Placeholder Image

Subtitles section Play video

  • - Hi, we're Joel and Lia.

  • - And this video is 10 differences

  • between Canada and the UK.

  • Let's discuss.

  • (playful vocalizing)

  • - So we've never been to Canada.

  • - I've been!

  • - Oh have you? - I've been twice.

  • - Oh you, when? - But I was little.

  • - You were young.

  • - I don't really have memories.

  • - We just want to include Canada a bit more.

  • - Yeah. (chuckles)

  • - Because we already talk about America and the UK.

  • - We just leave them out, don't we?

  • - Yeah, we do, but, - Yeah.

  • - it's because there aren't many,

  • like these articles, we're discussing an article by the way,

  • on Huffington Post.

  • But people don't tend to write about the differences

  • between Canada and the UK.

  • It's always America and the UK.

  • So there's loads of stuff for us to do,

  • to do with America. - So,

  • we're just gonna tickle you,

  • tickle you a bit today. - Yeah.

  • Tease you. - Just tease you a little bit.

  • And we're just gonna discuss the article,

  • and say whether we think this is true or false.

  • - Yeah. - Especially about

  • the UK stuff.

  • - Yeah, and if you're from Canada, and you're watching,

  • go leave like a Canada flag emoji,

  • or just be like, "I'm Canadian," in the comments,

  • 'cause we'd be really interested to see

  • how many of you are Canadian.

  • - Say it just like that,

  • "I'm Canadian!" - Yeah, "I'm Canadian!"

  • (Lia laughs)

  • Right, so the first one is that

  • Canadians want you to have a nice day,

  • whereas Brits want you to fail.

  • - So it just goes back to the whole positivity thing.

  • - Yeah. - That like,

  • I know we've said it about Americans loads,

  • and maybe Canadians are the same,

  • in that they just genuinely want you

  • to have a nice day. - I know.

  • - But Brits don't really say, "Have a nice day."

  • Or they might say it, but do they ever mean it?

  • - I don't know.

  • Obviously it's all a huge stereotype.

  • - Yeah. - But Brits are nice people,

  • but there is just that deep underlying thing

  • where you just want someone to just

  • fail at what they're doing.

  • - (chuckling) Yeah. - I don't know why.

  • - It's so weird.

  • It's like embedded in Brits. - Yeah.

  • - It's like, (sighs)

  • it's like when you see someone

  • really trying to do something at the gym,

  • and you're like, "Just fall." - Yeah.

  • I know. - (laughing) It's so bad!

  • - About everything, and especially at the moment

  • with politics and stuff , like the Prime Minister,

  • everyone's just hoping that she'll fail,

  • and it's like,

  • it's so funny. - Oh no.

  • I do actually feel really sorry for her.

  • - I know. - I'm just like,

  • imagine being you, you're like a cartoon character now.

  • - I know, poor old woman.

  • - Poor old TM. - Literally old woman.

  • - Poor old woman.

  • - She's aged years since being in that role.

  • - That-- - Her posture's gone

  • from this to this.

  • - It literally has this now.

  • - Yeah, poor woman. - Open up darling.

  • - Open up Theresa May. - Have a nice--

  • (giggling) Open up TM.

  • And have a nice day.

  • - Yeah, TM the PM.

  • - Yeah! (both laugh)

  • The next one's about fish.

  • Canadians eat sushi, and Brits like to

  • deep fry their fish in batter, and have fish and chips.

  • - Yeah. - Yeah.

  • - I mean, is it a well-known thing then

  • that Canadians are known for sushi?

  • - Well it must be.

  • Huffington Post is saying it.

  • They say, "Stroll around Vancouver,

  • "and you will notice swarms of health-conscious,

  • "attractive people, lining up for their nearest sushi."

  • - Wow, I thought sushi was Japanese.

  • - Yeah, but. (laughs)

  • Remember when we were in New York,

  • and certain places, just like sushi everywhere?

  • - Yeah, sushi everywhere.

  • But to be honest, it's spread everywhere hasn't it?

  • - Mm. - London's very sushi.

  • We love sushi.

  • - We do. - We'd be more likely

  • to eat sushi than fish and chips.

  • - I think so. - Yeah.

  • - It's just more like on-the-go food.

  • - Yeah.

  • - We'd never be like, "Let's just get fish and chips quick,"

  • - No. - We're just not,

  • that's not what we do. - Fish and chips

  • would be like a treat, where you're like,

  • "Oh my gosh, I should not be eating this battered fish."

  • - Yeah, I'm about to consume like 4,000 calories,

  • - Yeah. - in one little tiny tray

  • of fish and chips. - Yeah.

  • - So. - I also think

  • it's generational.

  • - Mm-hmm. - I think my grandparents,

  • my parents' and grandparents' generation

  • would eat fish and chips,

  • whereas-- - Especially on a Friday.

  • - Yeah. - Yeah.

  • - Whereas we would be more likely to order sushi.

  • - Oh, and we've done that. - Yeah.

  • - We've done like, I've done delivery sushi to my house.

  • - It's great. - So maybe we're

  • a bit more Canadian.

  • - I just hate sashimi.

  • Anything with like raw fish or salmon. (gags)

  • - Oh, I love salmon!

  • Oh, nigiri.

  • - Right, so the next one is that

  • Canadians go out for one beer,

  • whereas Brits will have six

  • before even leaving the house. (chuckling)

  • Which we've spoken about - It's so true,

  • isn't it? - drinking before.

  • - It's so true. - Yeah.

  • - It's really bad.

  • Like the whole - Yeah.

  • - like pre-drinks, - I know,

  • - the whole British attitude towards alcohol.

  • - And if-- - It's like,

  • "Oh I can't possibly go out and just have one."

  • - No. - Why would anyone do,

  • we would. - Yeah.

  • 'Cause we're lightweights. - 'Cause that's all it takes.

  • But there's just so many Brits that would just be like,

  • "No, if I'm gonna drink,

  • "I'm drinking to get drunk. - Yeah.

  • Yeah. - "I'm not just

  • "gonna have one, why would I do that, makes no sense."

  • - We're probably making it worse as well

  • by all the Prosecco.

  • The amount of people, like we've said, that are just,

  • like I did a video on my channel about my three addictions.

  • - Oh yeah. - Pepsi Max, sugar, pizza.

  • - Yeah.

  • - And they were like, "What about Prosecco?"

  • And I was like, "I'm not addicted to Prosecco."

  • - Oh! - I'll have Prosecco maybe

  • like twice a month or something,

  • but, - Okay.

  • - the perception we've put out there,

  • - Yeah, the-- - is that we drink Prosecco

  • every single day. (chuckling)

  • - Like I get family members,

  • hi Yaya, my grandma, (Joel laughs)

  • watching, saying, "You need to really look at your drinking,

  • "and you need to slow down and stop."

  • And I'm like, "Oh it's part of a performance.

  • "It's like a little character thing.

  • - It's just our thing. - "It's just like,

  • "it's our thing."

  • - Yeah. - But it's not, it's not.

  • So it's not a problem.

  • - It's not a problem.

  • - No one needs to worry. - We don't have a problem.

  • - Saying that, I did have two glasses

  • of Prosecco last night, but that was just for fun.

  • - Yeah, do you know what? - What?

  • - Last Saturday,

  • - Yeah. - I went to see my friends

  • near where my parents from

  • in Hampshires. - Yes!

  • - They've just moved there. - Yes.

  • - A glass of Prosecco, guess how much.

  • - Seven pounds.

  • - Three pound 95. - Stop.

  • - Three pound 95! - Stop!

  • - Yeah! - Stop.

  • - So cheap!

  • It's a minimum of like seven pounds in London, isn't it?

  • - (laughing) Oh I thought you were gonna say,

  • "It's a minimum of seven on card,

  • "so I had to buy like five." - Oh right.

  • So I had to buy two.

  • (both chuckle)

  • - So the next one is that Canadians think that

  • Britain is a place of magical castles and royalty,

  • and Brits think that Canada is basically just America.

  • (Joel laughs) So,

  • - Which is kinda true. - It's kinda true.

  • - I mean, that is true, because Canada,

  • I've learned, Canada is America.

  • We Brits call the US America.

  • - Yeah. - And then,

  • Mexico is something different,

  • Canada is something different,

  • but it's all America, apparently.

  • So technically we're right. - But isn't that,

  • isn't that offensive?

  • Is it offensive to call, - No that's true.

  • That's the continent is America.

  • - Oh! - All like North America.

  • - So why have they got a problem

  • with that? - Yeah.

  • (Lia laughs) Get over it.

  • - Get over it.

  • Guys, seriously. - I know.

  • - Canadians get triggered, - They do.

  • Do you remember that audition? - when they get called

  • American. (gasps)

  • - And everyone there was American, except me and Lia,

  • and a couple of Canadians. - Yeah.

  • - And I said something like that.

  • I was like, "Everyone here's American," they were like,

  • "I'm Canadian." - "I'm Canadian."

  • - I was like, "Well you sound American." (laughs)

  • - It was amazing, that was so funny.

  • We haven't heard back from that, have we?

  • - No. - No.

  • - It's probably 'cause we insulted the Canadians.

  • (both laugh) - It's probably why,

  • probably why we didn't get the job.

  • - I know, but the UK definitely isn't, I mean, actually,

  • I was gonna say it definitely isn't full of castles,

  • but it definitely is full of castles.

  • - Oh there's loads.

  • We were looking at some

  • - Yeah. - the other day online,

  • weren't we? - Yeah were were gonna

  • stay in a castle.

  • - (laughing) Do some filming there.

  • - Literally it's just so normal,

  • you're just like, - Just to perpetuate that

  • - castle. - idea more.

  • (both laugh) - Yeah.

  • - Amazing. - But it definitely

  • doesn't feel magical.

  • - No, I don't think so.

  • Though there's some, there's a little bit of magic.

  • - Yeah. - If you go

  • to places like Edinburgh, you're like,

  • "Ooh, this feels quite Harry Pottery."

  • - Yeah.

  • - But they're, no.

  • - No. - Not much, no magic really.