you the different ways we use it, and give

  • you, you know, the bonus and that a little bit later on.

  • Let's go to the board.

  • So: "Fill in the blank" is the first one.

  • Some of you, if you've been to English-speaking countries, have heard this before; maybe not.

  • But let's look: What does the word "fill" mean?

  • First of all, it's a verb, and it means to put somebody or something in a space, a situation,

  • or a container so it is completely or almost completely full.

  • So, an example is: If you were to have a cup of coffee and you said: "Fill it up", they

  • would take the coffee from here and put it in this space or container, and make it go

  • up.

  • Okay?

  • Cool.

  • Let's go to the board and see what else we can do.

  • I'm going to start with "up".

  • "Up" is a direction, and it means to increase.

  • Right?

  • So when someone, for instance, says: "Fill up"-in this case: "Fill up my car"-it means

  • make it completely full.

  • If you are going on a long journey or destination and you are taking your car with you, you

  • might want to fill up the gas.

  • In this case, make it full.

  • Right?

  • Now, "fill up" also could be for food.

  • "I don't want to fill up on French fries before I get my salad", that means be completely

  • full.

  • Right?

  • "I'm going to fill up my schedule for next week", make it completely full.

  • Now, another one with "up" is to "fill up on".

  • It means to have as much of something, as much of something as possible.

  • The example I gave you with French fries: "I need to fill up on fruits today; I didn't

  • have enough yesterday."

  • That means to have one thing and be completely full of it.

  • Cool?

  • All right.

  • So, we could say: "We need to fill up on groceries before we go on vacation", completely, right?

  • Get as much as possible of this thing.

  • The next one we'll do is "out": "fill out".

  • "Fill out" can be complete the needed information.

  • When you go to the government and you have to do a form, and they say: "Please fill this

  • out", they will give you a piece of paper and there will be places where you might have

  • to put your name, your address, and all sorts of information that they require in order

  • to help you.

  • So: "Fill that out, please."

  • When you go to the doctors the first time, usually they say: "Please fill out this form",

  • and you put down all of your information.

  • So, "to fill out" means to completely put in...

  • Complete needed information for a form or paper.

  • Okay?

  • Another one for "fill out" is this: To grow or get larger.

  • When you're young, say you're a young boy, you're usually very small.

  • And when you become a man, we say you fill out; you get your muscles, you get bigger,

  • and you get stronger.

  • Also, when you go to the gym, sometimes you need...

  • You will fill out.

  • You will go to the gym for one month, two months, three months - nothing happens.

  • And then one day, people will say: "You filled out.

  • Look at your big, wonderful muscles."

  • They've gotten bigger.

  • Cool?

  • So, in this case: Complete the form; and this one: To grow larger - we grow.

  • Cool?

  • Third one.

  • "Fill in".

  • Now, you will notice that "fill in" and "fill out" are similar for the first ones; complete

  • needed information and complete needed information.

  • In this case, when someone says: "Please fill in the form" they usually are referring to

  • the blanks, the empty spaces; while in "fill out", they mean the whole form.

  • Think of "larger", they want the big thing completed; while in "fill in", they're saying:

  • "Fill in each blank."

  • All right?

  • Next: "fill someone in".

  • To fill someone in is to give them information.

  • Let's say Mr. E went to a meeting.

  • Okay?

  • He went to a meeting last week and I wasn't there, and then I come back: "Oh, Mr. E, I

  • missed the meeting.

  • Can you fill me in; tell me what happened?"

  • He'll go: "Okay.

  • First what happened is Bob over there, he had some coffee, got a little too high off

  • the coffee.

  • You know what I'm saying?

  • Was really excited.

  • Really excited.

  • And then Janet, Janet, you know, from dah-dah-dah", he will fill me in; give me information.

  • That's not the same as fill out a form.

  • "To fill someone in" means they don't have information, you go and speak to them and

  • let them know what was going on.

  • "Fill me in.

  • Let me know."

  • Okay?

  • "Fill in for someone", this is to act as a substitute.

  • It doesn't always have to be a person.

  • Let's just say, for example, Tommy is sick.

  • "I can't work.

  • Can someone fill in for me?"

  • I need a substitute or replacement.

  • I need someone who can come and work for me.

  • Yeah?

  • Okay?

  • So: "I need a fill-in for tomorrow because I won't be here."

  • Or: "Can you fill in for John?

  • He's sick today."

  • You can also use something: "to fill in for".

  • We don't have this coffee anymore.

  • We can use this coffee to fill in instead, as a substitute or a replacement.

  • And the last one for "fill in" I have for you is: "fill in", and that's to complete

  • something.

  • All right?

  • So when we say: "I need to fill in a hole in the wall", for example...

  • Let's just say there's a crack right here...

  • Okay, and there's a hole.

  • Well, I need to fill that in, so I'm going to get some glue or some paper, and I'm going

  • to fill it in, so now the crack is filled in and complete; there's no more hole.

  • Right?

  • If you shave your eyebrow by accident, you need to fill it in with some pen and paper.

  • Don't do it; it's not good.

  • It's not a good look.

  • Okay?

  • Anyway, so you can fill in an eyebrow.

  • Some ladies do that.

  • They cut too much hair off their eyebrow, and they fill it in with mascara or something,

  • I don't know.

  • Right?

  • Or when you're fixing your house, you need to fill in the holes; complete.

  • Cool?

  • All right.

  • So, I filled you in with today's lesson.

  • I think it's time for us to...

  • You might be...

  • Go...

  • Have your fill of this...

  • And get ready for the quiz and bonus.

  • Are you ready?

  • [Snaps]

  • And now to my favourite part: Let's fill you in on the bonus, the homework, and the quiz.

  • All right, so bonus for this one is I'm going to give you an idiom and a word...

  • Actually probably two idioms and a word for you that use "fill".

  • If you remember at the beginning, I told you "fill" means to put something into something

  • else to make it full or, you know...

  • Or completed.

  • That's what these idioms have to do with.

  • Okay?

  • The first one, for instance: "You'll have your fill of something", "You have your fill

  • of something", or "Have your fill of something".

  • It means you don't want any more.

  • Example: somebody is talking to you about things you don't want to hear, you've had

  • your fill: "Enough.

  • Stop talking.

  • I don't want to hear you anymore."

  • Or if you've had too much beer, and you go: "Oh, I've had my fill of beer for the evening.

  • No more, please.

  • I don't want anymore", because it means to be almost completely full, that there is no

  • room for anymore.

  • Cool?

  • So, if you have your fill of something...

  • "I've had my fill of bad news for today.

  • Don't tell me anymore bad news.

  • I'm done.

  • Finished", "I've had my fill of this conversation.

  • It's now finished."

  • Cool?

  • All right.

  • Number two: "a filling".

  • I have beautiful teeth, as you know; however, I do have a filling back here.

  • That means my tooth...

  • I ate too much chocolate, it went bad, and the dentist had to fix it and put something

  • in there.

  • Do you remember when I talked about filling in a crack if there's a hole?

  • Well, when you get a filling, it means there is a hole in your tooth and they have to put

  • something in.

  • Sometimes it's material or some people have gold, some people have porcelain, but they

  • fill the hole in your tooth so you don't have more problems, or

  • any more problems.

  • "Fill your face".

  • Cookie Monster.

  • It means to put food in your mouth, a lot at one time.

  • "I need to fill my face."

  • Sometimes you might look like an animal when you fill your face.

  • Right?

  • So that's for eating a lot of food at once.

  • Cool?

  • Let's go to the board, yeah, yeah, yeah.

  • Okay, so the first one we're going to do is, on our little quiz:

  • "Mr. E asked James to __________ for him at work because he was sick."

  • Now, this is from the first part of the lesson.

  • What did James do for Mr. E?

  • That's right: "fill in".

  • Remember?

  • "Fill in" means to be a substitute for someone or something.

  • The next one: "James likes to __________"-and it means to

  • eat a lot at one time-"with chocolate bars".

  • This one is a very difficult one.

  • Look over here, look over here.

  • That's right: "fill your face".

  • "James likes to fill his face".

  • Sometimes I have two or three at the same time.

  • Now, next one: "If you take your car on a long trip, you

  • should __________ the gas tank."

  • You should what the gas tank?

  • Oh, I know when I go to the gas tank or a gas station, say: "Fill up.

  • Fill up the gas tank.

  • Put gas in there.

  • Fill up the gas tank."

  • Number four: "After three months of going to the gym, her

  • muscles are really starting __________." ...to grow.

  • What's another word for "grow"?

  • Muscles.

  • Remember we talked about "fill out"?

  • Her muscles are filling out, getting bigger.

  • "Fill out" means to get larger.

  • And what is the last one we're going to do?

  • "I went to the dentist last week and I had to get two __________."

  • Two what?

  • This is a noun.

  • So it's not quite a phrasal verb, and we talked about it earlier, so which one is a noun?

  • That's right.

  • Remember we talked about the hole in the tooth?

  • "Fillings".

  • If you have two fillings, you have two holes that need to be fixed in order that you don't

  • get sick, because if you don't get tooth decay-that's a hole in your tooth fixed-you can actually

  • get very, very sick.

  • Now, hope you enjoyed the lesson.

  • I wonder how you did out of the five.

  • As you know...

  • Well, I'm going to tell you where to in a second or two, but before I do, I want to

  • make sure you do your homework for the week.

  • This week's homework: I gave you one, two, three, probably 10, 11 variations of using

  • the word "fill" from using it as a phrasal verb, a couple of idioms, and one noun.

  • I would like you today to take five of them and use it, or use one five times.

  • Try and use what you've learned at least five times today, after you hit that video.