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  • Welcome to the Department of Plagiarism Investigation.

  • The D.P.I. has dealt with numerous complex cases

  • in their effort to bring plagiarists to justice

  • and to rescue purloined texts.

  • The first form of plagiarism

  • that the D.P.I. regularly encounters

  • is known as brain child snatching,

  • in honor of the Latin word, plagiarius,

  • from which plagiarism originates.

  • Brain child snatchers sneak up on innocent papers

  • and copy and paste them

  • without citing any sources,

  • putting quotation marks around direct quotes

  • or changing a word.

  • They've also been known to steal and hold

  • particularly eloquent essays for ransom.

  • When brain child snatchers get together,

  • they form a kidnapping ring,

  • which involves brain child snatching

  • from multiple sources.

  • Some perpetrators have even been known

  • to commit self-plagiarism,

  • one of the laziest crimes in the annals of the D.P.I.

  • Also known as one-sided collaborators,

  • these odd balls snatch up entire texts

  • or small passages that they've written before

  • and present them as brand-new material.

  • Brain child snatchers and kidnapping rings

  • are easy for the D.P.I. to catch.

  • Just paste a few passages into a search engine,

  • and BAM!

  • They're caught red-handed.

  • The more covert forms of plagiarism

  • include the wild goose chase technique,

  • in which plagiarists create fake authors,

  • book titles,

  • page numbers,

  • or other information

  • in order to cover up plagiarism.

  • And the old synonym switcheroo

  • in which plagiarists utilize a thesaurus

  • as their main weapon.

  • By substituting a synonym

  • for nearly every word in the document

  • and leaving the sentence structure

  • and order of the ideas the same,

  • plagiarists give legitimate paraphrasing

  • a very bad name.

  • Shoddy paraphrasing is also a key part

  • of variations on a smokescreen,

  • a technique in which multiple passages

  • are paraphrased,

  • then pasted together into one.

  • The thorniest issue that the D.P.I. deals with

  • is the misconception

  • that you can never be accused of plagiarism

  • if you use quotes and cite your sources.

  • This is most certainly not the case

  • because a paper that is made up

  • of passage upon passage of other people's ideas

  • is known as a wholly quotable document.

  • This is considered plagiarism

  • since there are no original thoughts in the work.

  • Similarly, passage after passage

  • of too closely paraphrased text from multiple cited sources

  • is also plagiarism of the pervasively paraphrased kind

  • because the ideas still aren't one's own.

  • And lastly, the technique of revealing while concealing

  • is plagiarism because it involves selective amnesia

  • regarding one's sources

  • in an attempt to cover up wholly quotable

  • and pervasively paraphrased issues in a text.

  • Some passages are meticulously documented,

  • quoted,

  • or paraphrased,

  • while others are presented entirely as one's own.

  • As you can see, the D.P.I. has its hands full,

  • tackling all sorts of academic mischief and mayhem,

  • ranging from the petty to the outrageous.

  • Given the gravity of these transgressions,

  • you might be wondering why you've never heard

  • of the Department of Plagiarism Investigation's victories.

  • That's because it doesn't technically exist.

  • But people, like you and me, can be our own D.P.I. agents

  • to fight plagiarism

  • and uphold the values of original thinking.

  • We know that the best defense against plagiarism

  • consists of writers who save themselves

  • time, worry, and effort

  • by taking the far easier road

  • of just doing the work themselves.

Welcome to the Department of Plagiarism Investigation.

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B2 TED-Ed plagiarism passage brain child paraphrasing

【TED-Ed】The punishable perils of plagiarism - Melissa Huseman D'Annunzio

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    wikiHuang posted on 2013/11/25
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