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  • CARL AZUZ: I'm Carl Azuz.

  • Fridays are awesome.

  • This is "CNN 10."

  • And here's a down-the-middle explanation

  • of what's going on today.

  • Starting in the US capital, it looks

  • like another partial shutdown of the American government

  • won't happen, at least for the time being.

  • Congress and the president have come to an agreement on how

  • to fund the government in the days ahead,

  • which prevents the partial shutdown.

  • The one that took place in December and January

  • happened because Democrats and Republicans were divided

  • over government spending on a wall or barrier

  • between the US and Mexico.

  • President Donald Trump, who's said for years that a wall is

  • necessary to better protect America,

  • insisted that Congress approve $5.7 billion to pay for it.

  • Democrats have called a wall expensive and unnecessary.

  • And they insisted they would not approve the funding.

  • In the weeks since the shutdown ended,

  • lawmakers from both parties have been

  • trying to work out a compromise on government funding.

  • What they came up with includes more than $1.3 billion

  • to build new barriers on the border.

  • And last night, the White House said President Trump

  • would sign the legislation.

  • Because it falls well short of the $5.7 billion he wanted,

  • though, the White House said the president would declare

  • a separate national emergency to secure

  • the funding for the border.

  • Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer

  • says declaring a national emergency

  • would be a lawless act.

  • The White House says it's prepared

  • for any legal challenges to the declaration,

  • so more partisan fighting could lie ahead.

  • And when we produced this show, nothing

  • had been finalized, though the House

  • and Senate were rushing to get the compromise

  • funding package approved.

  • Crossing the Atlantic, we're taking you

  • to Nigeria, a West African country

  • that is gearing up for a major presidential election

  • this Saturday.

  • We say major because the country has

  • both great importance to Africa and great

  • struggles to overcome.

  • Nigeria is officially a federal presidential republic.

  • It's the largest democracy and economy

  • on the African continent.

  • But according to the Brookings Institution,

  • a US-based research group, Nigeria also

  • has the world's highest number of people

  • living in extreme poverty.

  • It passed India in that ranking just last year.

  • Nigeria's also struggled with violence,

  • terrorism, and corruption.

  • And there are concerns about potential violence

  • damaging this election, though its votes

  • have smoothed out since 2007.

  • The world will be watching when Nigerians

  • go to the polls on the 16th.

  • STEPHANIE BUSARI: Nigeria is often described

  • as the "Giant of Africa."

  • It's the largest economy, the largest

  • oil producer, and the most populous

  • country in the continent.

  • All this should mean that life is good for Nigerians, right?

  • Well, not quite.

  • The constant complaint from citizens

  • is that the country's wealth just does not trickle down

  • to the average men and women, who are

  • struggling to make ends meet.

  • To make matters worse, Nigeria is

  • now the country with the most extremely

  • poor people in the world.

  • According to the World Poverty Clock,

  • there are now 87 million Nigerians living in extreme

  • poverty, which means they are surviving

  • on less than $2.00 a day.

  • How did it all go wrong?

  • The simple answer is that Nigeria's oil wealth has been

  • squandered, stolen, and grossly mismanaged through corruption

  • and sheer incompetence.

  • There's also been an overdependence on oil revenues,

  • which once traded at $100 a barrel and crashed to $40

  • at its lowest price.

  • Nigeria failed to make hay while the sun was shining.

  • And as oil prices fell, revenues dwindled.

  • Successive governments have promised to diversify

  • the economy into other areas.

  • But those indices have not really materialized.

  • And revenue is still largely dependent on oil.

  • Nigeria may be the biggest economy on the continent.

  • But it's in crisis, with high levels of debt

  • and massive overspending that analysts

  • say is just not sustainable.

  • With an estimated 190 million inhabitants,

  • Nigeria is also facing a population explosion

  • and has been projected to overtake

  • the US to become the world's third most

  • populous country by 2050.

  • This population boom brings with it a ticking time bomb

  • of unemployment and poverty, especially

  • among those who are under 25.

  • They make up more than 60% of society, one of the largest

  • youth populations in the world.

  • The lack of infrastructure, poor living conditions, inequality,

  • and lack of jobs has led to many frustrations

  • among this demographic.

  • And they are clamoring for real change.

  • When President Buhari, a former military ruler,

  • was elected in 2015, it was the first peaceful transition

  • of power in the country.

  • He promised to be a new broom, offering a clean sweep

  • of the old routine.

  • But many have been left disillusioned and angry

  • at the rising levels of inequality,

  • lack of opportunities, and extreme poverty.

  • CARL AZUZ: The technology company

  • Amazon has canceled plans to build

  • part of a second headquarters in New York City.

  • Its main campus is in Seattle, Washington.

  • About a year and a half ago, Amazon announced it would

  • build a second headquarters.

  • And more than 230 cities joined a competition

  • to be the site of it.

  • New York City and Crystal City, Virginia, were two of them.

  • Combined, they offered Amazon $2.8 billion

  • worth of incentives-- benefits like tax breaks.

  • And they became the two places Amazon chose

  • for its second headquarters.

  • Amazon was expected to eventually bring 25,000

  • high-paying jobs to each city and tens of billions

  • of dollars in new tax revenue.

  • But protests started in New York.

  • Residents didn't like their current tax dollars

  • being spent to attract Amazon.

  • And some were concerned that home prices would rise,

  • making them too expensive for people who already live there.

  • Amazon and several New York politicians

  • blamed each other for the reasons

  • why the project was canceled.

  • The company says it won't reopen its search for another campus

  • right now.

  • But the governor of New Jersey says

  • his state's open for business.

  • 10-second trivia-- which of these NASA missions to Mars

  • was launched in 2003?

  • Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, Mars Exploration Rovers, Mars

  • Science Laboratory, or MAVEN?

  • The only one of these missions launched

  • that year was that of the Exploration

  • Rovers, Spirit and Opportunity.

  • The time for Opportunity on Mars is over.

  • But before that's taken out of context,

  • we're talking about a rover that's named Opportunity.

  • It was launched in July of 2003.

  • It landed on the red planet in early 2004.

  • It was part of a $1 billion mission that included

  • the other rover named Spirit.

  • That machine got stuck in the sand in 2011

  • and eventually stopped communicating with NASA.

  • Opportunity lasted until last June,

  • when its communications systems also went down.

  • NASA's tried to contact it hundreds of times.

  • But after the space agency's latest attempt wasn't answered

  • on Tuesday night, it said Opportunity's

  • mission was officially over.

  • Both rovers worked much longer than the 90 days

  • their mission had them officially listed for.

  • Scientists say Opportunity traveled 28 miles

  • over the rocky, sandy surface of Mars

  • and took more than 200,000 pictures.

  • They say it also found evidence that suggests ancient Mars once

  • had liquid water on it.

  • Even without Opportunity, NASA has

  • several other active missions around Mars.

  • One of them is the $2 and 1/2 billion

  • Curiosity mission, whose rover continues

  • to roam the red planet.

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  • A lifelong baseball card collector recently visited

  • a shop in Nevada and saw this.

  • It's a 1921 Babe Ruth card.

  • It was listed for $8.00.

  • But because the shop owner thought it was a fake,

  • he sold it for $2.00.

  • Turns out it wasn't a fake.

  • It's apparently one of the rarest

  • baseball cards on the planet.

  • And the collector says he's gotten

  • three multi-million-dollar offers for it.

  • He says he doesn't want to sell it

  • but that he will give more money to the shop owner.

  • Now some may say to the collector, Sultan of "Swhat"

  • are you waiting for?

  • Don't you Bambi-know that card is a Colossus of Clout

  • and could give a "Big Bam" to your bank account?

  • But we can't rush to judge.

  • That would be a behemoth of a bust and a pretty "Ruth" thing

  • to do, anyway.

  • Yeah, Babe Ruth puns--

  • you know they're a hit!

  • "CNN 10" will be back next Tuesday.

  • We're off Monday for the President's Day holiday.

  • We'll see you right here on the 19th.

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CNN 10 | CNN Student News | February 15 2019

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