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  • - [Tammi] One of Tennessee's best

  • agricultural secrets, hemp.

  • And today we're in Springfield

  • talking with Bill Corbin, who grows loads of hemp.

  • Bill, glad to meet you.

  • - Well thank you, it's a pleasure to meet you.

  • - Tell us what got you started in this unique product.

  • - [Bill] Four years ago when they started the pilot program,

  • I wanted to be involved early on.

  • I was looking for alterative cropping.

  • The margins in traditional agriculture,

  • whether that be typical grain varieties for this area,

  • tobacco, cattle, the margins are so narrow,

  • I think the agricultural community needs to evolve,

  • look for other avenues to try to concentrate

  • more profits with fewer acres.

  • - [Tammy] So Bill,

  • tell us about the type of hemp that you grow.

  • - There are three different varieties in this field.

  • This for instance is a variety called Cherry Tang.

  • And these varieties all are specific for extraction.

  • The CBD values are exceptionally high in some of these,

  • they don't have the growth structure

  • to satisfy the fiber industry,

  • so this is specifically for extraction.

  • - And when you say extraction,

  • you're talking about the oil

  • that's contained within the flower of the plant?

  • - I am, yes.

  • - Okay, so what you want it to do,

  • it's got obviously lots of buds here,

  • is this the beginning of a bud?

  • - [Bill] It is, it's starting to develop.

  • A lot of this fan leaf, as it matures and loads flower

  • this will become a lot larger,

  • much, much more dense, and exceptionally heavy.

  • A lot of this fan leaf material, it's called cleaning,

  • a lot of this will dry up and waste away,

  • removing a lot of the, I guess you'd say extra biomass,

  • where you're left with more of a concentration

  • of your bud material.

  • - [Tammy] So this plant blooms all the way up the stem,

  • not just on the tip here, it blooms all over the plant.

  • - It does, quite a distance down,

  • of course you have horizontal growth from that

  • where you're building flower also.

  • We work specifically with clones,

  • and it is by far the most expensive route you can take

  • in trying to produce a field,

  • but we have to make sure

  • that the consistency of the whole field

  • is as close to identical as possible,

  • the only way we can do that is from cloning.

  • Anything from seed, the genetics are not stable,

  • there are so many anomalies and variations that can happen,

  • and where you have tests on a seed type

  • that shows a very, very good profile, as far as CBD value,

  • and your Delta 9 value of the THC composite,

  • there might be plants that deviate from that norm,

  • and when the state comes in and they test that,

  • that crop is gonna be destroyed,

  • so to guard against that,

  • and have a very, very consistent marketable flower,

  • we work through cloning only.

  • - So tell me when you harvest this,

  • because I'm seeing a plant

  • with all different stages of flower development,

  • how do you harvest it?

  • - What we'll do is, we'll come in here, a lot like tobacco,

  • and we'll take sheers and we'll cut this entire plant.

  • Now, depending on how big this is at the time

  • it could be that we're gonna have to section this,

  • to handle, instead of being able to take care of

  • the entire plant at one time,

  • and we spike it on tobacco sticks and air dry it,

  • we're putting frames in the greenhouses,

  • we'll house in there,

  • every barn that we're taking down and stripping out tobacco,

  • every one of those barns will be double-cropped,

  • refilled with hemp,

  • we're right on the verge of building

  • a very large structure over here specifically for hemp.

  • Drying, and having the capacity, the room,

  • this occupies, it needs so much more room,

  • because, obviously you can see how bulky this is,

  • to properly dry and not have the mold issues

  • that can go along with it,

  • requires an incredible amount of space.

  • - [Tammy] What are some of your challenges in growing hemp?

  • - Weed infestation and insect damage.

  • There are no chemical remedies,

  • either pre or post emergence, that are labeled for this,

  • there are some bacterial teas

  • and things that we can grow ourselves and then have applied,

  • that gets into a whole different area

  • that a lot of larger growers

  • are gonna have to address this next year.

  • Some corn borer worms in this crop,

  • there's not a thing we can do about it,

  • except try to weather the storm,

  • but that can be devastating as far as damage goes.

  • This variety works incredibly well in the New York State.

  • Another variety over here, a variety called Randi,

  • that will do exceptionally well in New York State.

  • Late Sue, which by far is our bread-and-butter,

  • does not, it has to stay in the field so, so long,

  • their growing season is too short,

  • so some of the things that we're doing,

  • and I have three other varieties

  • I'm gonna submit to TDA for approval,

  • will be hopefully this next year,

  • trialed on a smaller scale

  • to see what reacts better

  • in these growing conditions,

  • because all these genetics are coming from the breeder

  • that's part of our group in Colorado.

  • - So is Tennessee a good place to grow hemp?

  • - Tennessee is an excellent place to grow hemp,

  • we have a very good, long growing season,

  • and our soils are good, we generally have,

  • unlike most places, have enough natural rainfall,

  • where irrigation is not a necessity,

  • we have a lot of growers

  • that have the infrastructure that you need,

  • because we are, especially in the Middle Tennessee area,

  • South Central Kentucky, Western Kentucky,

  • a tobacco based economy so to speak,

  • and that means that we have the right infrastructure,

  • the right equipment, a ready labor force,

  • so yeah, it's an excellent place to grow hemp,

  • the profitability of this crop is better than tobacco,

  • I think people are gonna recognize that.

  • As far as production goes, we're gonna have to,

  • as a state, and Kentucky is moving faster than we are,

  • they've had some really, really good support

  • from the state government.

  • We, just like Kentucky,

  • have to have more of a whole plant mentality,

  • looking at trying to find varieties

  • that will fit more parts of the

  • emerging market,

  • than just chasing CBD.

  • - So you're in good shape Bill,

  • let's go see what's made from hemp.

  • So we've learned all about the flower

  • that Bill grows for his hemp,

  • but there's also producers that grow hemp

  • for a variety of other reasons.

  • And I'm here with Paige with the Hemp Association,

  • to show us how hemp is used in a lot of different products

  • that we use everyday.

  • Paige, tell us about hemp, let's start here

  • with this massive fiber that we've got here.

  • - Okay, so this is some fiber

  • that's typically used for industrial purposes,

  • this is some hemp building material,

  • formerly known as hempcrete or cellulosic insulation,

  • it's really great for eco

  • and environmentally friendly buildings.

  • Here's just some raw hemp seed with the hull still intact.

  • This is hemp seed cake,

  • so this is what is left whenever you press the seeds,

  • and is used for animal feed.

  • This right here is more of a textile grade hemp,

  • where it's a little bit softer, a little bit greener,

  • younger, so it doesn't have as much lignin content,

  • it creates really great soft, wearable fibers.

  • - [Tammy] Yes this feels so soft

  • and obviously you can use it in a lot of different forms,

  • so that's nice that it's just so durable.

  • - [Paige] Yes, it's been blended with silk, and denim,

  • as you can see, so it's very versatile.

  • And then we have some hemp 3D filaments,

  • so this is for 3D printing,

  • and here are some 3D printed items,

  • here's a hemp plastic cup,

  • so this is a bio composite that is made with hemp,

  • of course we have hemp string, so this is-

  • - [Tammy] So, that's what we normally think about

  • with hemp, is rope, and string,

  • and that type thing.

  • - Yes.

  • - [Tammy] And then, talk to us about the consumer products,

  • because this is where I think it's interesting,

  • tell us about these products here.

  • - Yeah, so these are primarily made with the hemp seed,

  • these are dehulled hemp seeds, often called hemp hearts,

  • and you can also make hemp protein,

  • which is primarily the hull of the hemp plant,

  • it has a good source of fiber, a great source of protein,

  • bioavailable, all of your 20 amino acids,

  • the hemp hearts themselves

  • have a perfect ratio of Omega-3 and 6 fatty acids,

  • so they're a great fish oil supplement replacement.

  • - And even in beverages,

  • so we've got coffee, soda, even milk.

  • - Yup, so they're using hemp to press milk with,

  • you can even find hemp ice cream, hemp yogurt,

  • the sodas are really great

  • and they're enriched with cannabinoids

  • which are from the flower,

  • but just an excellent source of nutrition,

  • from the hemp seed.

  • - And then obviously we've got beauty products as well,

  • so soaps, and creams,

  • and what part of the hemp plant is used in these?

  • - Yeah, so the soaps are primarily

  • made with the hemp seed oil,

  • so they provide really nourishing benefits

  • as far as extra moisturizing power,

  • the creams and the tinctures down here

  • are typically all made from the flower extract,

  • so you can find full spectrum extracts

  • or just isolate extracts.

  • The isolate is just gonna be your CBD or cannabidiol,

  • and all of these products right here are actually produced

  • right here in Tennessee, too.

  • - That's fantastic.

  • So obviously we've learned a lot about hemp today,

  • and we realize that hemp is really hip,

  • so Tennessee is on the cutting edge for hemp production,

  • and Paige, thanks for being with us.

  • (gentle upbeat music)

  • For inspiring garden tours, growing tips,

  • and garden projects, visit our website,

  • at VolunteerGardener.org,

  • or on YouTube, at the VolunteerGardener channel.

  • And like us on Facebook.

- [Tammi] One of Tennessee's best

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B2 US hemp tennessee tammy flower plant tobacco

Growing Hemp | Volunteer Gardener

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    Naphtali posted on 2019/12/22
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