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  • [MUSIC PLAYING]

  • I'm youth activist Naomi Wadler.

  • Last year, I gave a speech at the March

  • for Our Lives rally in Washington, DC.

  • It is my privilege to be here today.

  • [CHEERING]

  • Since then, I've been on a mission to change the world one

  • conversation at a time.

  • [MUSIC PLAYING]

  • I sat down with Jameela Jamil and was blown away

  • by her courage to speak out.

  • As a young activist, she is definitely

  • somebody I aspire to be like.

  • Is it you?

  • Yes.

  • Is it you?

  • Hi.

  • Hello.

  • I'm such a big fan.

  • I read that you were bullied when you were younger,

  • and I wanted to know how you've grown

  • to overcome those challenges.

  • I was very, very badly bullied because I was not thin enough.

  • I was not light skinned enough.

  • And I didn't have any money.

  • And so I didn't really have any friends until I was about 19.

  • I was very, very lonely.

  • It's unbelievable how little children

  • are educated about the damage that bullying does

  • and how one statement can go on to form a person's

  • entire opinion of themselves for the rest of their lives

  • because it means so much when you're young.

  • But truly, the thing I've learned--

  • it's not about you.

  • It's about them.

  • You are such a success story.

  • Everything about you resonates with me.

  • This still happens to me now.

  • I still have women treat me like this sometimes.

  • And I've realized-- and it's taken me a long time

  • to realize-- that they're afraid of me.

  • Other girls are afraid of you.

  • It scares women when they see another woman sometimes-- not

  • all women.

  • It scares some people when they see

  • someone else of any gender being bold and outspoken because it

  • makes them feel bad about their own lack of freedom

  • and being able to do that same thing.

  • Yes.

  • So take it as a compliment, which is what I do.

  • I will.

  • I think if they have a problem with you,

  • you're doing something right.

  • Tell me about the 'I Weigh' movement.

  • What made you want to start this amazing community?

  • So I got Instagram and pressed on that evil little button

  • called explore.

  • And when I did, it opened me up to this world

  • of what it is that social media thinks

  • I should be looking at as a woman, which is thin,

  • Photoshopped supermodels, weight loss supplements, and pictures

  • of very successful female celebrities

  • with numbers written across their bodies.

  • So I assumed from far away that those numbers would be how much

  • money they'd earned, but it wasn't.

  • It was how much they weighed.

  • I was furious when I saw this, so I

  • wrote a post saying what I weigh, how I weigh myself now,

  • which is in my achievements, my attributes,

  • the contributions I've made society,

  • my bingo wings, which is the bit of fat

  • that I have that hangs off the back of my arm that I love.

  • I love it very much.

  • It creates a nice breeze when I'm feeling hot.

  • I put it out to the world just as a statement.

  • I didn't mean to start anything.

  • And it struck a chord.

  • And now, we have almost half a million followers,

  • all real people who send in thousands of posts

  • a week telling us what they weigh.

  • It's just so great to hear somebody

  • who I look up to speak so well.

  • The reason more women don't speak out-- we're

  • fear mongered about being seen as

  • unlikable or difficult or problematic or annoying.

  • Annoying is a word that gets used to silence women.

  • And so I think it's just very important

  • to not listen to that because that's just misogyny

  • and sexism.

  • The people who matter will like you.

  • And the people who don't like you don't matter.

  • Wow.

  • That was great.

  • On those days where I feel rubbish about myself,

  • I genuinely do have to write down

  • a list of everything I am that is

  • impressive and worthy of being in this world.

  • I make sure that I continue to return

  • to my list of what makes me an important person to the people

  • that I love.

  • Just because people who are advertising to you

  • don't care about your life, you need to.

  • You have to take back that power and that respect.

  • Me and my mom, we were just talking

  • about how I often don't feel that good about my body

  • and about myself in general.

  • That's so infuriating that you have

  • to be made to feel bad about the way that you look.

  • And aside from the way that you look,

  • you are such an impressive, important human being.

  • You are doing things that people 20 years older

  • than you, 30 years, 40 years older than you

  • don't have the guts to do.

  • It's ridiculous that you feel bad

  • about anything about yourself, least

  • of all your wonderful face and body.

  • Every time that you feel content with yourself

  • and you feel powerful and you feel

  • like you are good just as you are,

  • that is an act of feminist resistance.

  • And so I implore you to do that.

  • You are amazing, and what you're saying is amazing.

  • And it feels so good having somebody telling me

  • all of this.

  • Thank you.

  • I just wanted to give her a hug.

  • [INAUDIBLE] and I so know how you feel, and it's so rubbish.

  • But it will only make you stronger.

  • I loved talking to Jameela because she

  • inspired me to love myself.

  • I'm not all the way there, but with taking her words

  • and thinking about them more, I'm sure I can get there.

  • Time to recognize someone who exemplifies Cheerios'

  • generation good mission.

  • Makenzie is a 9-year-old and recently started a little free

  • pantry in her neighborhood that is open 24/7 to anyone

  • who needs it.

  • The pantry has been used over 1,000 times.

  • We salute you, Makenzie.

  • Thanks for chatting.

  • Let's keep the conversation going.

  • Time's up, which sprouted from such a terrible topic, really

  • brought us all together.

  • It made us realize that there were other women who were

  • going through similar things.

  • Yes.

  • When we recognize the sisterhood,

  • we are so much more effective.

  • [MUSIC PLAYING]

[MUSIC PLAYING]

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A2 UK TheEllenShow jameela weigh feel bad music playing naomi

DiversiTEA with Naomi Wadler Jameela Jamil on Bullying, and Body Positivity

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    meryem posted on 2019/08/25
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