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  • De-Be-De-Be-De-De-Da

  • - Hi guys. - Hello everybody.

  • - I'm just putting this blanket on for modesty.

  • - It's called a modesty blanket.

  • - A modesty blanket, I did get a message, an email

  • from my grandma saying that she watched the Paris video.

  • However, you were able to see up my skirt

  • during the first bit.

  • And I said, that wasn't really the point.

  • - It wasn't really what you should have been

  • looking at, Grandma.

  • - It was the subject matter.

  • - But, if you do want to go and watch Lia's knickers

  • we will link it up in the cards above, actually

  • it's above my head 'cause I'm sat on your side.

  • - Oh my gosh, what is this?

  • - That's weird. - Controversy.

  • - Lia and Joel. - Joel and Lia.

  • Lia and Joe today.

  • - But anyway, as you know, as some of you loyal viewers

  • will sense that we are in our apartment in New Jersey,

  • which is just sort of not that far from New York,

  • our New York trip, basically. - Yep.

  • - So, this video, as you can tell by the title

  • is going to be about comparisons between

  • New York and London.

  • - Yeah, and I'd love to wear a Skinny Legend hat

  • if I may.

  • - Yes, which one.

  • - Just the black one that's right there.

  • So, a lot of people have said to us, "Oh, what's the main

  • "differences between New York and London?

  • "How are you guys finding it? Are you missing home?"

  • I'm going to ditch it just because of the light.

  • Not because I don't like it, I absolutely love it.

  • Link in description, think it's sold out.

  • (laughs) - Cheers.

  • - But yeah, I just think we should touch on a few things

  • so like he vibe here, transport, and the size.

  • - Yes, so I think we should start with the size

  • 'cause it's the most maybe obvious one.

  • New York feels so much bigger than London,

  • and I guess it is much bigger than London.

  • - It is, it's so overwhelmingly big.

  • Like, it's not like everything's a walking distance away.

  • You were saying that in London if I'm in Marble Arch

  • and you're in, I don't know, Holborn we could just walk it.

  • - Yeah, and like I can walk from where I live in London,

  • which is fairly far out to the center of London

  • within about two, two and a half hours.

  • If I was to walk the length of Manhattan that alone

  • would probably be two, two and a half hours

  • let alone going into Brooklyn, Queens, all the other places.

  • - All the neighborhoods, like one night we walked like

  • 35 blocks home.

  • And, we were just like cool. - Crazy.

  • - Not home, that was just to the station

  • in order to get home.

  • And, stopping people for direction 'cause we didn't

  • have internet on our phone.

  • And we're like, "We're just checking we're going

  • "in the right way."

  • And they're like, "Just get on the metro."

  • - They're like, "It's about a half an hour walk."

  • - We were like, "You're joking, that's like nothing."

  • They're like, "No, you wanna get on the subway."

  • We were like, "No, we're Londoners we walk everywhere."

  • - We're like we're not Skinny Legends for nothing, you know.

  • - Yeah, exactly we've gotta do 16,000 steps a day,

  • minimum. - Minimum, literally.

  • - So funny when we met that viewer today and she only

  • does like 3,000 steps.

  • (laughs)

  • She's so sweet.

  • - She was so lovely.

  • But yeah, so size, I think that's a big thing.

  • - It's like, if you have to get the metro everywhere

  • how much do you really wanna, do you know what I mean?

  • When it kind of, every time I go on my maps

  • it's gonna take us an hour to get anywhere.

  • So, we finish up at a meeting and we have to allow

  • sort of like 45 minutes to an hour to get to the next one.

  • - Yeah, so it's just a bit time consuming.

  • But, talking about transport that's the next big thing.

  • And, I definitely, definitely 100% believe that London

  • wins on this one. - London wins.

  • - I've been told that London has the best public

  • transport system of any city in the world.

  • And, I'm starting to see that.

  • Went to Paris, the metro doesn't compare.

  • New York, the subway doesn't come close.

  • - Berlin doesn't compare, Germany.

  • Like, but London it's not until you, you know when they

  • say you don't know what you've got until it's gone?

  • You don't know what you've got until it's gone.

  • - No, I didn't think anything of it.

  • I'm just like, "Well, that's what it is."

  • Whereas, now I'm here like you go on some of the platforms

  • on the subway there are no electronic boards saying,

  • "The next train will be in two minutes.

  • "The next train will be in four minutes.

  • "The next train will be in eight minutes."

  • Like, you don't get that information.

  • The only things it wins at are the fact that the trains

  • are all air con.

  • - Air con train, or AC, 'cause I know the word air con

  • is triggering some of you.

  • I've had some comments about that.

  • Yeah, they were like, "If they say air con one more time

  • "I'm gonna shoot myself."

  • - AC? - I know.

  • I was like, okay AC then.

  • - It takes the same amount of time to say

  • - [Both] AC as it does to say air con.

  • - Same syllables, so get over yourselves

  • you triggered Skinny Legends.

  • - Getting so triggered, you lot.

  • Yes, so air con wins.

  • We get on the tube and we sweat.

  • You guys get on the subway and you're--

  • - De-sweat. - Yeah, you de-sweat.

  • - De-sweat. - You de-sweat.

  • - But, in terms of the platforms everything's

  • dirty, everything's smelly.

  • - Someone was like, "Have you seen any rats yet?"

  • Seen loads. - Yeah, loads of rats.

  • - So many. - In London

  • you see mice.

  • - You see these tiny little mice, and they're adorable.

  • I always put them on my story, tiny little mice.

  • - Yeah, and I just think it's just general transport

  • is a lot better in London.

  • I also think it's less confusing, but I don't know

  • if that's just because I am a Londoner and I've got used

  • to the system, but I genuinely think it's less confusing.

  • There are maps everywhere.

  • - Yes, there's maps everywhere but there's one really,

  • really, really annoying thing about the subway.

  • And, that is if you make a mistake you have to pay again

  • to get back on and fix it.

  • - You have to exit and then swipe your Metrocard again.

  • - That is so bad.

  • - In London, you don't do that.

  • - You don't, you just literally get out a the next one

  • walk over the stairs down to the other side

  • of the platform and go back to where you came from.

  • But, you can't do that in New York without coming out

  • and then swiping back in.

  • - And, it is cheaper, it's like one dollar something,

  • isn't it, per journey, regardless of your length of journey.

  • Whereas in London it's judged by zone and the minimum fare

  • is like two, three pounds. - Is it?

  • - Which is like four or five dollars.

  • - Is that the minimum fare?

  • - I think so.

  • - I thought minimum fare was like 1.85.

  • - That's if you're a student yeah 'cause you're like

  • with your under 25. - Yeah, interesting.

  • - But, if you're not, like me, then you're gonna pay

  • full fare which is like two pound 30 minimum, I think

  • or something like that.

  • - Yeah, on the zone, on like zone one, two,

  • three or something.

  • - But, linked on from that is the Metrocard.

  • Oh my gosh, we have contactless so you can use

  • your bank card, you just tap it in and you go in.

  • Or you can use your Oyster card, tap it or you can use

  • a paper card if you have to if you're a tourist.

  • Here your Metrocards are just flimsy paper

  • and you have to like swipe it through a groove.

  • - Yeah, swipe it through a groove.

  • - Drive through groove. - Swipe it through the groove.

  • - Can you believe you've gotta swipe it through, but also--

  • - And they all expire. - They expire.

  • - So then you lose your money on these cards

  • that are not even cards. - You have to get another one.

  • - There's all this paper, just loads and loads of paper.

  • Amena was showing us like 10,000 bits of paper.

  • She was like, "One of these won't have expired."

  • And you're just like-- - I can't believe it.

  • - 2018. - 2018,

  • why haven't you got electronic boards?

  • Why haven't you got like contactless or just make it

  • easy for people.

  • - Anytime something triggering, anytime something

  • triggers us we literally look at each other and go,

  • "2018." - "2018."

  • Like seriously. - We go onto the platform

  • there's no signs, there's no (mumbles).

  • We've got no idea how long it's gonna take

  • for a train.

  • We haven't got an app because we haven't got the internet.

  • We just go

  • 2018. - 2018.

  • - That's also triggering to Americas to say 2018.

  • They're like, "I can't believe you say 2018."

  • But, that's how Brits say it.

  • - 2000 and that's gonna be in the merch lines

  • every single year.

  • Right now it's 2018,

  • next year 2019. - Next year, 2019.

  • The next year will just be

  • - [Both] 2020.

  • - 2020.

  • - That's gonna be so weird.

  • It's 2020, it's 2020.

  • - Oh, I don't like that.

  • - I don't like that at all.

  • - That means we've become Americanized.

  • - Yeah. - We're losing

  • our Britishness. - Are we losing it?

  • 2020. - We love being basic Brits.

  • - Basic Brits, everyday, basic Brit face.

  • Oh my gosh, like today, when I just pulled that chair away

  • I forgot to ask the woman, "Is anyone sitting there?"

  • I just took the chair.

  • - That was so funny.

  • - I was like, "I've never been any less British in my life."

  • - Yeah, you were just like grabbed it and she was like.

  • - Someone had come to say hello to us and we were on

  • a two seater.

  • And, I was like, "Pull up a chair."

  • And, I just grabbed the nearest chair that was like

  • connected to a big table.

  • And then like, this woman looked over.

  • And, I was like, "Oh my gosh, I am so sorry.

  • "Was that chair available."

  • Before you know it I've created a scene in Panera Bread.

  • And, I made such a scene. - Of course you did.

  • - I kept apologizing and she was like, "it's fine,

  • "it's genuinely fine, it's fine."

  • And, I was like profusely apologizing.

  • - So, what about the people, the last thing?

  • - The vibe. - The difference between

  • the vibe and the people, things like that.

  • - We said it a few times, I think the pace is slower.

  • - I do, I don't know if that's just 'cause the city's

  • more spread out so it's less intense, less people

  • in one space but it does feel less busy.

  • - Yeah, it feels less like London chaos.

  • - Like get out of my way. - Get out of my way.

  • Maybe , okay, we haven't traveled in at eight a.m.

  • for a nine o'clock start sort of thing.

  • - Yeah, but I do think Americans and even New Yorkers,

  • you've got some Americans saying New Yorkers are

  • the rudest Americans.

  • I still think they're more patient than Londoners.

  • - Yeah, they're quite<