Placeholder Image

Subtitles section Play video

  • - Hi, welcome back.

  • This is Jack from tofluency.com, along with me, Kate.

  • - Yeah, and today,

  • we are going to give you listening practice,

  • and we do this by just having

  • a natural conversation, in English.

  • And today our topic is going to be jobs.

  • - Yes.

  • - Jobs.

  • So be sure to check out the description

  • for the words and phrases that we use in this lesson.

  • And also check out tofluency.com,

  • because I have some great stuff there for you, too.

  • Okay, so today we're gonna talk about jobs.

  • We're gonna talk about the first jobs that we've had.

  • - Okay.

  • - Different types of jobs we've had.

  • And also, we're going to talk about our dream job.

  • So we can start thinking about that now.

  • But what was your first-ever job?

  • - So my first-ever job

  • was actually working at a sailing school.

  • So, eventually I became a sailing instructor

  • but in the beginning, I was just a helper,

  • so I would help move boats

  • and help people who wanted to rent the boats,

  • what to do and where to go.

  • So we rented kayaks and small sailboats

  • and small catamarans,

  • and that was the beginning of my working career.

  • - Very cool. - Yeah.

  • - How old were you?

  • - I was 15.

  • - Right.

  • Was that like a summer job?

  • - It was a summer job.

  • - And is that common around that age in America?

  • - I think that most, because we have a longer summer break

  • than a lot of other countries, I think it's pretty common

  • for American teenagers to have some kind of a summer job.

  • - Right.

  • So yours was working at a sailing school.

  • - Yes.

  • - But you didn't teach sailing at first.

  • - No.

  • - That came later. - That came later.

  • I had to work my way up to that.

  • And, well, of course, my very first job was as a babysitter.

  • - Yeah.

  • - Uh-huh, so I actually became certified to babysit,

  • and I babysat for our neighbor's children for several years.

  • - Yeah, growing up watching American movies,

  • that seemed quite a common thing, to babysit.

  • - Yes.

  • - And what age were you when you did that?

  • - I think that I got my certification when I was about 12,

  • so probably from the time that I was 12 until,

  • well, much later.

  • It was not a regular job, but every couple weekends or so,

  • I would do some babysitting.

  • - And before, did you know how to sail before

  • going to the sailing school?

  • - Yes.

  • So I actually started out as a student of the sailing school

  • which is how I learned to sail.

  • - Very cool, and I've been to that sailing school before.

  • - Yeah.

  • - Remember when you took me out on the, is it cata--

  • - Catamaran.

  • - Catamaran. - Yup.

  • - And I got soaked.

  • - You did. - Yeah.

  • - Did you like it?

  • - Oh, I loved it. - Yeah?

  • - Yeah.

  • You also took me sailing once in Athens, Georgia.

  • It was boiling.

  • - Yes. - That day.

  • But yeah, that's pretty cool.

  • And you were in sailing club, right?

  • - That's right.

  • - At university. - Uh-huh, yup.

  • - Or at college.

  • Very good, and how many summers

  • did you work at the sailing school?

  • - That's a great question.

  • I probably worked for four summers at the sailing school,

  • three or four.

  • - Cool.

  • Did you enjoy it?

  • - I loved it.

  • I still kind of miss it.

  • That's one thing that I think of

  • when the weather gets summery,

  • I think, "Oh, when am I gonna get out on the water?

  • "When am I gonna see my friends?"

  • (upbeat music)

  • Let me ask you a little bit about your first job.

  • - Okay.

  • - What was it?

  • - My first job was a paper round.

  • - [Kate] Okay.

  • - Do you call it paper route here?

  • - I think we would call it a paper round,

  • but it's a pretty uncommon job

  • for young people to have today.

  • - Right.

  • - I think that was something that people

  • older than our generation had.

  • - Right, well, yeah, it was very popular when I was younger.

  • We, my friend and I, we went to the local news agent

  • and we asked for a paper round job and we got one.

  • - Okay.

  • - And I think it paid around...

  • The first one I had paid nine pounds per week.

  • - That seems shockingly low.

  • - Well, yeah, it was a lot of money.

  • - Yeah, were you-- - When you're 12.

  • - When you're 12.

  • - Well, you had to be 13 to do it.

  • - Oh, were you 13?

  • - I think I might have been 12, I can't remember.

  • (Kate gasps) I was probably 13,

  • but it was, yeah, it was a cool job.

  • - Yeah? - It was fine,

  • 'cause I started off doing the afternoon round,

  • and mine was so easy.

  • - Okay.

  • - I think, 'cause they start you on the easy route,

  • to begin with, it might have only been 25 houses,

  • and you wore this paper bag,

  • I think that's what they called it,

  • or paper round bag, you put your newspapers in there,

  • the Lancashire Evening Post,

  • and you just deliver them through the mailbox.

  • - Were they heavy?

  • - Those weren't, but then my next one was

  • I had to do it on a bike,

  • so you put your bag on your back, fill it with newspapers.

  • It was really heavy, and I went on a bike,

  • and the Saturday morning edition, especially,

  • was very heavy,

  • 'cause they have those extra magazines in them,

  • and that was the morning one.

  • And I think that paid 14 pound a week.

  • It was more than any other paper round

  • because it was the hardest one, but I enjoyed it.

  • - So you got paid about two pounds a day?

  • - Yeah. - How long--

  • - No, well, six days a week,

  • I don't think I did the Sunday one.

  • - Okay. - But yeah, I was 14 and 15.

  • - How long did it take you?

  • - 45 minutes.

  • - Okay. - Yeah.

  • About 45 minutes, and then, yeah, after the paper round,

  • I know you want me to talk about this.

  • I had the milk round.

  • - I know!

  • You had a milk round.

  • - Yeah.

  • - Okay, I think that there is no one in our generation

  • in the United States who had a milk round.

  • - I wonder if they still do it in the UK?

  • - I don't know.

  • - It's not as...

  • I did read that they're trying to bring it back,

  • and if you're a little bit confused,

  • a milk round is when there's a milkman,

  • and he has a milk van (laughs)

  • and he fills the milk van with milk.

  • - With milk. (laugh)

  • - But bottles of milk,

  • and instead of going to the store to buy milk,

  • every morning, you have milk delivered to your doorstep

  • in these little glass bottles,

  • and they had different colored tops,

  • silver, red, and blue, I think,

  • and silver was whole milk, I think red was skimmed,

  • and blue might have been half and half

  • or something like that,

  • and we used to stand on the back of the milk van,

  • I think it's a milk van. - This is crazy to me.

  • This seems so dangerous.

  • - Well, it was, and at five a.m., we get picked up.

  • It took us two hours. - Wow.

  • - And yeah, so he'd shout out, "Two silver!"

  • So you grab two silvers, you run to the,

  • run, you can't walk, run to the door, put the silvers down,

  • take the empty bottles, and then put them back in the crate.

  • - Wow. - The milk crate.

  • And I did it, I only lasted a few weeks,

  • because it was the middle of winter.

  • (Kate shivers)

  • And my friend was small, so he could duck under the van.

  • My head was sticking out.

  • - Oh!

  • - And your hands were frozen,

  • because you're collecting those empty milk bottles

  • that were freezing.

  • - I cannot imagine that.

  • - Yeah.

  • - I can't imagine it.

  • - But that wasn't my dangerous job.

  • - What was your most dangerous job?

  • - At the driving rage.

  • - (gasps) Oh.

  • - Did I ever tell you about that job?

  • - I think you might have told me a little bit,

  • but clearly there's more to talk about.

  • - Well, so, at the golf driving range, I think I was 15,

  • and then I was doing the milk round

  • and then we realized that we could get paid

  • five pounds an hour, so two pounds fifty an hour,

  • to work at the driving range,

  • but they started all the new people in the wrong way.

  • - Uh-oh, what did they do?

  • - Well, they gave you one of those tubes to collect,

  • which you had to stab on the ball and go up.

  • I think it held probably 20 balls, this little tube,

  • and they'd say, "Okay, go to the 150 yard line,"

  • which is the most popular range to hit

  • when you're practicing golf, and go collect the golf balls.

  • And they did it, they put us out there at peak hours,

  • and they gave us a helmet, so like a motorcycle helmet,

  • and if you go to the driving range

  • and you see some kid with a helmet on collecting golf balls,

  • that's an immediate target.

  • - Oh no.

  • - So everyone would just aim for you,

  • (Kate gasps) and it was dark,

  • and you just didn't see these balls coming,

  • and they'd just hit you in the back, hit you in the leg.

  • - Was it really painful?

  • - Yeah, I mean, getting hit by a golf ball.

  • - Yeah.

  • - It's incredible that they did it.

  • - (laughs) Yeah.

  • - Before health and safety went crazy.

  • - Oh no.

  • - You could ban those kinds of jobs.

  • So yeah, that was a job I did for a little while,

  • but it got a lot better,

  • because I only worked Sundays after a while,

  • and the Sunday job was easy,

  • because nobody went to the driving range on a Sunday,

  • because they were playing golf.

  • - Right.

  • - But then you get in one of those carts.

  • What do you call that, the quad?

  • - We call them golf carts.

  • - Well, it wasn't just a golf cart.

  • It was more like a buggy.

  • - Like a dune buggy?