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  • - Very important. Can't teach without it.

  • Muah!

  • Hello everyone and welcome back to English With Lucy.

  • Today is going to be a video about the verb,

  • to come and the verb to go

  • and when to use which one.

  • Even some of my most advanced students make the mistake

  • so let's clarify exactly when to use them

  • and I hope it helps you improve your English.

  • Now firstly, I'd like to thank you all

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  • Before we get started, I just like to give you

  • a little tip on improving your English conversation

  • and speaking even further.

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  • Alright. Let's get back to the class.

  • So the verb to come and the verb to go.

  • Very easily confused.

  • Now, there are two simple rules

  • that will help you understand them.

  • Firstly though, you need to understand

  • what a speaker is and what a listener is.

  • Well, the speaker is the person talking.

  • Right now, I am the speaker

  • and the listener is the person the speaker is talking to.

  • The person listening.

  • So right now, you my friend, are the listener.

  • Or at least I hope.

  • So the first use for to come

  • is movement between the speaker and the listener.

  • If I say, Juan, come here,

  • I'm asking Juan to move to me or if I say,

  • don't worry, Juan, I'll come to you.

  • I'm moving to where Juan is.

  • We also use to come to talk about movement

  • form another place to where the speaker or listener is.

  • Now, go on the other hand,

  • we use to show movement from where the speaker

  • or listener is to another place, okay?

  • So come from another place to where the speaker

  • or listener is and go from where the speaker

  • or listener is to another place.

  • Okay, so that's pretty easy

  • but thinking about to in the moment

  • when your having a conversation

  • can be quite challenging.

  • I often hear my students say,

  • yeah, next year, I'll come back to Spain.

  • But they're telling me whilst they're in London.

  • So they should say, I'm going back to Spain.

  • If they were talking to they're parents in Spain on holiday,

  • then say, yes, I'll come back to Spain next year.

  • That would be correct.

  • But since they're in London, it's go.

  • Another really nice way of thinking of things

  • is thinking of come as moving closer

  • and go as moving away.

  • So, what happens?

  • Which one do we use if we're talking about somebody,

  • another different person that is neither the speaker

  • nor the listener.

  • Well, it all depends from which point of view

  • we're seeing things.

  • My best friend is called Felicity

  • and she is going to talk to her mother for some help.

  • So let's look at two different sentences

  • using both go and come.

  • The first one,

  • Felicity came to her mother for help.

  • The second,

  • Felicity went to her mother for help.

  • The first sentence, she came to her mother for help.

  • We're looking at it from her mother's view point.

  • In the second one, when Felicity went

  • to her mother for help,

  • we're looking at it from Felicity's point of view.

  • From Felicity's view point.

  • So, that's how we use come and go.

  • Alright. Now I've said a lot of words

  • but I think its time to put this into practise.

  • So, I'm going to do a quiz with you right now.

  • So, I'm going to give you some phrases

  • and you need tell me if they're come or go.

  • You have three seconds and then I will show you the answer.

  • So don't forget to pause it if you need more time to think.

  • Okay, so we're going to do five questions.

  • The first one.

  • One second, I'm just calling Felicity.

  • I'm at Juan's party.

  • Why don't you, too?

  • I'm at Juan's party.

  • Why don't you, too?

  • Which one will it be?

  • So the answer is come.

  • I'm at the party,

  • so I want Felicity to come to me.

  • Okay, I'm still on the phone to Felicity

  • but let's do number two.

  • Felicity, I loved Seville.

  • I'd love to, back there one day.

  • Felicity, I loved Seville.

  • I'd love to, back there one day.

  • So, Felicity lives in London

  • so maybe the answer would be different

  • if I was calling a friend in Seville

  • but Felicity is here.

  • So the answer is go.

  • I'd love to go back there one day.

  • Okay, number three.

  • I went to see the new Bridget Jones film last night.

  • I recommend that you, and see it too.

  • I went to see the new Bridget Jones film last night.

  • I recommend that you, and see it too.

  • Come?

  • Or go?

  • It's go.

  • I recommend that you go and see it too.

  • I've already been so I'm not inviting you with me.

  • And I'm not there right now so it has to be go.

  • Okay, number four.

  • Let's pretend that I'm talking to my boss

  • in the office, okay?

  • I, to work by bus today

  • but I'm going to, home by train.

  • I, to work by bus today

  • but I'm going to, home by train.

  • Okay, well. I'm in the office

  • so I came to work by bus today

  • but I'm going to go home by train.

  • Okay, so now I finished work and I'm at home

  • and I'm telling my flatmate what I did today.

  • It's gonna be a very exciting conversation.

  • Lucky flatmate.

  • So, Angelo and Alisha,

  • I, to work by bus today

  • but I, home by train.

  • I, to work by bus today

  • but I, home by train.

  • Well, since I'm at home,

  • I went to work by bus

  • and I came home by train.

  • How lovely that my flatmates and I

  • can have such exciting conversations.

  • Alright. That was the last one.

  • I hope this video has served to clarify

  • the meanings and the uses of come and go.

  • And I hope that you now feel slightly more confident

  • while speaking in English.

  • Don't forget to connect with me

  • on all of my social media.

  • What am I doing?

  • (laughs)

  • And I like to welcome you back for another English lesson

  • very, very soon.

  • Muah!

- Very important. Can't teach without it.

Subtitles and vocabulary

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A2 UK felicity listener speaker juan bus train

COME OR GO? | Learn British English Grammar*

  • 97 9
    hanboy posted on 2018/12/25
Video vocabulary