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  • Hello everybody this is Jack from

  • tofluency.com and we are back for

  • another conversation. If this is your

  • first time here then this is my wife

  • Kate, Hi! And what we like to do is we like

  • to have a conversation about specific

  • topic so that you can follow

  • along, improve your listening and learn new

  • words and phrases. And as always I'll

  • leave some phrases or the phrases that

  • we use in the video in the description.

  • So, we are going to talk about housing

  • today and houses in general. Now

  • something that you might not know about

  • Kate is that she is obsessed with real

  • estate. It's true. Just tell everyone what you do on a

  • daily basis.

  • In terms of real estate. In terms

  • of real estate. Well really i'm just

  • interested in all of the houses that are

  • around us. The way that people live.

  • The way that they sell houses.

  • I don't want to be a realtor but I love

  • seeing what people do with their spaces

  • and just you know especially in a place

  • like Asheville which has so many neat old homes

  • in the craftsman style and then city

  • apartments.

  • It's just interesting to see kind of how

  • people live and how they make places

  • their homes. I'm a little bit

  • obsessed.

  • That's cool. And you use an app called Zillow.

  • I do use Zillow - yes. And Zillow is this app

  • that you can have on your phone. You can

  • access on your computer too and it just

  • shows exactly what's available now, what

  • sold for what price, you know in the last

  • couple of years. We are not affiliated with Zillow.

  • No, we use it a lot. And we

  • thought we'd talk about housing today and

  • Kate mentioned you know craftsman style

  • houses, maybe apartments. So we are going to talk

  • about the different types of houses that

  • people live in. In the U.K. , in America.

  • We're going to look at some of the

  • differences with the language as well

  • with British and American English. I thought

  • good place to start would be talking

  • about the places that we grew up in.

  • Ok. So that the type of house that you grew up

  • in. So, maybe you can just lead up with that.

  • Well the house that I grew up in was kind of

  • special because my father built it. So

  • I grew up in a really small town and

  • my grandparents had some land that

  • they gave to my parents when they were

  • young and starting a family. And my dad

  • built us this house which was just a

  • magical place to grow up. It was filled with

  • light, it was quite large and

  • tucked away back in the woods. And my

  • mom recently sold it but it was, it was

  • such a special home

  • i've grown up in and very

  • quiet and suburban which is really different

  • than how you grew up right? Yeah, it

  • was definitely different because your

  • house was situated in the woods in a very

  • quiet and small town. And you felt like

  • you were, you know, out in the country.

  • Yes. I mean you were out in the country.

  • Absolutely. Even though it was close to the

  • main center of the town you were in but there

  • wasn't anything going on. No. There was

  • nothing going on. Literally nothing. But the house is

  • beautiful. As you said it was filled with

  • light, it was spacious and it had this

  • area outside as well which was just

  • incredible. Yeah. Yeah. By the way we

  • have our baby along again today and

  • she might be a little bit louder today

  • so hopefully it won't distract you too much.

  • Poor little thing has a cold so she might

  • sound a little bit stuffed up. Yeah.

  • So, yeah, and you talked about how

  • that was different to where I grew

  • up. I grew up just outside the center

  • of Preston. So it was like in a

  • neighborhood called Fulwood which is

  • a very nice neighborhood. And we had what

  • we call the detached house because in

  • the U.K. and we're going to look at this

  • in a second but we have housing such as

  • terraced houses and semi-detached

  • houses too. So a detached house means

  • that it was there and not attached to a

  • different house.

  • Oh Ok. So it had its own like land and

  • property. And it was a big house it was

  • quite big. And I have so many fond

  • memories growing up there but it was a

  • very traditional brick style house. There

  • were I think three, no there were four bedrooms

  • upstairs. And then we had an extension

  • put on there I think when I was about ten.

  • And that became my bedroom when I was about

  • 14 or 15. So I slept downstairs away from

  • everyone else in this big bedroom because

  • the two bedrooms we had we're really

  • small. But I have so many fond memories

  • of that place and my parents sold it

  • in, I think about 2001-2002. And then they moved to

  • Blackburn which was a town very close by but I

  • was at University then and then you know

  • we met and I, you know, we moved to Spain.

  • We're going to talk about Spain and

  • places that we lived. Just to say also I

  • know that you mentioned a lot of

  • vocabulary. The vocabulary for housing is

  • completely different in America. Yes. So, I

  • think that we don't even say detached

  • houses because we just assume that if

  • you have a house you are not attached to

  • anything else. It's just a free

  • standing house. And then if it is attached

  • to another house on two floors that's

  • usually a townhouse.

  • Yes, townhouse. And then did you mention

  • flats?

  • Well I think the equivalent of a

  • townhouse in the U.K. will be a terrace

  • house. Right. But the style is different. I

  • feel like a townhouse here is more

  • modern. Right. And you know it's like city

  • living. Whereas a terrace house in

  • the U.K. means like an old brick style

  • - we'll leave links to pictures below too -

  • but this was mainly done during the

  • industrial revolution to house workers

  • in a very efficient way. So they are quite

  • historic. Yeah, yeah, a lot of them are old

  • and I was reading about this before. They

  • went out of favor during the beginning

  • of the 20th century. Just around

  • World War One I feel when

  • semi-detached houses became the thing.

  • And a semi-detached house is

  • basically two houses in one

  • structure.

  • Ok. But yeah the terrace houses were

  • there for a reason to put workers in

  • close proximity to the factory.

  • And i was thinking about when I was at

  • University in Leeds. Leeds is full of

  • terraced houses. And I stayed in a couple

  • of those you know when I was at University there.

  • We have lived in all sorts of places though. We have lived in

  • so many places together. So when

  • we were five years into our

  • relationship. So we had been together

  • for five years.

  • Yeah. We calculated - do you remember doing this? Yes. And we

  • realized that we had lived in ten

  • different houses. Yeah. We had moved all

  • of our belongings ten different times and our

  • dog - all over the world.

  • Yeah cuz there was - there was

  • a house in Athens, Georgia. In Blackburn

  • in England, in France.

  • Three houses or three apartments in

  • Valencia. Two in Bilbao. And we'll

  • talk about those in a second I just want

  • to talk about the style of houses in the

  • U.K., in America. So we talked about

  • terraced houses and how they're different.

  • And they're not as popular here.

  • It's more like a townhouse. But also the material that

  • builders use and people have for the houses.

  • Yeah. So, what what difference do you see?

  • Well, one thing was when I went to

  • visit you in the U.K., I was amazed by how

  • many stone and stonework houses there

  • were. Because they're just most of the

  • time people build out of wood here.

  • So I guess stone and brick and it just

  • looked incredibly fancy to me and I

  • remember saying "Oh - this is amazing what a

  • beautiful neighborhood!".

  • And you said it was actually one of the

  • worst neighborhoods in your whole town.

  • It was really rundown and dangerous. We would call it

  • a rough neighborhood. A rough neighborhood? Yeah.

  • We could say that too. So that was a really rough

  • neighborhood. Yeah. But they had very fancy

  • and traditional terrace houses didn't they?

  • Which were more Victorian style.

  • Yeah. Do you remember? But I don't know if the

  • houses themselves were fancy

  • or if it was just me just looking at it as an

  • American and saying "oh it's old and it's

  • made out of stone - it has to be so fancy".

  • Because the wood is probably the

  • most common building material. And you

  • know there's that story of the three

  • pigs and of course the best house is

  • the one that's made out of stone.

  • Yeah. That will stand the test of time. I

  • found it quite strange when I moved here

  • to see so many wooden houses. And like you

  • said you you didn't realize, you couldn't

  • look an area and think oh this is an

  • affluent area, this is a rough area, this is you

  • know in between area. And I had that

  • problem when we moved here too.

  • Yeah. But I've got used to this now and I

  • can I know areas you know I know if it's a

  • family-friendly area, an up and coming

  • area. All those different styles

  • of places that you come across.

  • Yeah, that's interesting. Let's look at the

  • difference now between apartment, condo,

  • and flat. Okay, well we've talked about some of it.

  • Well no the actual difference to what these words mean.

  • Oh ok - I don't know if I know this. Well I just did some research.

  • Oh tell me. We call apartments flats.

  • So apartment is American English and a

  • flat is British English. Ok. But i was

  • reading a condo the difference between

  • an apartment and a condo is that the

  • condo is owned by individual owners.

  • So you buy a condo off someone but an

  • apartment is part of housing authority

  • or you know someone owns all these

  • apartments

  • and rents them out. Oh I didn't know that. I know, I thought that was

  • new information for you and for

  • everyone. This just leads us into Bilbao.

  • Do you remember looking for a place

  • in Bilbao and how naive we were? Yeah.

  • Yes we were. We just - I think any

  • time that you move to another country

  • figuring out the basic things like how

  • to rent a house, how to get a cell phone.

  • It's really really challenging.

  • Especially if you don't speak the

  • language. Exactly.

  • Because nobody can really explain

  • it to you in different words. No, and also.....

  • And we were new at Spanish, you know at