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  • >>> Ladies and gentlemen, would you please welcome Patrick Mork.

  • [ Applause ] >>Patrick Mork: Thank you. It's great to see

  • everybody today. Welcome to the marketing session of apps marketing 101 for developers

  • for Google Play. Delighted to see everybody here. It's been

  • a pretty amazing day, at least to say it's been a surprise, it's been full of surprises

  • even for some of us on the marketing team. It's been really exciting.

  • 20 billion app downloads, of course, on Google Play. One and a half billion downloads every

  • single month. And, of course, the source of a lot of those revenues, as you've seen from

  • some of the previous sessions, in application billing, of course, being on a tear.

  • We're going to talk to you about marketing today, spend a couple of minutes on how we

  • market the store and your apps to consumers, which I think could be of interest to a number

  • of you, and then talk about app marketing in itself, what is app marketing all about,

  • how should we do it? What kind of frameworks can we share with you and what kind of tools

  • can we share with you? Let's think about marketing for a second.

  • And probably some of you out there in the audience have heard of the famous four Ps.

  • Who's heard of the four Ps? Okay. A couple people.

  • Well, let's talk first of all what the four Ps are not.

  • Please, please, please, please download my application. Please, please, please buy my

  • app. Yes, you can do marketing that way, of course,

  • it's not the most effective. But we're going to talk about all the tricks in the books

  • that have to do with marketing, including the real four Ps which we'll get to in a minute.

  • One of the things I want to share is a little bit our friendly neighborhood checklist for

  • what it is to do marketing when we're talking about apps.

  • So if your eyes do kind of start glazing over at this point, it is 4:00 in the afternoon.

  • It's been a very exciting day. Don't worry. The presentation is going to be available

  • offline. And we'll have versions for you to download, especially of this particular slide.

  • What we're going to talk about is basically our apps, our business models, how to promote

  • applications, and how to distribute applications. And what we've done, actually, for all you

  • developers in the house to make this even easier is we've kind of color-coded everything.

  • So, basically, if you're a new developer or you're a developer who don't potentially have

  • a lot of experience developing or marketing applications, then there's a lot of this is

  • going to be new to you, especially the stuff in blue, which is the basic stuff on marketing

  • that you should be looking at. If you're already a little bit more advanced or an intermediate

  • developer with some basic marketing experience, you're going to want to look at all the things

  • that are highlighted in green. And, of course, for those of you who have

  • been really successful, or some of the larger developers who are making some money on Android,

  • which is always great news to hear, then a lot of the color coded stuff in red is advanced.

  • But before we go into the actual nuts and bolts, let's play a little video which gives

  • you a good idea of how we actually market apps to consumers.

  • This is gears and premiers exclusively at Google Play.

  • [ Video. ] >>> Suppose you buy an app on your computer

  • to send to your smartphone. You might need a cable to transfer it from one to the other.

  • And if you want it on your tablet, you need to transfer it again.

  • Suppose you used Google Play. You can buy an app on your computer and send

  • it to any of your Android devices instantly, with no cables.

  • Because Google Play makes your apps available anywhere, so you can enjoy them everywhere.

  • Google Play, your entertainment all simply here.

  • [ Video concludes. ] >>Patrick Mork: So this is kind of a little

  • bit just an example of how we're actually getting out there and really starting to market

  • applications on your behalf and going out and talking to consumers.

  • I think it's also worth sharing a little bit what are the other kinds of things that we're

  • doing to market Google Play. In particular, one of the things that's worth sharing with

  • all of you in the room and all of the people in our international audience who are live

  • streaming this today, is just how much effort is going into marketing the store.

  • In the first six weeks of launch alone, we did over 5 billion impressions to consumers

  • all over the world. Not to mention a lot of the other advertising that you may have seen,

  • for example, seeing Google Play available on the nav bar across all our Google properties.

  • Or a lot of the emails in CRM that we've been doing or a lot of the work that we've been

  • doing with partners. The advertising effort on behalf of the team

  • at Google Play and the marketing team has been nothing less than spectacular over the

  • past couple of months and is only going to grow and accelerate over time.

  • More importantly, though -- and this is really kind of, like, a big callout to all of you

  • in the room and to awesome of the developers who have supported us, as Hugo said in his

  • keynote -- is there's been a lot of love from the developer community, there's been a lot

  • of support from all our content partners, whether that's game developers, app developers,

  • books publishers, music labels, and movie studios. Really, kind of the feedback that

  • we've gotten from the community, from all our partners, has been tremendous. And has

  • really also helped accelerate the awareness of consumers of what Google Play is and as

  • a destination to get all the things content for their devices. So this has been amazing,

  • and we really thank you for that. But let's get to the nitty-gritty. Let's get

  • to the stuff that we're really interested in and excited about. And that is, how do

  • we actually market apps? Well, one of the ways that we look at things

  • at Google, and we encourage our partners to do the same, is really this very simple matrix

  • that our CMO, Lorraine Twohill, has come up with, which really guides the essence and

  • philosophy of marketing at Google. And that is really understanding users, building magical

  • experiences -- which in this case is you guys building magical applications -- and then

  • really connecting the two. So let's take a really kind of bizarre but

  • fun and specific example of how that works in reality when we talk about apps.

  • Let's say that you're a carpenter. Or you're doing DIY in your house. And you're fixing

  • chairs and you're hanging frames up on your wall and you're maybe adjusting beams, you

  • know, in your house and you're doing all sorts of work in your house. Well, how cool would

  • it be if when you're putting that frame up on the wall, the one that you kind of like

  • have to ask your wife to sit 50 meters behind you to tell if you it's crooked or straight,

  • how cool would it be if you had a little application that could do that for you? Like Ben Zibble's

  • bubble app. I could fire up my bubble app and place my phone on top of that frame and

  • see if the frame is perfectly aligned or not. Saves me a lot of time. Makes my life easier,

  • and to some extent as well, it's kind of a magical experience.

  • The point is that applications are either enhancing our lives or making our lives more

  • productive, or they're entertaining us. And they do it in such a way that really has a

  • magical quality and component to it. And our role as marketers and your role as

  • marketers is, how do we connect those two. How do we connect the magic of the apps that

  • we build with, essentially, an entertaining experience for a consumer or a productive

  • experience for consumers? But, really, before we actually get into the

  • nuts and bolts of the four Ps themselves, let's talk about research for a minute. Because

  • when you talk about users, it really starts with research. Before you even write that

  • first line of code, you really have to understand who your consumers are, what they're doing,

  • how they download apps, where they download apps, and how they consume and use those applications.

  • And, really, it's a lot simpler than would you think. People always think, oh, research.

  • They think about IDC or they think about Nielsen or they think about tens of thousand of dollars

  • spent on research. It's really not that complex or that expensive.

  • The way we break it down, for example, is we look at quantitative versus qualitative

  • research. At its very basic level, your quantitative research is basically when you go out and

  • you do extensive questionnaires and you survey thousands of different consumers or hundreds

  • of different consumers. And you're asking the basic questions that you're trying to

  • get answered. How often does this consumer download applications? What kind of handsets

  • are they using? How much per month are they spending downloading applications? How long

  • are they spending in an application session? You're really trying to understand kind of

  • the macro, broad picture of consumer demographics and habits and consumption to guide the development

  • philosophy for your application. Then, of course, as you start building your

  • application, you get near that famous milestone, that first milestone of having a beta or an

  • alpha, then, really, it's about qualitative research. And qualitative research can take

  • a lot of different forms, like focus groups, for example. Or screen focus groups, or just

  • sitting down with a bunch of people that you may or may not know that well around pizza

  • and beers and trying to understand what they think of your app. And this is really the

  • in-depth part of the market research, which is where you're really trying to understand

  • how's the consumer using my app? How quickly does my app load? What kind of features do

  • they like? How easy is the UI to navigate? And what kind of features could enhance the

  • application? Or better yet, what features should I remove because the consumers simply

  • don't either get the features or they don't really use the features?

  • The best news about research and its ability to guide our development philosophy, as I

  • said earlier, is that it's neither that expensive or that time-consuming. You can start right

  • now and you can do research online. You can go, for example, to google.com/insights, put

  • together three simple questions, survey 1500 consumers and get answers in three to four

  • days at less than $1,000. On the quantitative side.

  • And your focus groups -- again, this is something you just need to know enough people that you

  • can get together groups of people and spend an afternoon brainstorming and getting feedback.

  • It's really not that hard and there's a lot of tools available to do that.

  • And now introducing the real four Ps. So how did the real four Ps influence our marketing

  • and our thinking around app marketing? Well, of course, when we talk about the real

  • four Ps, we're talking about product, which is our app. We're talking about price, which

  • is our business model. We're talking about distribution, which ends up being how many

  • devices are we covering? What operating systems are we developing on? And what channels within

  • those operating systems are we distributing on?

  • And lastly, we're talking about promotions, which can be anything from the type of assets

  • that we build, the thumbnails, the screen shots, the assets, the videos, our banners,

  • search ads, all the kind of tools that we would use to promote our applications.

  • So talking about product, and I love this analogy, and it's actually even better to

  • use this analogy at 4:00 in the afternoon, because by that point, I know most of you

  • people have eaten, so you're not starving, and you won't just run out of the room when

  • you see all this stuff that's on the slide. But truth be told, the way I look at it is

  • it's about snacking versus feasting. Right? So around 4:00 or 5:00 in the afternoon, like

  • right now, you might have a little hunger. You might want a little something to snack

  • on. So you grab, you know, a Snickers bar or you'll grab a bag of chips. And you open

  • that bag of chips, and you will push your hand into the bag, and you will take out one

  • or two chips. But you're not going to put your hand in and take all the chips out of

  • the bag and stuff them in your face. Well, some people might, but you probably won't.

  • It's really something that you do just to kill the hunger at that particular point in

  • time, versus, of course, feasting, which is what's going to happen around 11:00 or midnight

  • tonight after you've been hearing Paul Oakenfold and you're starving and you need about five

  • courses. Totally different experience. Why am I using this example? Mobile app usage

  • and mobile app consumption is all about snacking. It's not about feasting. If you look at the

  • research, the research that we see and the research that's publicly available will tell

  • you that on average, consumers are spending probably around an hour and a half per day

  • using apps. So what does that tell us? Well, that tells us that if they're spending about

  • an hour and a half per day using apps, and they've got maybe 30 apps on their phone,

  • of which they use ten frequently, well, they're probably going to use your app no more than

  • nine or ten minutes a day. Sounds obvious. But what's the implication for product development?

  • There's a couple of implications. The first implication is that if I'm -- as

  • a consumer, I'm using my favorite app, and I'm using it for five minutes a day, if I

  • get a notification from you that says that I need to update my application, activate

  • my Wi-Fi, and download two gigabytes of files -- well, maybe with smart apps, now that's

  • going to be easier. But that still kind of goes against the philosophy of snacking. Why

  • am I going to spend five minutes downloading a file when I'm using the app maybe nine minutes

  • every single day? It has implications in terms of the load speed;

  • right? If I'm getting on a bus and I've got two stops and I want to check my sports scores

  • or I want to see what the weather's like in London -- we know what the weather's like

  • in London -- but if I want to see what the weather is like in London, I don't want the

  • application to take 20 to 30 seconds to load. I want to dip my hand into the experience,

  • dip it out, get my information, thank you very much, and I'm done.

  • And it has lots of other implications as well. Right? It has implications in terms of how

  • easy is the application to use. Let's say that I am on that bus in London and I've got

  • about 15 minutes' commute. Well, am I going to spend five minutes of

  • those 15 minutes actually reading through all, like, you know, the options that are

  • available in the app and trying to read and understand how the app works? Probably not.

  • I really want to get into the experience quickly, which means I need an intuitive UI, I need

  • very easy-to-use features, I need to be able to dip in and dip out very quickly.

  • So understanding your users and understanding that people snack has direct implications

  • for how you develop content. So let's talk for a minute about great applications.

  • And there are thousands of great applications. And, of course, we can't possibly cite them

  • all. But this is an old-school example that I like to use.

  • eBuddy is a Dutch developer that's been around since 2005, 2006, started originally developing

  • J2ME apps. I remember that fondly, because I started my career in games trying to sell

  • J2ME games to carriers five years ago. And hence the first slide about please, please,

  • please. You probably get the rest of the picture. Needless to say, obviously, you know, these

  • guys have been around a very long time. And they do a lot of things really, really

  • well. So what we did was we put together a handy

  • little checklist together for these guys for what we think they do well. A couple of things.

  • First of all, the product really solves a clear and present need. As I mentioned earlier,

  • at the beginning of my speech, you're either entertaining or you're addressing a specific

  • issue or making the person's life easier. eBuddy does that basically by aggregating

  • five or six different IMs into one easy to use client where you can be logged into all

  • your instant messengers and be chatting with your friends anywhere in the world no matter

  • what instant messenger they're using. They saw the need.

  • They had excellent device coverage. One of the things that amazes me about developers

  • is that sometimes we'll see these great apps, and they'll be, like, 500 megabytes in size

  • and have a black list of 1200 devices. Well, one of the ways that you basically get noticed

  • in the apps market is through virality. And virality means reach. And reach means device

  • coverage. These guys have a very simple app that works

  • very quickly, it's easy to use, it loads quickly, the UI is super intuitive and they're available

  • across lots of different devices. As a matter of fact, they're available on nearly every

  • device from Android 1.5 and up. Now, I'm not telling you guys need to go back

  • and develop on 1.5. But what I'm saying is, you need to be available on as many devices

  • as are relevant to maximize your virality. Of course, the other thing that's important

  • with this application which goes without saying and also helps virality is parity of features

  • across operating systems. If I have a great application that I get on Android and it's

  • got these cool features and I tell my friend about it and he's got an iPhone, he goes out

  • and downloads it and it doesn't have the same features, that's kind of a crummy experience

  • for him. Right? Likewise, if the opposite happens that somebody gets a great application

  • on iOS and then tells their friend and their friend downloads the Android version and it's

  • a port, that's not a really cool thing to do, either.

  • And, as a matter of fact, when