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  • Neil: Hello. Welcome to 6 Minute English, I'm Neil.

  • Catherine: And I'm Catherine.

  • Neil: Catherine, I'm going to start this

  • programme with a quick test, just for you.

  • Catherine: Ooo, I love tests!

  • Neil: Complete this phrase: Wake up and

  • smell the...

  • Catherine: Coffee Neil! It's coffee. I have

  • to say, I love coffee, it's great.

  • Neil: OK, so do you drink much?

  • Catherine: Well, just a couple of cups, you

  • know.

  • Neil: Every day?

  • Catherine: No, no, every hour! I love coffee,

  • don't you like coffee, Neil?

  • Neil: I do but maybe not as much as you!

  • What's the best thing about it?

  • Catherine: It's the smell. It's got to be the

  • smell.

  • You know, when you open the packet, it's

  • great, isn't it?

  • Neil: Yes, but it never quite tastes as good

  • as it smells, does it?

  • Catherine: Well no, not really. It's always a

  • bit disappointing. I live in hope, another

  • cup, I think it will be better. I might change

  • brands actually and try a different one.

  • Neil: OK, you've had quite a lot of coffee

  • today, haven't you?

  • Catherine: Just the usual six cups.

  • Neil: Well, our topic today is the smell of

  • coffee and coffee is also the subject of

  • today's question. The world's biggest

  • producer of coffee is ...

  • Catherine: Brazil! Brazil!

  • Neil: Yes, yes, but that's not the question. The

  • question is, Brazil is the biggest coffee

  • producer, which is the second largest

  • coffee producing country? Is it:

  • a: Colombia, b: Vietnam, c: Ethiopia

  • Catherine: Right, so it's not Brazil but I bet

  • it's another South American country, so I'm

  • going to go for Columbia. Columbia, is

  • that right?

  • Neil: We'll have the answer later in the

  • programme but which time, maybe the

  • caffeine will have left your body, Catherine.

  • Tim Hayward is a coffee shop owner. He

  • appeared in the BBC Radio 4 programme

  • The Kitchen Cabinet. How important does

  • he say the smell of coffee is?

  • It's absolutely vital, it's the key thing.

  • When you walk in to the coffee shop in

  • the morning and that smell hits you,

  • you're getting physiological responses.

  • Neil: So how important is it?

  • Catherine: I'm feeling a bit calmer now.

  • Tim Hayward says the smell of coffee is

  • vital. That means it's very important, it's

  • perhaps the most important thing. And he

  • backs this up by saying that it's the key

  • thing. Something that's key is

  • essential, it's really important.

  • Neil: And he says that when you

  • experience the smell,

  • when the smell hits you, you get a

  • physiological response. This phrase

  • means your body has a reaction to the

  • smell of coffee. Perhaps your mouth

  • begins to water in anticipation.

  • Catherine, when you get a coffee, do you

  • normally have it there or take it away?

  • Catherine: Well, I usually take it away,

  • although if I'm feeling really in need of a

  • coffee hit, I might have one there and then

  • get another one and take with me.

  • Neil: Can you describe the container that you

  • are given when you have a coffee to go?

  • Catherine: Yes, it's in a tall paper cup with a lid.

  • And the lid has a hole in it so that I can

  • drink that lovely coffee.

  • Neil: Don't you think that's a problem? I

  • mean, we know how important the smell

  • is, so what is the effect of the lid on that

  • experience?

  • Catherine: The effect of the lid?

  • Neil: Yes. Well here's Tim Hayward again

  • talking about coffee being served with lids.

  • What baffles me is that how many of the

  • large coffee chains actually sell a product

  • in a cup that removes the smell. So you

  • walk into the coffee shop, you get the

  • smell, but when you actually take the

  • drink out you are drinking it from

  • something that is designed to deliver

  • the hot liquid directly past your tongue

  • but stop any smell coming up to your

  • nose. That's just weird.

  • Neil: So what is it he's describing there?

  • Catherine: I see, yes, He's talking

  • about the big coffee chains. A chain is a

  • company that has lots of its stores in

  • towns and cities sometimes

  • around the world. I think we can all think

  • of a few well-known coffee chains.

  • And he says that by putting a lid on take away

  • cups, you're actually blocking the smell -

  • that smell that is really important to the

  • coffee experience.

  • Neil: Yes, and he says that he finds that

  • weird, which is a way of saying he finds it

  • unusual, thinks it's strange, odd. So much

  • so that he says it baffles him. If you are

  • baffled by something, you find it

  • confusing, you can't really understand it.

  • Here's Tim Hayward again.

  • What baffles me is how many of the

  • large coffee chains actually sell a product

  • in a cup that removes the smell. So you

  • walk into the coffee shop, you get the

  • smell, but when you actually take the

  • drink out you are drinking it from

  • something that is designed to deliver

  • the hot liquid directly past your tongue

  • but stop any smell coming up to your

  • nose. That's just weird.

  • Neil: That was coffee shop owner Tim

  • Hayward. Right, before we have another

  • cup of this week's vocabulary, let's get the

  • answer to the question. After Brazil, which

  • country produces most coffee? Is it:

  • a: Colombia, b: Vietnam, c: Ethiopia

  • Catherine, you said?

  • Catherine: I said it was a: Colombia.

  • Neil: Ah, sorry, no extra coffee for you

  • today! The answer is Vietnam. And now

  • on to the vocabulary we looked at.

  • Take it away Catherine.

  • Catherine: So the first word was vital,

  • which is an adjective that means very

  • important. And another word with a very

  • similar meaning was key, meaning essential.

  • Neil: Next we had the phrase

  • physiological responses. Physiological

  • refers to what our bodies do and a

  • response is a reaction. So a physiological

  • response is a reaction your body has to

  • something, like the smell of coffee.

  • Catherine: Something that baffles you,

  • confuses you, you don't understand it.

  • Neil: You might find something that

  • baffles you to be weird. This adjective

  • means unusual or strange.

  • Catherine: And finally, a chain is a group

  • of shops from the same company with

  • the same name.

  • Neil: Well that is the end of our programe.

  • For more from us, check out Instagram,

  • Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and our App

  • and of course

  • the website bbclearningenglish.com.

  • See you soon, bye.

  • Catherine: Bye! Fancy a coffee?

  • Neil: I think you've had too much!

Neil: Hello. Welcome to 6 Minute English, I'm Neil.

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A2 UK catherine smell hayward physiological coffee shop brazil

The smell of coffee: 6 Minute English

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    Li-chieh Young posted on 2019/06/11
Video vocabulary