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  • - Hi, we're Joel and Lia.

  • - And today's video is things Americans do

  • that drive Brits crazy.

  • Dee da dee da dee dee da

  • - Okay so this video is based on true stories,

  • our own experiences,

  • and also from an article that we found on the insider.com.

  • So we're just gonna just discuss, go through it,

  • add our own two cents.

  • Is that what-- (laughing)

  • what is that?

  • - Two cents. Three cents. - Add our three cents.

  • - Two cents. - Add our two cents.

  • - Two cents.

  • - So we're really smart.

  • So there you go. (clapping)

  • - Yeah, well done. - Well done us.

  • - Also, I don't know why we say cents in the U.K.,

  • 'cause obviously we have pence.

  • - Yeah.

  • - Not cents.

  • - Add your two pence.

  • - Add your two, oh, maybe we do say that.

  • - Do we say that?

  • - I don't know.

  • - Add your two pence.

  • No, no one says-- - Two pence.

  • - Two pence.

  • (laughing)

  • Add your two pence.

  • - No.

  • Anyway. - No one has ever said that.

  • Anyway. Should we just get straight on with it.

  • - Let's just jump straight in.

  • So the first one that drives Brits crazy is that,

  • apparently Americans tend to buy drinks

  • when you're with a group of friends,

  • you buy drinks one by one instead of buying in rounds.

  • Which, I didn't really know that they did this.

  • - Yeah, so, according to Insider, it's not unusual for

  • American to just go to a bar and buy their own drink.

  • Whereas, if we were in a group of four

  • say-- - Yeah.

  • - Or even just us two-- - Yeah.

  • - It would be you'd get the first round of drinks

  • for both of us, and then I'd get the next round,

  • and so on, and the same with a big group.

  • Like, it could be even up to groups of like

  • nine or 10 where someone's getting the round

  • and then the next person's getting the

  • whole round of drinks, it's like.

  • - And it's costing them

  • so much money. - So much money.

  • - But the rule is that every who's in on that gets a round.

  • So if there's 10 people,

  • there's gonna be 10 rounds of drinks.

  • - Yeah.

  • - And, and so you know that you're gonna end up

  • getting your money back in a way.

  • - In a way. - In the form of a drink.

  • - Yeah.

  • If not more.

  • No, the same.

  • - The same.

  • - Yeah.

  • - I'm like, I'm like, how can you win?

  • How can you win?

  • - Maths.

  • (laughing)

  • - Um, I think that there's pros and cons to both.

  • Because sometimes I wish that we could do it

  • the American way.

  • - Yeah, oh me too.

  • - Where you just buy your own drink

  • and it's not expected of you to get the round.

  • - Oh definitely.

  • I do that all the time anyway.

  • Like, if I'm like, oh, I'm not being involved.

  • - You're not part of it.

  • - Because I don't want six rounds of drinks.

  • I just want

  • one drink. - One drink.

  • Yeah, exactly.

  • Or, I want a diet Coke--

  • - That's quite American of you.

  • - Which is cheaper than a pint of beer.

  • So then I'm like, well I'm not gonna pay for everyone's

  • round of beer when my diet Coke is like a lot cheaper.

  • - Yeah, I know, that's the thing, like, to,

  • but in the U.K., like, to get out of the round,

  • you have to literally be that one person who's like,

  • I'm not doing rounds.

  • And then everyone's like.

  • So for British people, like, someone scooting off

  • and like buying their own drink is considered like rude,

  • and that you're stingy, and like, you know, a bit cheap.

  • - Yeah.

  • - Um, so.

  • That's what is so annoying.

  • - I know.

  • - How we kind of wish that we were the other way.

  • - I know.

  • I think we're more American in that sense--

  • - Yeah.

  • - It wouldn't drive us crazy.

  • But it tends to drive Brits crazy apparently.

  • - Yeah.

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  • We post videos thrice weekly.

  • - Okay, the next one is to do with the royal family.

  • So, it's anyone who like criticizes the royal family.

  • It can just be a little touchy subject I think.

  • - Yeah.

  • - It varies, doesn't it?

  • 'Cause we're like British and we really really

  • love the royal family.

  • Then you've got British people that are a bit like,

  • meh, not bothered.

  • - Yeah.

  • - And then you've got people that

  • don't like the royal family.

  • - Oh I know plenty of Brits that hate the royal family.

  • - Oh, they just hate it.

  • - But it's like that rule of like,

  • I can criticize Lia, but no one else can.

  • Like, you know, with someone your close to--

  • - Yeah.

  • - It's like, we Brits can criticize our royal family,

  • but Americans can't.

  • - Yeah.

  • - Or like, not just Americans but anyone else can't.

  • - Yeah, it's definitely that.

  • - Yeah.

  • - I know exactly, I know exactly.

  • It's like someone insulting like a family member of yours

  • and you're like,

  • stop. - Excuse me?

  • - I'm sorry but-- - I know.

  • - When was it okay for you to say that?

  • - Also, especially when those people get it wrong like,

  • because it works out something like 63p per year per person

  • we pay to the royal family.

  • - I know.

  • - So when people comment like,

  • oh you're paying so much taxes for these people to live

  • in a gold palace.

  • You're like, yeah, I pay 63p per year

  • for a royal family.

  • I'm fine with that.

  • - I'm happy.

  • It brings so much to us and to the U.K.

  • - Yeah.

  • - So many like, good weddings on the telly.

  • - Yeah.

  • (laughing)

  • (sighing)

  • But I think it, it goes the other way around like,

  • with Donald Trump obviously lots of people in the U.K.

  • have their own opinions,

  • and I imagine Americans would be a bit like,

  • well, not all Americans, some would be like,

  • don't criticize my president, because--

  • - Yeah, it goes both ways doesn't it?

  • - And we, and so, we probably get on your nerves

  • by doing that with your politicians or celebrities.

  • - Yeah.

  • - But, hey, that's life isn't it?

  • - That's life.

  • It's always gonna be someone triggered somewhere.

  • - Yeah.

  • So the next thing that Brits get driven a bit crazy about

  • is the perception that Americans are a bit more bragging.

  • Well, this article says bragging.

  • I don't know why I'm saying it like it's my opinion.

  • This article has said, you're bragging.

  • - Yeah.

  • I think what it is is what we were told at drama school,

  • that we can all afford to be a bit more American.

  • That we were actually told that

  • by one of our acting teachers who was just like,

  • be a bit bolder.

  • Like, be a bit more proud of yourself.

  • Sell yourself a bit better.

  • We just don't.

  • Like-- - No.

  • - If anything, over Christmas,

  • we'll just downplay everything.

  • You know, seeing friends and family.

  • And how's it all going.

  • And just constantly just underplaying everything.

  • Because it's just not really in our DNA to be like,

  • I'm amazing.

  • La la la la.

  • It just makes them, it makes them cringe.

  • It makes British people, it makes you cringe a bit.

  • It's just so out of our comfort zone.

  • - I know. But it's not even just saying I'm amazing.

  • It's just stating the facts of what you've done.

  • - Yeah, not, yeah, exactly.

  • - Like just, if an American was just to be like,

  • hey, I run my own business, I'm a CEO of this.

  • And I've, I've turned over this many million this year.

  • A British person might be like, okay, bragging.

  • - Okay, didn't ask you how much you earned or something.

  • - No.

  • But like, they're essentially just stating the truth.

  • They're not like bragging.

  • - Exactly.

  • - But Brits perceive it as bragging.

  • - That's what's amazing though.

  • It's like, they just say it.

  • - Yeah.

  • - And to them it's normal.

  • - Yeah.

  • - But the problem is actually with British people

  • because we go, that was so, that was so braggy.

  • - Yeah, yeah. - Do you know what I mean?

  • We're like, the majority of British people

  • can't handle that.

  • - No, they can't.

  • So, I think you're right.

  • I think we can, all of these things I think

  • have positive spins.

  • It's just completely different cultures.

  • Britain and the U.S.A. are so similar,

  • but also so different in the way that we interact.

  • - Yeah, like, someone say,

  • "Oh, how's your YouTube channel getting on?"

  • You're like,

  • "Yeah, yeah, we're doing really well."

  • "Oh really, how many, how many subscribers have you got?"

  • "Um, what was it?" Well, we know how many we've got.

  • Saying it, I could say it in a second.

  • - I know exactly.

  • - I know exactly the number but you're like, um,

  • probably, nearly 200,000 I think.

  • - Yeah.

  • - What?

  • And then you wait for them to, do you know what I mean, like

  • you don't want any kind of, I don't know,

  • attention around it. - I know it's so weird.

  • - It's really weird.

  • - And I know American YouTubers are also like,

  • when someone asks what they do they're like,

  • "Hey, I'm a YouTuber, yeah."

  • Like, they just say it.

  • - Yeah.

  • - Whereas like, I can't say it.

  • When someone is like, what do you? I'm like, I um--

  • - Make videos for online and--

  • - Yeah, or even before I say it I come with a qualifying

  • thing of being like,

  • oh, it's really weird but like, I make YouTube videos,

  • and like, eh.