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  • And indeed, things were extremely interesting, but probably not for the reasons everyone

  • would have liked.

  • We'll get back to those reasons later, there's a lot I want to say on that topic, but for

  • now: Worlds 2007!

  • Much like Worlds 2005, the first talk of Worlds 2007 was less than a month after the previous

  • worlds had ended.

  • Chris Hardwick posted on the Yahoo!

  • Speedsolving group, asking people about their goals for 2007.

  • Not too many people were talking about where they wanted it to be, but the few who were

  • overwhelmingly preferred somewhere in Europe.

  • It makes sense if you think about it; it's a world championship, so it can't be in North

  • America all the time, and Europe had a very well-developed cubing scene.

  • South America would eventually have a large enough community to justify holding Worlds

  • there, as would Asia, but at the time?

  • Europe was it.

  • I mean, imagine holding it somewhere like Australia, that would be a disaster...

  • Anyway.

  • In September 2006, Chris made another post on Yahoo!, and all but confirmed the rumours:

  • Worlds 2007 would be held in Budapest, Hungary.

  • A fitting place, being the birthplace of the cube, and the 25th anniversary of the 1982

  • World Championship in Budapest.

  • On the 12th of January, 2007, this was officially confirmed: Worlds 2007 would be held over

  • October 5th to October 7th, 2007, at the Budapest Congress & World Trade Centre, right next

  • to the Novotel Budapest Congress hotel.

  • By March 9, registrations had officially opened, and 214 competitors from 32 countries would

  • be signed up by the time registration closed - the largest competition in the history of

  • the WCA at the time.

  • Two newsletters would be sent out, including an interview with the executive manager of

  • Rubik's Studio, Janos Kovacs, as well as a competitor pack explaining what was where

  • and preparations that needed to be made.

  • A minor competition for the Rubik's Revolution was also announced, with a 1000 euro cash

  • prize.

  • Much like 2005, there was a debate between the WCA and Seven Towns on whether or not

  • non-Rubik's brands would be allowed.

  • The WCA was pushing to allow them, while Seven Towns was dead against it; however, they suggested

  • that no future competitions would have this limitation.

  • Various misunderstandings made some people believe that the WCA was actually of the opinion

  • that non-Rubik's brand cubes should be banned; however, on the 2nd of May 2007, Ron van Bruchem

  • announced the good news.

  • Except for 3x3, non-Rubik's brand cubes would be allowed for all events.

  • Eastsheen cubes would finally get a turn in the spotlight at a world championship.

  • It's unknown if the limitation on 3x3 was removed, however.

  • A couple weeks before Worlds, there were threads on the Speedsolving forum about who would

  • win.

  • A poll went up, and many messages followed, debating who would win.

  • One thing was for sure: it would definitely be someone with a top 10 average.

  • It didn't seem feasible that anyone else could take the crown.

  • The question was... who?

  • In the end it wouldn't be any of them for first place, or even second place.

  • Third place was won by Mitsuki Gunji, with a 13.05 average.

  • Second place was won by Andrew Kang, also with a 13.05 average but with a slightly faster

  • single of 10.88.

  • The winner?

  • Yu Nakajima.

  • He came out of nowhere, only having been to one competition ever before where he achieved

  • 3rd place, and came out on top for the second round and the final, with a 12.46 average.

  • Barely anyone knew who he was beforehand, but afterwards?

  • He was unstoppable.

  • Later on he would get an 8.72 world record single twice in the same competition, as well

  • as an 11.28 world record average.

  • Is this the end of the Worlds 2007 story?

  • Ohhh no.

  • There is a *lot* of scandal and intrigue that has not been covered here.

  • For this we need to head to some different events.

  • Specifically, the blind events.

  • Specifically, a particular competitor in the blind events, Mátyás Kuti.

  • Kuti was a Hungarian cuber who seemed to be absolutely unstoppable in a tonne of events,

  • including blind.

  • He came first in a couple of non-blind events at Worlds, as well as three of the blind events:

  • 3BLD, 4BLD, and MBLD.

  • He also podiumed in several other events, and broke world record after world record

  • after world record.

  • He seemed to be unbelievably good in all events, blind especially.

  • Unbelievably good.

  • So much so, that some literally didn't believe it, and started poking around at some of Kuti's

  • videos.

  • After examining closely, they noticed various discrepancies in solves he had done.

  • Milan Baticz made a post on the Speedsolving forum, claiming that as he had stopped solving

  • for thirty straight seconds while the paper was under him in a particular solve - he had

  • never had any significant break before - this was proof that he was cheating.

  • This post was met with a lot of skepticism, and most people were on Kuti's side at this

  • point.

  • After significant gossip, the WCA began their own investigation.

  • It was detailed in a report that has never been made public, astyás was underage

  • at the time, so as a result, most of the evidence and information was just rumours, and not

  • actual fact.

  • There was a *lot* of fallout.

  • This was the first big scandal in the cubing community, and many people were in shock that

  • something like this could happen.

  • There was no precedent for a cuber being banned from competing before, and a lot of people

  • believed the investigation could have been carried out better as a result.

  • Quite a few people expressed feelings that three years was too long, and that it should

  • have been a shorter ban or otherwise less severe consequences.

  • Others were in disbelief that the cheating even took place, and were outraged at the

  • WCA for this, claiming that the investigation was significantly biased - although looking

  • at the report in hindsight, it's hard to say, honestly.

  • tyás' mother actually came onto the WCA forum thread, claiming violations of the UN

  • Declaration of Human Rights.

  • Honestly, the entire thing was a mess, and a good lesson

  • for the WCA in how to deal with an event like this in the future.

  • Regardless of the controversies, Worlds 2007 was considered

  • by many to be an excellent competition.

  • Cubing was growing at a steady pace, and there was no fear that Worlds 2009 would be hindered

  • by any serious organisational issues.

  • The only question was, where to have it...

And indeed, things were extremely interesting, but probably not for the reasons everyone

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The Biggest Scandal in Cubing History | WC2007

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    徐子博 posted on 2019/11/15
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